snow pictures

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mikec, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. mikec

    mikec Guest

    i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've lost the
    instructions book.
    what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations please?? i
    have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    Mike
     
    mikec, Aug 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. mikec

    RonTheGuy Guest

    mikec wrote:
    > i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've lost the
    > instructions book.
    > what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations please?? i
    > have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    > Mike
    >
    >

    Did you check the Olympus web site to get a copy of the manual? They
    keep copies of old ones available.
    Ron
     
    RonTheGuy, Aug 16, 2007
    #2
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  3. "mikec" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've lost
    >the instructions book.
    > what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations please??
    > i have no idea what all the adjustments can do.


    Use the spot meter. Place the snow at zone VII. Or zone VI for a darker look
    with better highlight detail retention.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Aug 16, 2007
    #3
  4. mikec

    ray Guest

    On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 19:06:47 +0100, mikec wrote:

    > i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've lost the
    > instructions book.
    > what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations please?? i
    > have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    > Mike


    So, you're standing out in the middle of the glacier waiting for an
    answer? How about finding the user manual on the manufacturer's web site.
     
    ray, Aug 16, 2007
    #4
  5. mikec

    Pat Guest

    On Aug 16, 2:06 pm, "mikec" <> wrote:
    > i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've lost the
    > instructions book.
    > what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations please?? i
    > have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    > Mike


    Hand the camera to a 12-year-old and ask him to set it up for you.
     
    Pat, Aug 16, 2007
    #5
  6. mikec

    mikec Guest

    "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote >

    Use the spot meter. Place the snow at zone VII. Or zone VI for a darker look
    with better highlight detail retention.

    I regret this is double dutch to me!

    i have looked on olympus website (i'm not completely stupid) and there is
    nothing listed. i don't have a 12 year old handy and i'm not going to the
    glacier till friday night. (to answer the various smart arses who seem to
    think they are clever and/or funny.)

    mike
     
    mikec, Aug 16, 2007
    #6
  7. mikec wrote:
    > "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote >
    >
    > Use the spot meter. Place the snow at zone VII. Or zone VI for a darker look
    > with better highlight detail retention.
    >
    > I regret this is double dutch to me!
    >
    > i have looked on olympus website (i'm not completely stupid) and there is
    > nothing listed. i don't have a 12 year old handy and i'm not going to the
    > glacier till friday night. (to answer the various smart arses who seem to
    > think they are clever and/or funny.)
    >

    Set it on Manual. Experiment and check histogram/image.

    Good luck!

    --
    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Aug 16, 2007
    #7
  8. mikec

    Ray Paseur Guest

    "mikec" <> wrote in
    news::

    > i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've
    > lost the instructions book.
    > what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations
    > please?? i have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    > Mike
    >
    >


    Rule of thumb: Underexpose dark scenes and overexpose bright scenes.
    Here's why: Your camera meter "thinks" everything in its measurement zone
    is 18% gray. So if the camera meter looks at a brilliant blue-white
    glacier and tries to set the exposure as if it were looking at 18% gray,
    the exposure will be set to make the glacier look 18% gray. Which it's
    not. Instead, try taking a meter reading off the palm of your hand, and
    using that setting to photograph the glacier. Your hand is pretty close to
    18% gray. So is a well-cared for lawn, in case you're shooting on a golf
    course. You should consider bracketing the exposure reading off your hand,
    too. It's great up there on the glaciers! ~Ray
     
    Ray Paseur, Aug 17, 2007
    #8
  9. mikec

    Ron Hunter Guest

    mikec wrote:
    > "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote >
    >
    > Use the spot meter. Place the snow at zone VII. Or zone VI for a darker look
    > with better highlight detail retention.
    >
    > I regret this is double dutch to me!
    >
    > i have looked on olympus website (i'm not completely stupid) and there is
    > nothing listed. i don't have a 12 year old handy and i'm not going to the
    > glacier till friday night. (to answer the various smart arses who seem to
    > think they are clever and/or funny.)
    >
    > mike
    >
    >

    Probably they aren't sympathetic to someone who can't seem to find his
    manual. Most people keep them, just in case they have some disaster,
    and they need to know where to send the camera for repair. Heaven
    forbid anyone should ever actually READ one before trying to use the camera!

    I don't see the model your listed on the Olympus site, which seems a bit
    strange to me, as it is listed in numerous reviews. Is this a new camera?
    If you really don't know what spot meter settings, or zones are, then I
    suggest you set it on 'Auto', and enjoy. And spend some quality time
    with the manual when you get back. Have fun on the glacier, and wear
    some heavy socks!
     
    Ron Hunter, Aug 17, 2007
    #9
  10. mikec

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Ray Paseur wrote:
    > "mikec" <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've
    >> lost the instructions book.
    >> what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations
    >> please?? i have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    >> Mike
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Rule of thumb: Underexpose dark scenes and overexpose bright scenes.
    > Here's why: Your camera meter "thinks" everything in its measurement zone
    > is 18% gray. So if the camera meter looks at a brilliant blue-white
    > glacier and tries to set the exposure as if it were looking at 18% gray,
    > the exposure will be set to make the glacier look 18% gray. Which it's
    > not. Instead, try taking a meter reading off the palm of your hand, and
    > using that setting to photograph the glacier. Your hand is pretty close to
    > 18% gray. So is a well-cared for lawn, in case you're shooting on a golf
    > course. You should consider bracketing the exposure reading off your hand,
    > too. It's great up there on the glaciers! ~Ray


    Hummm. Ray, I have gray hair, but my palm is still a healthy shade of
    pink. Grin.
    But, you are right about the camera doing its best to make the ice,
    which is quite blue in a glacier, look white, or a dirty gray.
     
    Ron Hunter, Aug 17, 2007
    #10
  11. mikec

    BaumBadier Guest

    On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 23:02:41 GMT, Ray Paseur <> wrote:

    >"mikec" <> wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've
    >> lost the instructions book.
    >> what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations
    >> please?? i have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    >> Mike
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Rule of thumb: Underexpose dark scenes and overexpose bright scenes.
    >Here's why: Your camera meter "thinks" everything in its measurement zone
    >is 18% gray. So if the camera meter looks at a brilliant blue-white
    >glacier and tries to set the exposure as if it were looking at 18% gray,
    >the exposure will be set to make the glacier look 18% gray. Which it's
    >not. Instead, try taking a meter reading off the palm of your hand, and
    >using that setting to photograph the glacier. Your hand is pretty close to
    >18% gray. So is a well-cared for lawn, in case you're shooting on a golf
    >course. You should consider bracketing the exposure reading off your hand,
    >too. It's great up there on the glaciers! ~Ray


    Something else worth mentioning, turn off any auto white-balance features if you
    know your main landscape lighting and subjects are all awash with a particular
    hue. In this case it will be the natural blue color of the frozen water. If you
    leave auto white-balance on you will fail to capture the colors properly. If you
    must tone down the sometimes intense blue colors in glacial ice then do it later
    in editing. Just like when capturing a sunset. Everyone leaves auto
    white-balance on and then they wonder what happened to all those spectacular
    shades of red and gold that they remember seeing with no way to properly restore
    them in post-processing. Set your camera to sunlight setting for sunsets, it's
    the only way to preserve the colors.

    A good rule of thumb to use in any scenario where the natural setting has its
    own color: set your camera's white balance for whatever main light-SOURCE is
    available at the time, sun, cloudy, etc. As these will provide more proper
    colors in your subjects. People get so caught up in turning every camera out
    there into auto-everything P&S cameras (dSLRs especially) and becoming dependent
    on automation to do their thinking for them that they end up allowing technology
    and software authors (who know nothing about photography and reality) to totally
    ruin their photography.

    Another instance of when to turn off auto white-balance (and goes against the
    source-light advice above), when taking photographs under the canopy of dense
    forested areas where everything is awash in green from all the sunlight
    filtering through all the leaves. You will loose the natural ambience on all
    your subjects if you allow your camera to automatically adjust for it. Without
    that green hue your photos will look artificial, devoid of reality. Look through
    the breaks in the leaves to see if the sky is clear or cloudy and use a sunlight
    or cloudy setting for your white-balance. Technically they may look better with
    the green-light auto balanced for white, but your photos sure won't be depicting
    reality and conveying what it is really like to the final audience. If you
    simply must remove some green do it later in post-processing. But only tone it
    down somewhat or you lose the realism. The same holds true even more-so during
    autumn if you are under the canopy of many shades of crimsons and golds. *Don't
    rob the audience of the visual experience!*
     
    BaumBadier, Aug 17, 2007
    #11
  12. mikec

    mikec Guest

    many thanks for the recent, very much more useful than before, set of
    suggestions.
    have printed them off, will read on the plane, and look out for me in the
    sunday papers!
    Mike

    "BaumBadier" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 23:02:41 GMT, Ray Paseur <> wrote:
    >
    >>"mikec" <> wrote in
    >>news::
    >>
    >>> i am going up a glacier with my little Olympus l400 camera but i've
    >>> lost the instructions book.
    >>> what should i do to make the best of mountain/glacier situations
    >>> please?? i have no idea what all the adjustments can do.
    >>> Mike
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Rule of thumb: Underexpose dark scenes and overexpose bright scenes.
    >>Here's why: Your camera meter "thinks" everything in its measurement zone
    >>is 18% gray. So if the camera meter looks at a brilliant blue-white
    >>glacier and tries to set the exposure as if it were looking at 18% gray,
    >>the exposure will be set to make the glacier look 18% gray. Which it's
    >>not. Instead, try taking a meter reading off the palm of your hand, and
    >>using that setting to photograph the glacier. Your hand is pretty close
    >>to
    >>18% gray. So is a well-cared for lawn, in case you're shooting on a golf
    >>course. You should consider bracketing the exposure reading off your
    >>hand,
    >>too. It's great up there on the glaciers! ~Ray

    >
    > Something else worth mentioning, turn off any auto white-balance features
    > if you
    > know your main landscape lighting and subjects are all awash with a
    > particular
    > hue. In this case it will be the natural blue color of the frozen water.
    > If you
    > leave auto white-balance on you will fail to capture the colors properly.
    > If you
    > must tone down the sometimes intense blue colors in glacial ice then do it
    > later
    > in editing. Just like when capturing a sunset. Everyone leaves auto
    > white-balance on and then they wonder what happened to all those
    > spectacular
    > shades of red and gold that they remember seeing with no way to properly
    > restore
    > them in post-processing. Set your camera to sunlight setting for sunsets,
    > it's
    > the only way to preserve the colors.
    >
    > A good rule of thumb to use in any scenario where the natural setting has
    > its
    > own color: set your camera's white balance for whatever main light-SOURCE
    > is
    > available at the time, sun, cloudy, etc. As these will provide more proper
    > colors in your subjects. People get so caught up in turning every camera
    > out
    > there into auto-everything P&S cameras (dSLRs especially) and becoming
    > dependent
    > on automation to do their thinking for them that they end up allowing
    > technology
    > and software authors (who know nothing about photography and reality) to
    > totally
    > ruin their photography.
    >
    > Another instance of when to turn off auto white-balance (and goes against
    > the
    > source-light advice above), when taking photographs under the canopy of
    > dense
    > forested areas where everything is awash in green from all the sunlight
    > filtering through all the leaves. You will loose the natural ambience on
    > all
    > your subjects if you allow your camera to automatically adjust for it.
    > Without
    > that green hue your photos will look artificial, devoid of reality. Look
    > through
    > the breaks in the leaves to see if the sky is clear or cloudy and use a
    > sunlight
    > or cloudy setting for your white-balance. Technically they may look better
    > with
    > the green-light auto balanced for white, but your photos sure won't be
    > depicting
    > reality and conveying what it is really like to the final audience. If you
    > simply must remove some green do it later in post-processing. But only
    > tone it
    > down somewhat or you lose the realism. The same holds true even more-so
    > during
    > autumn if you are under the canopy of many shades of crimsons and golds.
    > *Don't
    > rob the audience of the visual experience!*
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    mikec, Aug 17, 2007
    #12
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