Software design

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by Andy Flash, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. Andy Flash

    Andy Flash Guest

    Hi experts (and people who memorize braindumps) :)

    I haven't sat for any cert exams yet but could anyone recommend a path
    of study that will expose me to current software design methods and
    terminologies? I don't have the time to consider University courses
    so it has to be self paced.

    I'm a self taught ASP web developer who is thinking of expanding away
    from the fairly simple, small business applications I've been working
    on. Most of these apps are written totally by myself with very little
    interaction with other IT staff.

    I'm currently dealing with learning ASP.Net and larger apps that
    require communication with DBAs and network gurus. I've already found
    it embarrassing to reveal my lack of knowledge when asked questions
    about "process models" and "lifecycles".

    My intro to the IT world came about after a few years of dabbling with
    coding, followed by a series of small development jobs with MS Access
    databases.

    All genuine replies would be appreciated.

    Andy.
    Andy Flash, Aug 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. Andy Flash

    Guest Guest

    There is no reason for you to feel embarrassed by not being familiar
    with process models and lifecycles. Based on what you've described, this is
    a failure on the part of your IT management; it's simply their job to have
    such things in place.
    Some of the better exam preparation books for 70-300 do a good job of
    providing an overview and pointing the direction for further reading. You
    may benefit from reading a couple of books on the software development
    process in general. Two good ones are The Pragmatic Programmer by Andrew
    Hunt / David Thomas and Death March by Edward Yourdon.
    As far as learning a specific process model in any detail (there are
    several); ask around the office and find out what the other development
    groups are using (if any), and then focus on learning that.

    WKidd

    "Andy Flash" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi experts (and people who memorize braindumps) :)
    >
    > I haven't sat for any cert exams yet but could anyone recommend a path
    > of study that will expose me to current software design methods and
    > terminologies? I don't have the time to consider University courses
    > so it has to be self paced.
    >
    > I'm a self taught ASP web developer who is thinking of expanding away
    > from the fairly simple, small business applications I've been working
    > on. Most of these apps are written totally by myself with very little
    > interaction with other IT staff.
    >
    > I'm currently dealing with learning ASP.Net and larger apps that
    > require communication with DBAs and network gurus. I've already found
    > it embarrassing to reveal my lack of knowledge when asked questions
    > about "process models" and "lifecycles".
    >
    > My intro to the IT world came about after a few years of dabbling with
    > coding, followed by a series of small development jobs with MS Access
    > databases.
    >
    > All genuine replies would be appreciated.
    >
    > Andy.
    >
    Guest, Aug 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. Andy Flash

    clyclopedic Guest

    You may want to look over the way these topics are treated in the current
    Guide to the Software Engineering Body Of Knowledge http://www.swebok.org/
    clyclopedic, Aug 22, 2004
    #3
  4. Andy Flash

    UAError Guest

    Andy Flash <> wrote:

    >Hi experts (and people who memorize braindumps) :)
    >
    >I haven't sat for any cert exams yet but could anyone recommend a path
    >of study that will expose me to current software design methods and
    >terminologies? I don't have the time to consider University courses
    >so it has to be self paced.
    >
    >I'm a self taught ASP web developer who is thinking of expanding away
    >from the fairly simple, small business applications I've been working
    >on. Most of these apps are written totally by myself with very little
    >interaction with other IT staff.
    >
    >I'm currently dealing with learning ASP.Net and larger apps that
    >require communication with DBAs and network gurus. I've already found
    >it embarrassing to reveal my lack of knowledge when asked questions
    >about "process models" and "lifecycles".
    >
    >My intro to the IT world came about after a few years of dabbling with
    >coding, followed by a series of small development jobs with MS Access
    >databases.
    >
    >All genuine replies would be appreciated.
    >
    >Andy.


    Per Aspera Ad Astra

    Currently Ian Sommerville's and Roger Pressman's books on
    software engineering seem to be in favour.

    Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach
    by Roger S Pressman, Roger Pressman
    Hardcover: 880 pages
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 6 edition
    (April 2, 2004)
    ISBN: 007301933X
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/007301933X
    http://catalogs.mhhe.com/mhhe/viewProductDetails.do?isbn=007301933X

    Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach w/ E-Source
    on CD-ROM
    by Roger S. Pressman
    Hardcover
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 5th edition
    (November 1, 2001)
    ISBN: 0072496681
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0072496681

    Software Engineering (7th Edition) (International Computer
    Science Series)
    by Ian Sommerville
    Hardcover: 963 pages
    Publisher: Pearson Education; 7 edition (May 10, 2004)
    ISBN: 0321210263
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321210263

    Software Engineering (6th Edition)
    by Ian Sommerville
    Hardcover: 693 pages
    Publisher: Addison-Wesley Pub Co; 6 edition (August 11,
    2000)
    ISBN: 020139815X
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/020139815X
    http://www.awprofessional.com/title/020139815X


    However you may find Steve McConnell's "Rapid Development"
    (still relevant despite its age, though an update would be
    welcome) to be more accessible.

    Rapid Development
    by Steve McConnell
    Paperback: 680 pages
    Publisher: Microsoft Press; 1st edition (July 2, 1996)
    ISBN: 1556159005
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556159005
    http://www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/770.asp

    None of them are an easy read unless you can read through a
    quantum physics textbook without falling asleep.
    UAError, Aug 22, 2004
    #4
  5. >You may want to look over the way these topics are treated in the current
    >Guide to the Software Engineering Body Of Knowledge http://www.swebok.org/


    sound advice.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Aug 22, 2004
    #5
  6. Sound advice.

    On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 22:36:10 -0400, UAError <> wrote:

    >Andy Flash <> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi experts (and people who memorize braindumps) :)
    >>
    >>I haven't sat for any cert exams yet but could anyone recommend a path
    >>of study that will expose me to current software design methods and
    >>terminologies? I don't have the time to consider University courses
    >>so it has to be self paced.
    >>
    >>I'm a self taught ASP web developer who is thinking of expanding away
    >>from the fairly simple, small business applications I've been working
    >>on. Most of these apps are written totally by myself with very little
    >>interaction with other IT staff.
    >>
    >>I'm currently dealing with learning ASP.Net and larger apps that
    >>require communication with DBAs and network gurus. I've already found
    >>it embarrassing to reveal my lack of knowledge when asked questions
    >>about "process models" and "lifecycles".
    >>
    >>My intro to the IT world came about after a few years of dabbling with
    >>coding, followed by a series of small development jobs with MS Access
    >>databases.
    >>
    >>All genuine replies would be appreciated.
    >>
    >>Andy.

    >
    >Per Aspera Ad Astra
    >
    >Currently Ian Sommerville's and Roger Pressman's books on
    >software engineering seem to be in favour.
    >
    >Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach
    >by Roger S Pressman, Roger Pressman
    >Hardcover: 880 pages
    >Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 6 edition
    >(April 2, 2004)
    >ISBN: 007301933X
    >http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/007301933X
    >http://catalogs.mhhe.com/mhhe/viewProductDetails.do?isbn=007301933X
    >
    >Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach w/ E-Source
    >on CD-ROM
    >by Roger S. Pressman
    >Hardcover
    >Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 5th edition
    >(November 1, 2001)
    >ISBN: 0072496681
    >http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0072496681
    >
    >Software Engineering (7th Edition) (International Computer
    >Science Series)
    >by Ian Sommerville
    >Hardcover: 963 pages
    >Publisher: Pearson Education; 7 edition (May 10, 2004)
    >ISBN: 0321210263
    >http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321210263
    >
    >Software Engineering (6th Edition)
    >by Ian Sommerville
    >Hardcover: 693 pages
    >Publisher: Addison-Wesley Pub Co; 6 edition (August 11,
    >2000)
    >ISBN: 020139815X
    >http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/020139815X
    >http://www.awprofessional.com/title/020139815X
    >
    >
    >However you may find Steve McConnell's "Rapid Development"
    >(still relevant despite its age, though an update would be
    >welcome) to be more accessible.
    >
    >Rapid Development
    >by Steve McConnell
    >Paperback: 680 pages
    >Publisher: Microsoft Press; 1st edition (July 2, 1996)
    >ISBN: 1556159005
    >http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556159005
    >http://www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/770.asp
    >
    >None of them are an easy read unless you can read through a
    >quantum physics textbook without falling asleep.



    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Aug 22, 2004
    #6
  7. > There is no reason for you to feel embarrassed by not being familiar
    >with process models and lifecycles. Based on what you've described, this is
    >a failure on the part of your IT management; it's simply their job to have
    >such things in place.


    The whole industry is a shambles, and facts such as these prove it.

    My believe is that any company that produces software (of any kind)
    should accredited to do so.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Aug 22, 2004
    #7
  8. Andy Flash

    Andy Flash Guest

    Thanks for all the replies people.

    I've managed to borrow a copy of Steve McConnell's "Rapid Development"
    and the www.swebok.org site looks like it will be useful to me.

    Thanks again.
    Andy.
    Andy Flash, Aug 23, 2004
    #8
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