Slow wireless networking

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Phil, Mar 18, 2005.

  1. Phil

    Phil Guest

    I have a desktop PC connected to broadband Internet via a D-Link 2.4GHz
    wireless router (DI-614+) running 802.11b. I also have a laptop computer
    with an Intel (R) PRO/wireless 2915ABG network card running 802.11 b/g. I am
    able to access the Internet through the wireless connection, but the speed
    is very very slow. So, I am thinking about upgrading to a better router.
    What hardware is recommended?
     
    Phil, Mar 18, 2005
    #1
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  2. Phil wrote:

    > I have a desktop PC connected to broadband Internet via a D-Link 2.4GHz
    > wireless router (DI-614+) running 802.11b. I also have a laptop computer
    > with an Intel (R) PRO/wireless 2915ABG network card running 802.11 b/g. I am
    > able to access the Internet through the wireless connection, but the speed
    > is very very slow. So, I am thinking about upgrading to a better router.
    > What hardware is recommended?


    Why do you think it's the router causing the problem? Even if it's only
    running plain vanilla 802.11b it'll hit sustained rates of 5-7 Mbs if
    you have good signal strength and signal quality. What kind of speed are
    you getting?
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Mar 18, 2005
    #2
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  3. Phil

    Phil Guest

    Actually, I'm not at all sure the problem is caused by the router. That was
    just a guess and it may well be wrong. The communication speed I am getting
    varies somewhat, but it is always very slow. I don't know how to measure the
    speed precisely.

    Perhaps I should rephrase my question: "If one has a desktop PC directly
    connected to the Internet and achieving good transmission speed, and one
    also has a laptop PC connected via a wireless network arrangement, and if
    the laptop PC is realizing a very slow Internet transmission speed, what are
    the various things one might do to speed up the laptop's communications?

    "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Phil wrote:
    >
    >> I have a desktop PC connected to broadband Internet via a D-Link 2.4GHz
    >> wireless router (DI-614+) running 802.11b. I also have a laptop computer
    >> with an Intel (R) PRO/wireless 2915ABG network card running 802.11 b/g. I
    >> am able to access the Internet through the wireless connection, but the
    >> speed is very very slow. So, I am thinking about upgrading to a better
    >> router. What hardware is recommended?

    >
    > Why do you think it's the router causing the problem? Even if it's only
    > running plain vanilla 802.11b it'll hit sustained rates of 5-7 Mbs if you
    > have good signal strength and signal quality. What kind of speed are you
    > getting?
     
    Phil, Mar 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Phil wrote:
    > Actually, I'm not at all sure the problem is caused by the router. That was
    > just a guess and it may well be wrong. The communication speed I am getting
    > varies somewhat, but it is always very slow. I don't know how to measure the
    > speed precisely.
    >
    > Perhaps I should rephrase my question: "If one has a desktop PC directly
    > connected to the Internet and achieving good transmission speed, and one
    > also has a laptop PC connected via a wireless network arrangement, and if
    > the laptop PC is realizing a very slow Internet transmission speed, what are
    > the various things one might do to speed up the laptop's communications?


    Actually, that's much better. You can measure the speed in a number of
    ways, probably the simplest is to go to a speed measuring site such as
    http://www.giganews.com/test_connect.html and pick either the European
    or US server to test to get a pretty good idea. The software that comes
    with most wireless clients will give you an indicator (sometimes very
    rudimentary) of your connection quality and what speed it's supposed to
    be working at, such as 11Mb, 5mb, so on. Test the laptop very close to
    the router and see if that changes anything. Change channels and see
    what happens. You may be right about the router being the problem, but
    it may not be. Sometimes updating the firmware to a wireless device will
    work wonders.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Mar 19, 2005
    #4
  5. Phil

    Paul - xxx Guest

    Rôgêr composed the following;:
    > Phil wrote:
    >> Actually, I'm not at all sure the problem is caused by the router.
    >> That was just a guess and it may well be wrong. The communication
    >> speed I am getting varies somewhat, but it is always very slow. I
    >> don't know how to measure the speed precisely.
    >>
    >> Perhaps I should rephrase my question: "If one has a desktop PC
    >> directly connected to the Internet and achieving good transmission
    >> speed, and one also has a laptop PC connected via a wireless network
    >> arrangement, and if the laptop PC is realizing a very slow Internet
    >> transmission speed, what are the various things one might do to
    >> speed up the laptop's communications?

    >
    > Actually, that's much better. You can measure the speed in a number of
    > ways, probably the simplest is to go to a speed measuring site such as
    > http://www.giganews.com/test_connect.html and pick either the European
    > or US server to test to get a pretty good idea. The software that
    > comes with most wireless clients will give you an indicator
    > (sometimes very rudimentary) of your connection quality and what
    > speed it's supposed to be working at, such as 11Mb, 5mb, so on. Test
    > the laptop very close to the router and see if that changes anything.
    > Change channels and see what happens.


    In our house if we use channel 1 (default) we have similar symptoms, if
    we use any other channel then we're fine .. ;) No ideas as to why, but
    cba to find out either, it just works. ;)


    --
    Paul ...
    (8(|) Homer Rules ..... Doh !!!
     
    Paul - xxx, Mar 19, 2005
    #5
  6. Phil

    Capitol Guest

    Paul - xxx wrote:
    > In our house if we use channel 1 (default) we have similar symptoms, if
    > we use any other channel then we're fine .. ;) No ideas as to why, but
    > cba to find out either, it just works. ;)
    >
    >


    May well be that someone else is using the same frequency, or their
    microwave is! 2.4GHz seems to be very popular with some headlamps and
    ignition systems and can be a 3rd harmonic of some phone/tv systems.
    Propogation range can vary if the transmitter or receiver is off frequency.

    Regards
    Capitol
     
    Capitol, Mar 19, 2005
    #6
  7. Very nice, you snott-nosed little son of a bitch.
    "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Phil wrote:
    >
    >> I have a desktop PC connected to broadband Internet via a D-Link 2.4GHz
    >> wireless router (DI-614+) running 802.11b. I also have a laptop computer
    >> with an Intel (R) PRO/wireless 2915ABG network card running 802.11 b/g. I
    >> am able to access the Internet through the wireless connection, but the
    >> speed is very very slow. So, I am thinking about upgrading to a better
    >> router. What hardware is recommended?

    >
    > Why do you think it's the router causing the problem? Even if it's only
    > running plain vanilla 802.11b it'll hit sustained rates of 5-7 Mbs if you
    > have good signal strength and signal quality. What kind of speed are you
    > getting?
     
    Blinky the Shark, Mar 19, 2005
    #7
  8. Phil

    Keme Guest

    Phil wrote:
    > I have a desktop PC connected to broadband Internet via a D-Link 2.4GHz
    > wireless router (DI-614+) running 802.11b. I also have a laptop computer
    > with an Intel (R) PRO/wireless 2915ABG network card running 802.11 b/g. I am
    > able to access the Internet through the wireless connection, but the speed
    > is very very slow. So, I am thinking about upgrading to a better router.
    > What hardware is recommended?
    >
    >

    I can think of several bottlenecks:
    Broadband connection: Not all DSL modems / fiber adapters / multiplexers
    (or whatever your connection is...) communicate well with each other.
    Try connecting a PC with a network cable instead of going wireless. If
    the connection is still slow, WLAN i not the problem, but your broadband
    connection is. Contact your service provider.

    Protocol switching overhead: If you simultaneously use b/g on one
    computer and b-only on another, the router will be constantly switching.
    The solution is to change to b-only on the router.

    Undetected collisions: With 802.11g, I believe the "safe radius" is
    around 15m (50ft). If several computers try to connect using 802.11g on
    greater distance, you may get undetected collisions, late error
    detection, with severe impact on speed. Remedy like previous point: b-only.

    Unauthorized access: With WLAN networking is easy. Unfortunately, if you
    take the easiest way (plug and go), it's just as easy for the guy (or
    gal) next door. This may cause two kinds of trouble:
    - Undesired traffic, loading down both WLAN and broadband channels.
    - Increased fault rate (detected collisions, and in the worst case,
    undetected collisions)
    Remedy: Use at least one of these security options (listed in order of
    preference, for ease of use/availability): WPA/WEP, MAC address
    filtering, disable SSID broadcast, reduce power (WLAN radio transmission
    power), RADIUS.

    Interference: Like others have mentioned, other electronic equipment
    (including other base stations in the neighborhood) may cause radio
    interference. Reflecting surfaces (large metal sheets, steel reinforced
    concrete walls, other metallic surfaces or grids) can do the same.
    Remedies:
    - Try different radio channels. That may eliminate external
    interference, and change reflection interference patterns.
    - Talk to the neighbours. With many WLAN routers close together, you're
    bound to be in trouble. Turn down transmission power on all routers, and
    set channels on neighbour routers 5 steps apart. (Ie. use channels 1, 6
    and 11.) The reason for this: WLAN uses "spread spectrum". The channel
    indicate the center frequency, but the frequencies used vary with
    approx. 2.5 channels up and down. With a spanning of less than 5
    channels, interference may occur.
     
    Keme, Mar 28, 2005
    #8
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