Slideshow question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Inez, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. Inez

    Inez Guest

    I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    screen. Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format
    negatives and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I
    should reduce them. Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the
    projector until it is too late to make changes, so I can't
    experiment.

    I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    an image to be projected? I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    that matters.
     
    Inez, Mar 11, 2009
    #1
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  2. Inez

    ray Guest

    On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:53:57 -0700, Inez wrote:

    > I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    > screen. Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format negatives
    > and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I should reduce
    > them. Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the projector until it is
    > too late to make changes, so I can't experiment.
    >
    > I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    > an image to be projected? I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    > that matters.


    Try the resolution of the projecting device - anything more than that
    will basically do you do good.
     
    ray, Mar 11, 2009
    #2
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  3. Inez

    Inez Guest

    On Mar 11, 10:03 am, ray <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:53:57 -0700, Inez wrote:
    > > I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    > > screen.  Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format negatives
    > > and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I should reduce
    > > them.  Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the projector until it is
    > > too late to make changes, so I can't experiment.

    >
    > > I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    > > an image to be projected?  I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    > > that matters.

    >
    > Try the resolution of the projecting device - anything more than that
    > will basically do you do good.


    Ah! Good, that makes sense!
     
    Inez, Mar 11, 2009
    #3
  4. Inez

    Bert Hyman Guest

    In
    news:
    Inez <> wrote:


    > I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    > screen. Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format
    > negatives and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I
    > should reduce them. Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the
    > projector until it is too late to make changes, so I can't
    > experiment.
    >
    > I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    > an image to be projected? I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    > that matters.


    Yes, it matters. You could simply drop your image files into PowerPoint
    and resize them there, but PP stores the files in their original size
    and resizes them to your specifications each time you show the slide.

    Depending on what kind of computer you're using to run your slide show,
    your presentation could take a very long time to load due to the large
    file size and then the slides with the large images will take another
    eternity to display as PP resizes them.

    [At least that's what PP in Office 2000 did; maybe later versions are
    smarter about this]

    On the other hand, resizing your images outside of PP is an iffy
    proposition, since you need to fit your images to fit the slide as
    you're composing your presentation anyway.

    If you know what the resolution of your projector is, resize as close to
    that as you can, but you'll probably still have to tweak the dimensions
    after you drop the image into a PP slide. I'd make the image slightly
    too big and let PP shrink it, rather than having PP enlarge it.

    --
    Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN
     
    Bert Hyman, Mar 11, 2009
    #4
  5. Bert Hyman wrote:
    > In
    > news:
    > Inez <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    >> screen. Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format
    >> negatives and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I
    >> should reduce them. Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the
    >> projector until it is too late to make changes, so I can't
    >> experiment.
    >>
    >> I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    >> an image to be projected? I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    >> that matters.

    >
    > Yes, it matters. You could simply drop your image files into PowerPoint
    > and resize them there, but PP stores the files in their original size
    > and resizes them to your specifications each time you show the slide.
    >
    > Depending on what kind of computer you're using to run your slide show,
    > your presentation could take a very long time to load due to the large
    > file size and then the slides with the large images will take another
    > eternity to display as PP resizes them.
    >
    > [At least that's what PP in Office 2000 did; maybe later versions are
    > smarter about this]
    >
    > On the other hand, resizing your images outside of PP is an iffy
    > proposition, since you need to fit your images to fit the slide as
    > you're composing your presentation anyway.
    >
    > If you know what the resolution of your projector is, resize as close to
    > that as you can, but you'll probably still have to tweak the dimensions
    > after you drop the image into a PP slide. I'd make the image slightly
    > too big and let PP shrink it, rather than having PP enlarge it.


    Why not size the images to the exact proportions and orientation of the
    projector at its precise resolution?

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Mar 11, 2009
    #5
  6. Inez

    Bert Hyman Guest

    In news:gp8sgk$nj6$ John McWilliams
    <> wrote:

    > Why not size the images to the exact proportions and orientation of
    > the projector at its precise resolution?


    The OP said he's doing a PowerPoint presentation. A PP slide will always
    have borders and the like which eat a bit of real estate.

    [I'm not a PP wizard; there might be a way to put raw images into a PP
    presentation that I don't know about]

    --
    Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN
     
    Bert Hyman, Mar 11, 2009
    #6
  7. Inez

    Inez Guest

    On Mar 11, 11:15 am, Bert Hyman <> wrote:
    > Innews:gp8sgk$nj6$ McWilliams
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > > Why not size the images to the exact proportions and orientation of
    > > the projector at its precise resolution?

    >
    > The OP said he's doing a PowerPoint presentation. A PP slide will always
    > have borders and the like which eat a bit of real estate.


    The OP is actually female, but appreciates the advice all the same :)

    > [I'm not a PP wizard; there might be a way to put raw images into a PP
    > presentation that I don't know about]
    >
    > --
    > Bert Hyman      St. Paul, MN    
     
    Inez, Mar 11, 2009
    #7
  8. Inez

    J. Clarke Guest

    Bert Hyman wrote:
    > In news:gp8sgk$nj6$ John McWilliams
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Why not size the images to the exact proportions and orientation of
    >> the projector at its precise resolution?

    >
    > The OP said he's doing a PowerPoint presentation. A PP slide will
    > always have borders and the like which eat a bit of real estate.


    Only if the designer of the presentation wants them to. The entire area of
    the slide can be used for whatever content one is displaying.

    If you're getting borders odds are that you have the aspect ratio of the
    slides set to something different from what the monitor is displaying. By
    default Powerpoint slides fill a 4:3 screen--there are presets (in the
    latest version anyway) for 16:9 and 16:10 in addition to the usual gamut of
    paper sizes, and if none of those do it for you you can set a custom size.

    > [I'm not a PP wizard; there might be a way to put raw images into a PP
    > presentation that I don't know about]


    If there's a codec on the system for the format in which they're stored it
    treats them like any other image (assuming of course that the codec is
    designed accoriding to the rules for Windows codecs and is not proprietary
    to a particular application).

    If you do an "insert object" and "from file" it will even use a third party
    application to open and display the file (assuming that the application has
    been written with the proper "hooks" to allow it to be used in that
    fashion).
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 11, 2009
    #8
  9. Inez

    J. Clarke Guest

    John McWilliams wrote:
    > Bert Hyman wrote:
    >> In news:gp8sgk$nj6$ John McWilliams
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Why not size the images to the exact proportions and orientation of
    >>> the projector at its precise resolution?

    >>
    >> The OP said he's doing a PowerPoint presentation. A PP slide will
    >> always have borders and the like which eat a bit of real estate.

    >
    > Nonetheless, there must be an optimum size for PPT shows, one which
    > requires little or no further interpolation by PPT. And one would
    > sharpen to that.
    >>
    >> [I'm not a PP wizard; there might be a way to put raw images into a
    >> PP presentation that I don't know about]

    >
    > Even if one could display RAW images via PPT, one shouldn't: you're
    > causing PPT a lot of work, and output would not be top quality
    > possible, as sharpening would be poor in all likelihood.


    I wouldn't knock myself out trying to get perfect results unless it's going
    to be shown in a commercial theater (by "commercial theater" I mean the kind
    of place where you pay ten bucks plus the price of popcorn to see
    "Watchmen"). Odds are that they won't have whatever projector they told you
    that they were going to have. Better to tweak it so that it looks "good
    enough" at any resolution than to tune the Hell out of it for one particular
    one.

    On the other hand, one might want to do both 4:3 and 16:9 or 16:10 versions
    so that if wide screen is available you'll be able to make the best use of
    it.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 11, 2009
    #9
  10. Inez

    ray Guest

    On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 18:15:46 +0000, Bert Hyman wrote:

    > In news:gp8sgk$nj6$ John McWilliams
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Why not size the images to the exact proportions and orientation of the
    >> projector at its precise resolution?

    >
    > The OP said he's doing a PowerPoint presentation. A PP slide will always
    > have borders and the like which eat a bit of real estate.


    Pretty stupid app, isn't it? Should be a way to do your presentation full
    screen.


    >
    > [I'm not a PP wizard; there might be a way to put raw images into a PP
    > presentation that I don't know about]
     
    ray, Mar 11, 2009
    #10
  11. Inez

    Charles Guest

    "Inez" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    > screen. Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format
    > negatives and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I
    > should reduce them. Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the
    > projector until it is too late to make changes, so I can't
    > experiment.
    >
    > I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    > an image to be projected? I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    > that matters.


    Put the shots into PP and then use the resizing dots to fill the screen.
    There is also a crop tool available. Then right-click the picture, go to
    format, then select compress and then set the resolution to "Print." This
    will muchly reduce the size of the PP show, yet give plenty of resolution
    for any viewing method.
     
    Charles, Mar 11, 2009
    #11
  12. Inez

    Guest

    On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:53:57 -0700 (PDT), in rec.photo.digital Inez
    <> wrote:

    >I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    >screen. Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format
    >negatives and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I
    >should reduce them. Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the
    >projector until it is too late to make changes, so I can't
    >experiment.
    >
    >I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    >an image to be projected? I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    >that matters.


    Others have addressed the image resizing issue. If a may back up a second,
    are you sure PP is the best tool for the job? It wasn't clear if you have
    anything other than images to present. If that is the case you might be
    better off using an image viewer, such as Irfanview to run a pure image
    slideshow, instead of using PP.
     
    , Mar 11, 2009
    #12
  13. Inez

    Mark Roberts Guest

    ray wrote:

    >On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 18:15:46 +0000, Bert Hyman wrote:
    >
    >> In news:gp8sgk$nj6$ John McWilliams
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Why not size the images to the exact proportions and orientation of the
    >>> projector at its precise resolution?

    >>
    >> The OP said he's doing a PowerPoint presentation. A PP slide will always
    >> have borders and the like which eat a bit of real estate.

    >
    >Pretty stupid app, isn't it? Should be a way to do your presentation full
    >screen.


    There is. You place your image into the PowerPoint "slide" as a
    background image. When you run the presentation it displays as full
    screen, though you'll have black areas left/right or top/bottom if
    your image doesn't match the aspect ratio of the screen (but that's
    preferable to either cropping or stretching, IMO).




    --
    Mark Roberts Photography & Multimedia
    www.robertstech.com
     
    Mark Roberts, Mar 11, 2009
    #13
  14. Mark Roberts wrote:
    []
    > There is. You place your image into the PowerPoint "slide" as a
    > background image. When you run the presentation it displays as full
    > screen, though you'll have black areas left/right or top/bottom if
    > your image doesn't match the aspect ratio of the screen (but that's
    > preferable to either cropping or stretching, IMO).


    That's an excellent suggestion, Mark. Only one snag with my PowerPoint
    2000 - the image is resized to fill the 4:3 aspect ratio of the slide, so
    the image aspect ratio is lost. I guess your PP is a more recent version,
    or is there an option I've missed?

    BTW: I did write my own very simple SlideShow program:
    http://www.satsignal.eu/software/imaging.html#SlideShow

    Thanks,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Mar 12, 2009
    #14
  15. Inez

    Guest

    On Mar 11, 12:53 pm, Inez <> wrote:
    > I want to do a powerpoint slide show which will be projected on a
    > screen.  Quite a few of the images are scans of medium format
    > negatives and are of gianormous size, and I am not sure how much I
    > should reduce them.  Unfortunately I won't have a shot using the
    > projector until it is too late to make changes, so I can't
    > experiment.
    >
    > I know this is a rather nebulous question, but what is a good size for
    > an image to be projected?  I'll probably resize them in photoshop, if
    > that matters.


    I do a lot of scanning for PowerPoint, mostly I scan the images,
    generally 35mm slides, at 1200 ppi then set the image size for 10 x
    6.667 x100ppi for landscape images and 8x5.3 x100ppi for portrait. My
    scanner seems to do better scans at 1200ppi than at 800ppi which would
    mean no resizing. For 2 1/4 images I'd scan at 600ppi and see what
    happens. Again use 8 inch high as the size factor at 100ppi.

    Tom
     
    , Mar 12, 2009
    #15
  16. Inez

    Mark Roberts Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:

    >Mark Roberts wrote:
    >[]
    >> There is. You place your image into the PowerPoint "slide" as a
    >> background image. When you run the presentation it displays as full
    >> screen, though you'll have black areas left/right or top/bottom if
    >> your image doesn't match the aspect ratio of the screen (but that's
    >> preferable to either cropping or stretching, IMO).

    >
    >That's an excellent suggestion, Mark. Only one snag with my PowerPoint
    >2000 - the image is resized to fill the 4:3 aspect ratio of the slide, so
    >the image aspect ratio is lost. I guess your PP is a more recent version,
    >or is there an option I've missed?


    Actually, my home computer has PowerPoint 1997!
    But it behaves exactly as you describe - I didn't notice at first
    because I used an image that was 3:4 aspect ratio to begin with *and*
    (thankfully) PowerPoint doesn't do any further stretching when you
    display the finished presentation on a widescreen monitor.

    So the solution in PowerPoint, it seems, is for you to do your own
    cropping & resizing to get your image into a 3:4 aspect ratio and
    *then* use it as a background image.

    >BTW: I did write my own very simple SlideShow program:
    > http://www.satsignal.eu/software/imaging.html#SlideShow


    Interesting. I'll have a look.


    --
    Mark Roberts Photography & Multimedia
    www.robertstech.com
     
    Mark Roberts, Mar 12, 2009
    #16
  17. Inez

    J. Clarke Guest

    Mark Roberts wrote:
    > David J Taylor wrote:
    >
    >> Mark Roberts wrote:
    >> []
    >>> There is. You place your image into the PowerPoint "slide" as a
    >>> background image. When you run the presentation it displays as full
    >>> screen, though you'll have black areas left/right or top/bottom if
    >>> your image doesn't match the aspect ratio of the screen (but that's
    >>> preferable to either cropping or stretching, IMO).

    >>
    >> That's an excellent suggestion, Mark. Only one snag with my
    >> PowerPoint 2000 - the image is resized to fill the 4:3 aspect ratio
    >> of the slide, so the image aspect ratio is lost. I guess your PP is
    >> a more recent version, or is there an option I've missed?

    >
    > Actually, my home computer has PowerPoint 1997!
    > But it behaves exactly as you describe - I didn't notice at first
    > because I used an image that was 3:4 aspect ratio to begin with *and*
    > (thankfully) PowerPoint doesn't do any further stretching when you
    > display the finished presentation on a widescreen monitor.
    >
    > So the solution in PowerPoint, it seems, is for you to do your own
    > cropping & resizing to get your image into a 3:4 aspect ratio and
    > *then* use it as a background image.
    >
    >> BTW: I did write my own very simple SlideShow program:
    >> http://www.satsignal.eu/software/imaging.html#SlideShow

    >
    > Interesting. I'll have a look.


    In Powerpoint 2003 and 2007 one can just "insert picture" then drag it
    around however one wants to and resize however one wants to--to resize while
    not changing aspect ratio use one of the corner buttons to resize rather
    than one in the center of an edge. No need to make it a background.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 12, 2009
    #17
  18. J. Clarke wrote:
    []
    > In Powerpoint 2003 and 2007 one can just "insert picture" then drag it
    > around however one wants to and resize however one wants to--to
    > resize while not changing aspect ratio use one of the corner buttons
    > to resize rather than one in the center of an edge. No need to make
    > it a background.


    Same in earlier versions, but it would be neater if you could even avoid
    the resizing and positioning.

    I'm surprised someone hasn't come along and told us how Open Office can,
    of course, do this and far more. Even if it can, it makes a right mess of
    importing TIFF files, getting them far too dark. Check before using.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Mar 12, 2009
    #18
  19. Inez

    J. Clarke Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    > J. Clarke wrote:
    > []
    >> In Powerpoint 2003 and 2007 one can just "insert picture" then drag
    >> it around however one wants to and resize however one wants to--to
    >> resize while not changing aspect ratio use one of the corner buttons
    >> to resize rather than one in the center of an edge. No need to make
    >> it a background.

    >
    > Same in earlier versions, but it would be neater if you could even
    > avoid the resizing and positioning.


    Best bet, of course, is to size to the resolution of the monitor you're
    going to be using, if you have that information. But someone on the road
    doing presentations with client-provided projectors doesn't usually have
    that luxury.

    > I'm surprised someone hasn't come along and told us how Open Office
    > can, of course, do this and far more. Even if it can, it makes a
    > right mess of importing TIFF files, getting them far too dark. Check
    > before using.


    Just for hohos tried it with OpenOffice and it works pretty much the same
    way that Powerpoint does, with JPEGs anyway.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 12, 2009
    #19
  20. J. Clarke wrote:
    > David J Taylor wrote:

    []
    >> I'm surprised someone hasn't come along and told us how Open Office
    >> can, of course, do this and far more. Even if it can, it makes a
    >> right mess of importing TIFF files, getting them far too dark. Check
    >> before using.

    >
    > Just for hohos tried it with OpenOffice and it works pretty much the
    > same way that Powerpoint does, with JPEGs anyway.


    Yes, that was my experience as well.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Mar 12, 2009
    #20
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