Software Architect == Building Architect?

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by FL Code Monkey, Nov 9, 2004.

  1. I consider myself a fairly accomplished and experienced
    C# programmer, but I lack a comprehensive understanding
    of systems analysis and architecture design, more
    specifically how to build application architectures that
    are resilient to expansion / adding features and not so
    prone to modification-induced bugs(as my current major
    project seems to break in one way or another in seemingly
    unrelated ways sometimes when I add a feature).

    I am considering taking instructor-led MCSD training for
    70-300 to help me learn to blueprint / architect a better
    solution.

    I guess my questions are:

    1) Basically I know how to program some design
    patterns and I know the framework fairly well (for most
    things I would be using), is 70-300 really going to help
    me with blueprinting and designing a resilient
    architecture, or am I just hoping for too much?

    2) Do you think that the problem would not be solved
    by 70-300 and that the problem actually lies in the
    programming itself?

    3) Is it totally due to a lack of regression testing?

    4) Is it a combination of above?

    5) Are there any video-based training courses that
    you can recommend, since the next instructor-led course I
    could find in my area isn't until January?

    Thanks

    FL Code Monkey
     
    FL Code Monkey, Nov 9, 2004
    #1
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  2. FL Code Monkey

    Saga Guest

    Is this a pop quiz? <g>

    I can only give my opinion, as your question touch on profound
    subjects that may have various points of view.

    I have always thought that a good application consists of
    planning and programming. I have found it almost impossible
    to design an app that didn't get expanded in some way that it
    didn't break.

    I try to build apps in such a way that1) I plan ahead by designing
    scalable interfaces and data sources and 2) I program leaving back
    doors for expansion, which has been as simple as not hardcoding
    values or as complicated as componentizing functionality.

    I too am preparing for 70-300 and what I have read so far presents
    a methodology (albeit from an MS point of view) that developers can use
    to better plan the project ahead. Although better apps can be developed
    through plannnig, it is also important that the coding part of the
    project
    be done well, with its own planning stage.

    Sorry.. no videos to recommend, although that isn't a bad idea, as long
    as they don't end up costing $499.99 USD! <g>

    Good luck!
    Saga



    "FL Code Monkey" <> wrote in message
    news:53dd01c4c679$53f76080$...
    >I consider myself a fairly accomplished and experienced
    > C# programmer, but I lack a comprehensive understanding
    > of systems analysis and architecture design, more
    > specifically how to build application architectures that
    > are resilient to expansion / adding features and not so
    > prone to modification-induced bugs(as my current major
    > project seems to break in one way or another in seemingly
    > unrelated ways sometimes when I add a feature).
    >
    > I am considering taking instructor-led MCSD training for
    > 70-300 to help me learn to blueprint / architect a better
    > solution.
    >
    > I guess my questions are:
    >
    > 1) Basically I know how to program some design
    > patterns and I know the framework fairly well (for most
    > things I would be using), is 70-300 really going to help
    > me with blueprinting and designing a resilient
    > architecture, or am I just hoping for too much?
    >
    > 2) Do you think that the problem would not be solved
    > by 70-300 and that the problem actually lies in the
    > programming itself?
    >
    > 3) Is it totally due to a lack of regression testing?
    >
    > 4) Is it a combination of above?
    >
    > 5) Are there any video-based training courses that
    > you can recommend, since the next instructor-led course I
    > could find in my area isn't until January?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > FL Code Monkey
     
    Saga, Nov 9, 2004
    #2
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  3. FL Code Monkey

    Guest Guest

    I've seen a lot of systems with a well architected application tier, but
    very weak database design and implementation, so you may want to look into
    70-229 as well.
    WKidd

    "FL Code Monkey" <> wrote in message
    news:53dd01c4c679$53f76080$...
    > I consider myself a fairly accomplished and experienced
    > C# programmer, but I lack a comprehensive understanding
    > of systems analysis and architecture design, more
    > specifically how to build application architectures that
    > are resilient to expansion / adding features and not so
    > prone to modification-induced bugs(as my current major
    > project seems to break in one way or another in seemingly
    > unrelated ways sometimes when I add a feature).
    >
    > I am considering taking instructor-led MCSD training for
    > 70-300 to help me learn to blueprint / architect a better
    > solution.
    >
    > I guess my questions are:
    >
    > 1) Basically I know how to program some design
    > patterns and I know the framework fairly well (for most
    > things I would be using), is 70-300 really going to help
    > me with blueprinting and designing a resilient
    > architecture, or am I just hoping for too much?
    >
    > 2) Do you think that the problem would not be solved
    > by 70-300 and that the problem actually lies in the
    > programming itself?
    >
    > 3) Is it totally due to a lack of regression testing?
    >
    > 4) Is it a combination of above?
    >
    > 5) Are there any video-based training courses that
    > you can recommend, since the next instructor-led course I
    > could find in my area isn't until January?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > FL Code Monkey
     
    Guest, Nov 10, 2004
    #3
  4. Dear FL Code Monkey,

    Studying for 70-300 will only get you one thing: MSF. The Microsoft Solution
    Framework is MS' methodology to software development.
    To actually pass a 70-300 exam you have to know more than that: know MS'
    server products, their vision, MSDN articles etc.
    The best preparation is doing a project is this area, preferably with an
    experienced colleague.

    If you're still considering doing 70-300 only by studying, consider Exam
    Cram 2's .NET Solution Architectures from Que.

    HTH,

    Pieter de Bruin
    Avanade Netherlands

    "WKidd" wrote:

    > I've seen a lot of systems with a well architected application tier, but
    > very weak database design and implementation, so you may want to look into
    > 70-229 as well.
    > WKidd
    >
    > "FL Code Monkey" <> wrote in message
    > news:53dd01c4c679$53f76080$...
    > > I consider myself a fairly accomplished and experienced
    > > C# programmer, but I lack a comprehensive understanding
    > > of systems analysis and architecture design, more
    > > specifically how to build application architectures that
    > > are resilient to expansion / adding features and not so
    > > prone to modification-induced bugs(as my current major
    > > project seems to break in one way or another in seemingly
    > > unrelated ways sometimes when I add a feature).
    > >
    > > I am considering taking instructor-led MCSD training for
    > > 70-300 to help me learn to blueprint / architect a better
    > > solution.
    > >
    > > I guess my questions are:
    > >
    > > 1) Basically I know how to program some design
    > > patterns and I know the framework fairly well (for most
    > > things I would be using), is 70-300 really going to help
    > > me with blueprinting and designing a resilient
    > > architecture, or am I just hoping for too much?
    > >
    > > 2) Do you think that the problem would not be solved
    > > by 70-300 and that the problem actually lies in the
    > > programming itself?
    > >
    > > 3) Is it totally due to a lack of regression testing?
    > >
    > > 4) Is it a combination of above?
    > >
    > > 5) Are there any video-based training courses that
    > > you can recommend, since the next instructor-led course I
    > > could find in my area isn't until January?
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > FL Code Monkey

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UGlldGVyIGRlIEJydWlu?=, Nov 10, 2004
    #4
  5. You're talking about some of the biggest challenges in software development -
    things that people have been trying to figure out for decades.

    70-300 is not going to help you do anything but get certified. If that's
    what you want, go for it. Otherwise, look elsewhere.

    "FL Code Monkey" wrote:

    > I consider myself a fairly accomplished and experienced
    > C# programmer, but I lack a comprehensive understanding
    > of systems analysis and architecture design, more
    > specifically how to build application architectures that
    > are resilient to expansion / adding features and not so
    > prone to modification-induced bugs(as my current major
    > project seems to break in one way or another in seemingly
    > unrelated ways sometimes when I add a feature).
    >
    > I am considering taking instructor-led MCSD training for
    > 70-300 to help me learn to blueprint / architect a better
    > solution.
    >
    > I guess my questions are:
    >
    > 1) Basically I know how to program some design
    > patterns and I know the framework fairly well (for most
    > things I would be using), is 70-300 really going to help
    > me with blueprinting and designing a resilient
    > architecture, or am I just hoping for too much?
    >
    > 2) Do you think that the problem would not be solved
    > by 70-300 and that the problem actually lies in the
    > programming itself?
    >
    > 3) Is it totally due to a lack of regression testing?
    >
    > 4) Is it a combination of above?
    >
    > 5) Are there any video-based training courses that
    > you can recommend, since the next instructor-led course I
    > could find in my area isn't until January?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > FL Code Monkey
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UmljaA==?=, Nov 12, 2004
    #5
  6. I agree that the Exam Cram book is the best study guide for 70-300.

    I seem to remember spending a lot of time reading all that stuff about the
    MSF - because the MS Study Guide just goes on and on about it. And I read a
    lot of MSDN articles about it, too, because that crummy study guide made it
    sould like that's what the test was all about.

    But it's not. It covers a whole plethora of more specific aspects of .NET -
    like .NET Remoting, Interops, Security, even coding standards. The questions
    are case studies where they present a scenario and ask questions like whether
    the application somebody needs would best be a Windows app, or a web app,
    etc. Had some normailzation questions and a few on ORM. There were only a
    couple of questions on MSF phases and all that.

    The MSF isn't so much about good design as it is about project phases,
    roles, deliverables, testing strategies, requirements management, risk
    management etc. It's about a project pespective, as opposed to the specifics
    of OOD, etc. Personally, what I thought is good about it is that its
    flexible in terms of the specific tasks and would be performed by different
    people, given the circumstances surround a project.



    "Pieter de Bruin" wrote:

    > Dear FL Code Monkey,
    >
    > Studying for 70-300 will only get you one thing: MSF. The Microsoft Solution
    > Framework is MS' methodology to software development.
    > To actually pass a 70-300 exam you have to know more than that: know MS'
    > server products, their vision, MSDN articles etc.
    > The best preparation is doing a project is this area, preferably with an
    > experienced colleague.
    >
    > If you're still considering doing 70-300 only by studying, consider Exam
    > Cram 2's .NET Solution Architectures from Que.
    >
    > HTH,
    >
    > Pieter de Bruin
    > Avanade Netherlands
    >
    > "WKidd" wrote:
    >
    > > I've seen a lot of systems with a well architected application tier, but
    > > very weak database design and implementation, so you may want to look into
    > > 70-229 as well.
    > > WKidd
    > >
    > > "FL Code Monkey" <> wrote in message
    > > news:53dd01c4c679$53f76080$...
    > > > I consider myself a fairly accomplished and experienced
    > > > C# programmer, but I lack a comprehensive understanding
    > > > of systems analysis and architecture design, more
    > > > specifically how to build application architectures that
    > > > are resilient to expansion / adding features and not so
    > > > prone to modification-induced bugs(as my current major
    > > > project seems to break in one way or another in seemingly
    > > > unrelated ways sometimes when I add a feature).
    > > >
    > > > I am considering taking instructor-led MCSD training for
    > > > 70-300 to help me learn to blueprint / architect a better
    > > > solution.
    > > >
    > > > I guess my questions are:
    > > >
    > > > 1) Basically I know how to program some design
    > > > patterns and I know the framework fairly well (for most
    > > > things I would be using), is 70-300 really going to help
    > > > me with blueprinting and designing a resilient
    > > > architecture, or am I just hoping for too much?
    > > >
    > > > 2) Do you think that the problem would not be solved
    > > > by 70-300 and that the problem actually lies in the
    > > > programming itself?
    > > >
    > > > 3) Is it totally due to a lack of regression testing?
    > > >
    > > > 4) Is it a combination of above?
    > > >
    > > > 5) Are there any video-based training courses that
    > > > you can recommend, since the next instructor-led course I
    > > > could find in my area isn't until January?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks
    > > >
    > > > FL Code Monkey

    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UmljaA==?=, Nov 12, 2004
    #6
  7. FL Code Monkey

    Guest Guest

    Assuming the role of both architect and developer (and doing an adequite job
    of both) is probably not feasible on a large project. In many cases the
    fundamental problem is that the project team is not structured or funded
    properly.
    WKidd

    "Rich" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > You're talking about some of the biggest challenges in software

    development -
    > things that people have been trying to figure out for decades.
    >
    > 70-300 is not going to help you do anything but get certified. If that's
    > what you want, go for it. Otherwise, look elsewhere.
    >
    > "FL Code Monkey" wrote:
    >
    > > I consider myself a fairly accomplished and experienced
    > > C# programmer, but I lack a comprehensive understanding
    > > of systems analysis and architecture design, more
    > > specifically how to build application architectures that
    > > are resilient to expansion / adding features and not so
    > > prone to modification-induced bugs(as my current major
    > > project seems to break in one way or another in seemingly
    > > unrelated ways sometimes when I add a feature).
    > >
    > > I am considering taking instructor-led MCSD training for
    > > 70-300 to help me learn to blueprint / architect a better
    > > solution.
    > >
    > > I guess my questions are:
    > >
    > > 1) Basically I know how to program some design
    > > patterns and I know the framework fairly well (for most
    > > things I would be using), is 70-300 really going to help
    > > me with blueprinting and designing a resilient
    > > architecture, or am I just hoping for too much?
    > >
    > > 2) Do you think that the problem would not be solved
    > > by 70-300 and that the problem actually lies in the
    > > programming itself?
    > >
    > > 3) Is it totally due to a lack of regression testing?
    > >
    > > 4) Is it a combination of above?
    > >
    > > 5) Are there any video-based training courses that
    > > you can recommend, since the next instructor-led course I
    > > could find in my area isn't until January?
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > FL Code Monkey
    > >
     
    Guest, Nov 16, 2004
    #7
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