Slightly O.T. - Any news on wireless technology for rural areas?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Mike Webb, Jul 25, 2007.

  1. Mike Webb

    Mike Webb Guest

    We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline (DSL,
    T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access to the
    wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default, satellite.
    This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we have of a max of
    17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.

    I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a company
    nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage however. Anyone
    know of new technologies/capabilities that could help rural users like us,
    either now or in the (near) future?

    --
    Mike Webb
    Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
     
    Mike Webb, Jul 25, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Mike Webb

    Lem Guest

    Mike Webb wrote:
    > We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline (DSL,
    > T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access to the
    > wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default, satellite.
    > This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we have of a max of
    > 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.
    >
    > I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a company
    > nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage however. Anyone
    > know of new technologies/capabilities that could help rural users like us,
    > either now or in the (near) future?
    >

    This thread's about 2 years old, but it might give you a few ideas:
    http://www.kottke.org/05/06/rural-internet-options

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
     
    Lem, Jul 25, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mike Webb

    Jim Guest

    "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    news:OsfR%...
    > We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline (DSL,
    > T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access to the
    > wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default, satellite.
    > This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we have of a max
    > of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.
    >
    > I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    > company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    > however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    > rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >
    > --
    > Mike Webb
    > Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    > a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >

    Hughesnet.com furnishes a service via satellite. I have heard that the
    service is rather expensive. All I know is what I see on the TV.

    Jim
     
    Jim, Jul 25, 2007
    #3
  4. Mike Webb

    Mike Webb Guest

    Thanks. Lot's of ideas to check out.

    "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mike Webb wrote:
    >> We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline
    >> (DSL, T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access
    >> to the wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default,
    >> satellite. This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we
    >> have of a max of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.
    >>
    >> I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    >> company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    >> however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    >> rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >>

    > This thread's about 2 years old, but it might give you a few ideas:
    > http://www.kottke.org/05/06/rural-internet-options
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
     
    Mike Webb, Jul 25, 2007
    #4
  5. Mike Webb

    Mike Webb Guest

    True, but we use Wildlblue now for satellite. HughesNet has the same
    restriction on downloads per 30-day rolling average. We are a research
    non-profit heavily into GIS apps. We push the 17Gb limit all the time.
    When we exceed it, we are dropped down to 56K until the average falls under
    the threshold. Gotta be a better way.

    "Jim" <> wrote in message
    news:yZLpi.20620$...
    >
    > "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    > news:OsfR%...
    >> We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline
    >> (DSL, T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access
    >> to the wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default,
    >> satellite. This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we
    >> have of a max of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.
    >>
    >> I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    >> company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    >> however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    >> rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Mike Webb
    >> Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    >> a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >>

    > Hughesnet.com furnishes a service via satellite. I have heard that the
    > service is rather expensive. All I know is what I see on the TV.
    >
    > Jim
    >
     
    Mike Webb, Jul 25, 2007
    #5
  6. The most economical thing I have seen is cellphone based systems by Sprint
    and Verison. We purchased the Verizon system and it gets over 700kb
    download speed and over 200kb upload speed by testing with
    www.speakeasy.net/speedtest .

    We are using the USB based device "USB720".

    We are an NBC affiated TV Station and use it for reporters to use with a
    laptop at remote locations to get on the Net and VPN back into the station
    to run the Newsroon System to put in their stories. We are also working on
    using the same device with our Satelite Uplink Truck that has a rack mounted
    PC built into the truck.

    As with any wireless technology,..the signal strength directly effects the
    speed. Too low a signal can cause it to drop the connection. But in
    practice we have had pretty good luck with it so far.

    I'm guessing the cost is around $70 a month,..but I'm not the one that pays
    the bill.


    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html

    Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
    http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc

    Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp

    Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    -----------------------------------------------------

    "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    news:OsfR%...
    > We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline (DSL,
    > T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access to the
    > wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default, satellite.
    > This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we have of a max
    > of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.
    >
    > I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    > company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    > however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    > rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >
    > --
    > Mike Webb
    > Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    > a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >
     
    Phillip Windell, Jul 25, 2007
    #6
  7. Mike Webb

    Mike Webb Guest

    Sounds like a heckuva deal. I'm not sure how it'd work with a server for our
    LAN. I'll look into it, thanks.

    "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    news:%23nq4b%...
    > The most economical thing I have seen is cellphone based systems by Sprint
    > and Verison. We purchased the Verizon system and it gets over 700kb
    > download speed and over 200kb upload speed by testing with
    > www.speakeasy.net/speedtest .
    >
    > We are using the USB based device "USB720".
    >
    > We are an NBC affiated TV Station and use it for reporters to use with a
    > laptop at remote locations to get on the Net and VPN back into the station
    > to run the Newsroon System to put in their stories. We are also working
    > on using the same device with our Satelite Uplink Truck that has a rack
    > mounted PC built into the truck.
    >
    > As with any wireless technology,..the signal strength directly effects the
    > speed. Too low a signal can cause it to drop the connection. But in
    > practice we have had pretty good luck with it so far.
    >
    > I'm guessing the cost is around $70 a month,..but I'm not the one that
    > pays the bill.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Phillip Windell
    > www.wandtv.com
    >
    > The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    > Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    > -----------------------------------------------------
    > Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    > http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html
    >
    > Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
    > http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc
    >
    > Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    > http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    >
    > Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    > http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    > -----------------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    > news:OsfR%...
    >> We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline
    >> (DSL, T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access
    >> to the wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default,
    >> satellite. This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we
    >> have of a max of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.
    >>
    >> I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    >> company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    >> however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    >> rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Mike Webb
    >> Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    >> a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Mike Webb, Jul 25, 2007
    #7
  8. "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sounds like a heckuva deal. I'm not sure how it'd work with a server for
    > our LAN. I'll look into it, thanks.


    I don't know if it would be very good for that.

    Their is a model of Linksys box that has a slot for a PC card (like a laptop
    uses).
    The model is WRT54G3G-ST
    http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Sate...nksys/Common/VisitorWrapper&lid=9873239789B01

    Of course it is still a "home user" quality product and I'd hate to run a
    commercial network off of one, but it still might be a reasonable solution.

    One of our sister stations in Springfield, Mass experimented with one of
    those combined with the Sprint Wireless Broadband product. They said is
    worked pretty well.
    http://www.wwlp.com/

    You can probably track down their phone number off of their site. Their IT
    guy is Bob McCormick.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html

    Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
    http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc

    Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp

    Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Jul 25, 2007
    #8
  9. Mike Webb

    Mike Webb Guest

    Thanks!

    "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Sounds like a heckuva deal. I'm not sure how it'd work with a server for
    >> our LAN. I'll look into it, thanks.

    >
    > I don't know if it would be very good for that.
    >
    > Their is a model of Linksys box that has a slot for a PC card (like a
    > laptop uses).
    > The model is WRT54G3G-ST
    > http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Sate...nksys/Common/VisitorWrapper&lid=9873239789B01
    >
    > Of course it is still a "home user" quality product and I'd hate to run a
    > commercial network off of one, but it still might be a reasonable
    > solution.
    >
    > One of our sister stations in Springfield, Mass experimented with one of
    > those combined with the Sprint Wireless Broadband product. They said is
    > worked pretty well.
    > http://www.wwlp.com/
    >
    > You can probably track down their phone number off of their site. Their IT
    > guy is Bob McCormick.
    >
    > --
    > Phillip Windell
    > www.wandtv.com
    >
    > The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    > Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    > -----------------------------------------------------
    > Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    > http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html
    >
    > Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
    > http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc
    >
    > Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    > http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    >
    > Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    > http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    > -----------------------------------------------------
    >
    >
     
    Mike Webb, Jul 25, 2007
    #9
  10. Mike Webb

    Lem Guest

    Mike Webb wrote:
    > Sounds like a heckuva deal. I'm not sure how it'd work with a server for our
    > LAN. I'll look into it, thanks.
    >
    > "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    > news:%23nq4b%...
    >> The most economical thing I have seen is cellphone based systems by Sprint
    >> and Verison. We purchased the Verizon system and it gets over 700kb
    >> download speed and over 200kb upload speed by testing with
    >> www.speakeasy.net/speedtest .
    >>
    >> We are using the USB based device "USB720".
    >>
    >> We are an NBC affiated TV Station and use it for reporters to use with a
    >> laptop at remote locations to get on the Net and VPN back into the station
    >> to run the Newsroon System to put in their stories. We are also working
    >> on using the same device with our Satelite Uplink Truck that has a rack
    >> mounted PC built into the truck.
    >>
    >> As with any wireless technology,..the signal strength directly effects the
    >> speed. Too low a signal can cause it to drop the connection. But in
    >> practice we have had pretty good luck with it so far.
    >>
    >> I'm guessing the cost is around $70 a month,..but I'm not the one that
    >> pays the bill.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Phillip Windell
    >> www.wandtv.com
    >>
    >> The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    >> Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    >> -----------------------------------------------------
    >> Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    >> http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html
    >>
    >> Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
    >> http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc
    >>
    >> Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    >>
    >> Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    >> -----------------------------------------------------
    >>
    >> "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    >> news:OsfR%...
    >>> We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline
    >>> (DSL, T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access
    >>> to the wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default,
    >>> satellite. This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we
    >>> have of a max of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing us.
    >>>
    >>> I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    >>> company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    >>> however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    >>> rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Mike Webb
    >>> Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    >>> a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >

    Keep in mind that not all broadband cellular systems are the same (how
    rural are you? do you get cellular phone service? from multiple
    carriers?). One of the major complaints about the Apple iPhone is that
    it uses the ATT/Cingular EDGE system (when it is not within range of an
    802.11 WiFi wireless access point). See
    http://www.ericd.net/staging/2007/07/ru-iphone-edge-moaner-read-on.html

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
     
    Lem, Jul 25, 2007
    #10
  11. Mike Webb

    Mike Webb Guest

    We can get cell phone service fine. The problem with wireless internet is
    the tree lines to our north and south which block line-of-sight to the
    nearest tower. Plus most of those towers are more than 10 miles (linear)
    from our location.

    "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mike Webb wrote:
    >> Sounds like a heckuva deal. I'm not sure how it'd work with a server for
    >> our LAN. I'll look into it, thanks.
    >>
    >> "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%23nq4b%...
    >>> The most economical thing I have seen is cellphone based systems by
    >>> Sprint and Verison. We purchased the Verizon system and it gets over
    >>> 700kb download speed and over 200kb upload speed by testing with
    >>> www.speakeasy.net/speedtest .
    >>>
    >>> We are using the USB based device "USB720".
    >>>
    >>> We are an NBC affiated TV Station and use it for reporters to use with a
    >>> laptop at remote locations to get on the Net and VPN back into the
    >>> station to run the Newsroon System to put in their stories. We are also
    >>> working on using the same device with our Satelite Uplink Truck that has
    >>> a rack mounted PC built into the truck.
    >>>
    >>> As with any wireless technology,..the signal strength directly effects
    >>> the speed. Too low a signal can cause it to drop the connection. But in
    >>> practice we have had pretty good luck with it so far.
    >>>
    >>> I'm guessing the cost is around $70 a month,..but I'm not the one that
    >>> pays the bill.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Phillip Windell
    >>> www.wandtv.com
    >>>
    >>> The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    >>> Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    >>> -----------------------------------------------------
    >>> Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    >>> http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html
    >>>
    >>> Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
    >>> http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc
    >>>
    >>> Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    >>>
    >>> Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    >>> -----------------------------------------------------
    >>>
    >>> "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:OsfR%...
    >>>> We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline
    >>>> (DSL, T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent access
    >>>> to the wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by default,
    >>>> satellite. This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use Policy we
    >>>> have of a max of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is killing
    >>>> us.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    >>>> company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    >>>> however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    >>>> rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Mike Webb
    >>>> Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    >>>> a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    > Keep in mind that not all broadband cellular systems are the same (how
    > rural are you? do you get cellular phone service? from multiple
    > carriers?). One of the major complaints about the Apple iPhone is that it
    > uses the ATT/Cingular EDGE system (when it is not within range of an
    > 802.11 WiFi wireless access point). See
    > http://www.ericd.net/staging/2007/07/ru-iphone-edge-moaner-read-on.html
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
     
    Mike Webb, Jul 26, 2007
    #11
  12. I recommend that you try to get one of these providers to demonstrate the
    product at your physical location to verify the speed at that location. All
    they have to do is bring a laptop out there with them, with the product on
    it, and demonstrate it.

    Cell phone systems are not "monolithic" in the technology they run, just
    because you have a good cell signal in your area doesn't mean it is the
    right type. If you connect one of these broadband cell-based internet
    connections to the "cell" you live in and it is not running the right
    "technology" it will not run at the speed it is capable of running and will
    run at a much slower speed.

    You have to check all that out before you buy anything.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------

    "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > We can get cell phone service fine. The problem with wireless internet is
    > the tree lines to our north and south which block line-of-sight to the
    > nearest tower. Plus most of those towers are more than 10 miles (linear)
    > from our location.
    >
    > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Mike Webb wrote:
    >>> Sounds like a heckuva deal. I'm not sure how it'd work with a server for
    >>> our LAN. I'll look into it, thanks.
    >>>
    >>> "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:%23nq4b%...
    >>>> The most economical thing I have seen is cellphone based systems by
    >>>> Sprint and Verison. We purchased the Verizon system and it gets over
    >>>> 700kb download speed and over 200kb upload speed by testing with
    >>>> www.speakeasy.net/speedtest .
    >>>>
    >>>> We are using the USB based device "USB720".
    >>>>
    >>>> We are an NBC affiated TV Station and use it for reporters to use with
    >>>> a laptop at remote locations to get on the Net and VPN back into the
    >>>> station to run the Newsroon System to put in their stories. We are
    >>>> also working on using the same device with our Satelite Uplink Truck
    >>>> that has a rack mounted PC built into the truck.
    >>>>
    >>>> As with any wireless technology,..the signal strength directly effects
    >>>> the speed. Too low a signal can cause it to drop the connection. But
    >>>> in practice we have had pretty good luck with it so far.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm guessing the cost is around $70 a month,..but I'm not the one that
    >>>> pays the bill.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Phillip Windell
    >>>> www.wandtv.com
    >>>>
    >>>> The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    >>>> Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    >>>> -----------------------------------------------------
    >>>> Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    >>>> http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server
    >>>> 2004
    >>>> http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc
    >>>>
    >>>> Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    >>>> http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    >>>>
    >>>> Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    >>>> http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    >>>> -----------------------------------------------------
    >>>>
    >>>> "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:OsfR%...
    >>>>> We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline
    >>>>> (DSL, T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent
    >>>>> access to the wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by
    >>>>> default, satellite. This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use
    >>>>> Policy we have of a max of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average is
    >>>>> killing us.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    >>>>> company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    >>>>> however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could help
    >>>>> rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Mike Webb
    >>>>> Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    >>>>> a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Keep in mind that not all broadband cellular systems are the same (how
    >> rural are you? do you get cellular phone service? from multiple
    >> carriers?). One of the major complaints about the Apple iPhone is that
    >> it uses the ATT/Cingular EDGE system (when it is not within range of an
    >> 802.11 WiFi wireless access point). See
    >> http://www.ericd.net/staging/2007/07/ru-iphone-edge-moaner-read-on.html
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

    >
    >
     
    Phillip Windell, Jul 26, 2007
    #12
  13. Mike Webb

    Mike Webb Guest

    Good advice, thanks.

    "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    news:eK%...
    >I recommend that you try to get one of these providers to demonstrate the
    >product at your physical location to verify the speed at that location.
    >All they have to do is bring a laptop out there with them, with the product
    >on it, and demonstrate it.
    >
    > Cell phone systems are not "monolithic" in the technology they run, just
    > because you have a good cell signal in your area doesn't mean it is the
    > right type. If you connect one of these broadband cell-based internet
    > connections to the "cell" you live in and it is not running the right
    > "technology" it will not run at the speed it is capable of running and
    > will run at a much slower speed.
    >
    > You have to check all that out before you buy anything.
    >
    > --
    > Phillip Windell
    > www.wandtv.com
    >
    > The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    > Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    > -----------------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> We can get cell phone service fine. The problem with wireless internet
    >> is the tree lines to our north and south which block line-of-sight to the
    >> nearest tower. Plus most of those towers are more than 10 miles (linear)
    >> from our location.
    >>
    >> "Lem" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Mike Webb wrote:
    >>>> Sounds like a heckuva deal. I'm not sure how it'd work with a server
    >>>> for our LAN. I'll look into it, thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:%23nq4b%...
    >>>>> The most economical thing I have seen is cellphone based systems by
    >>>>> Sprint and Verison. We purchased the Verizon system and it gets over
    >>>>> 700kb download speed and over 200kb upload speed by testing with
    >>>>> www.speakeasy.net/speedtest .
    >>>>>
    >>>>> We are using the USB based device "USB720".
    >>>>>
    >>>>> We are an NBC affiated TV Station and use it for reporters to use with
    >>>>> a laptop at remote locations to get on the Net and VPN back into the
    >>>>> station to run the Newsroon System to put in their stories. We are
    >>>>> also working on using the same device with our Satelite Uplink Truck
    >>>>> that has a rack mounted PC built into the truck.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> As with any wireless technology,..the signal strength directly effects
    >>>>> the speed. Too low a signal can cause it to drop the connection. But
    >>>>> in practice we have had pretty good luck with it so far.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'm guessing the cost is around $70 a month,..but I'm not the one that
    >>>>> pays the bill.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Phillip Windell
    >>>>> www.wandtv.com
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    >>>>> Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    >>>>> -----------------------------------------------------
    >>>>> Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    >>>>> http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server
    >>>>> 2004
    >>>>> http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    >>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
    >>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
    >>>>> -----------------------------------------------------
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Mike Webb" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:OsfR%...
    >>>>>> We are in a remote rural area - remote in that we can't get landline
    >>>>>> (DSL, T1, etc.) without prohibitive cost, and tree lines prevent
    >>>>>> access to the wireless internet towers in the area - who uses, by
    >>>>>> default, satellite. This is okay, but we'd like better. The Fair Use
    >>>>>> Policy we have of a max of 17GB download per 30-day rolling average
    >>>>>> is killing us.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I've heard of NLOS (non-line-of-sight) wireless, and there's even a
    >>>>>> company nearby that offers it -- we're too far from their coverage
    >>>>>> however. Anyone know of new technologies/capabilities that could
    >>>>>> help rural users like us, either now or in the (near) future?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Mike Webb
    >>>>>> Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust, Inc.
    >>>>>> a 501 (c)(3) conservation non-profit organization
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Keep in mind that not all broadband cellular systems are the same (how
    >>> rural are you? do you get cellular phone service? from multiple
    >>> carriers?). One of the major complaints about the Apple iPhone is that
    >>> it uses the ATT/Cingular EDGE system (when it is not within range of an
    >>> 802.11 WiFi wireless access point). See
    >>> http://www.ericd.net/staging/2007/07/ru-iphone-edge-moaner-read-on.html
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >>>
    >>> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Mike Webb, Jul 26, 2007
    #13
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