Small network equip purchase direction

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by instauratio, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. instauratio

    instauratio Guest

    My client has a sloooow network (10 users 1 server). ISDN modem, 10Mbps
    old switch. Avg speed 50Kpbs from internet. After 8 years of business
    they have a total of 6GB of information on their server.

    I *was* going to recommend "business class DSL" (300Mbps guaranteed
    upload)and just use a simple home type router/hub from off the shelf, a
    Pix 501 next with a 100Mbps switch. The client wants to remote connect
    - maybe 2 or 3 users at a time.

    After thinking some (a dangerous thing for me), I felt that this might
    not be enough. Maybe I need to move to a higher bandwidth service with
    a Cisco 800 series router? Can someone recommend a solution based on
    experience with a network this size. I just want to make certain that I
    don't give them a "bottleneck" and have to recommend more purchases
    later.
     
    instauratio, Jan 9, 2005
    #1
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  2. instauratio

    Rod Dorman Guest

    In article <>,
    instauratio <> wrote:
    > ...
    >I *was* going to recommend "business class DSL" (300Mbps guaranteed
    >upload)and just use a simple home type router/hub from off the shelf, a


    Is that 300Mbps a typeo? That's nearly double an OC-3.

    --
    -- Rod --
    rodd(at)polylogics(dot)com
     
    Rod Dorman, Jan 9, 2005
    #2
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  3. In article <>,
    instauratio <> wrote:
    :My client has a sloooow network (10 users 1 server). ISDN modem, 10Mbps
    :eek:ld switch. Avg speed 50Kpbs from internet. After 8 years of business
    :they have a total of 6GB of information on their server.

    :I *was* going to recommend "business class DSL" (300Mbps guaranteed
    :upload)and just use a simple home type router/hub from off the shelf, a
    :pix 501 next with a 100Mbps switch. The client wants to remote connect
    :- maybe 2 or 3 users at a time.

    :After thinking some (a dangerous thing for me), I felt that this might
    :not be enough. Maybe I need to move to a higher bandwidth service with
    :a Cisco 800 series router? Can someone recommend a solution based on
    :experience with a network this size. I just want to make certain that I
    :don't give them a "bottleneck" and have to recommend more purchases
    :later.

    The 830 series is not necesarily higher bandwidth. The 830 does DES and
    3DES in hardware, with a rate of 7 megabits per second for 3DES, but it
    does AES in software, falling to 2 megabits per second. The PIX 501 is
    rated at 3 megabits per second 3DES and 4.5 megabits per second
    AES-128, both done in software. The implication is that the CPU on the
    PIX 501 is about twice as fast as the CPU on the 830 series. That is
    plausible: the 830 series CPU speed is not given anywhere that I can
    find on Cisco's site, but the 820 series is listed as 50 MHz compared
    to the 501's 133 MHz, and the 830 series is not double the 820's
    performance for regular operations. The 830 series is rated at a
    maximum of 9 megabits per second cleartext (i.e., data not going
    through the VPN); the PIX 501 is rated at 60 megabits per second
    cleartext.

    The PIX 501 entry unit has a license permitting a maximum of "10
    users". What is actually counted is the number of internal hosts that
    have simultaneously active translations, so if you have 10 users all
    connecting out (possibly because they are all using a browser home page
    that autorefreshes) and you also have a distinct server that the remote
    users are connecting to, then that would be 11 active interior hosts
    with translations and the license limit would prohibit that. You can
    get a "50 user" license, and that might be one of the times when that
    is appropriate. My advice in the past has been that if you expect that
    you might grow to have more than 20 to 25 internal devices, that it
    makes more sense to skip the PIX 501 and 50 user license and to go
    directly for a PIX 506E.

    The 506E is rated at 100 megabits per second cleartext, 17 megabits per
    second 3DES, 30 megabits per second AES-128, and has no user licence
    restrictions. Furthermore, as of PIX 6.3(4), the 506E supports 1 (or
    possibly 2) logical interfaces on the inside interface. A logical
    interface is an 802.1Q VLAN with a distinct IP address. If the 506E
    interior is connected to a switch that can do 802.1Q trunking, then the
    effect is to allow the 506E to have a DMZ interface [without actually
    having a 3rd physical interface.]


    :I *was* going to recommend "business class DSL" (300Mbps guaranteed
    :upload)

    This is the second time you've posted saying 300 Mbps for your
    new connection. 300 Mbps is not possible with any broadband
    carrier I've ever heard of -- it is the equivilent of two OC-3
    connections, and would cost a bundle to put in. Last time you
    followed up saying that you meant 300 Kbps.

    Before we can tell you whether any particular equipment or
    connection will be fast enough, you need to specify what the
    connection is going to be used for, and you have to have a good
    idea of how people would use the connection if they were allowed to.
    For example, if your users would all go wild on downloading
    movies and MP3s, then if you want to accomedate that, you are
    going to need a much faster line.

    You did not speak at all this time about how your connection was
    going to be used, but last time around, in the thread
    "bandwidth for remote access", you gave some indications.
    At that time, replied saying that

    I have 256K frame connections to hundreds of locations that had 15 or
    20 users doing the same thing.

    I'm not sure why you are revisiting the question now [without
    even providing usage estimates], unless you feel that thrill_seeker3's
    practical experience in the matter was either not trustworthy
    or not applicable because you intended to do something other
    than what you stated you wanted to do before. Either way, if you
    want something more from us, you are going to have to provide
    more information about how the network connection will be used.

    6 GB of data on a server is not very much these days.
    Copying -all- of that around a 100 Mb LAN at (say) 50% efficiency
    would only take about 16 minutes. True, it would take ~45 hours
    to copy all of it offsite at 300 Kb/s. To what extent would
    people actually be copying it to the outside? If people -are-
    going to be copying a lot of data to the outside, then you need
    to tell us that -- and if they aren't, then mentioning the
    accumulated data size isn't relevant unless you are asking not
    about the external connection but about the internal usage...
    in which case you need to tell us how the interior users will
    be accessing the data and what their expectations will be.

    We can't tell you whether any particular equipment is good enough
    or not unless you help us by being more specific about what
    the performance expectations are.
    --
    "Infinity is like a stuffed walrus I can hold in the palm of my hand.
    Don't do anything with infinity you wouldn't do with a stuffed walrus."
    -- Dr. Fletcher, Va. Polytechnic Inst. and St. Univ.
     
    Walter Roberson, Jan 9, 2005
    #3
  4. instauratio

    BradReeseCom Guest

    BradReeseCom, Jan 10, 2005
    #4
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