Slide Scanning

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RSchultz, Sep 18, 2005.

  1. RSchultz

    RSchultz Guest

    Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    good results with doing this process?
     
    RSchultz, Sep 18, 2005
    #1
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  2. RSchultz

    Stacey Guest

    RSchultz wrote:

    > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.


    Is your time worth anything? If so factor that into the cost.

    > Have you had really
    > good results with doing this process?


    Yes but it can be time consuming

    --

    Stacey
     
    Stacey, Sep 18, 2005
    #2
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  3. On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 03:35:53 +0100, RSchultz wrote:

    > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.


    It is a time consuming job. Each slides takes 3-5 minutes for scaning in a
    good scanner with high resolution & digital ICE (it removes dust marks)

    > Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    > good results with doing this process?


    You have to post-process to get the best results.


    --

    Gautam Majumdar

    Please send e-mails to
     
    Gautam Majumdar, Sep 18, 2005
    #3
  4. RSchultz wrote:
    > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    > Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    > good results with doing this process?
    >


    I'm interested in this topic, too, and also have a number of slides to
    scan in the low 1000's. I have Photoshop, and would do this in my spare
    time so time and post-processing are not issues. What models of slide
    scanners have people used with good results? Are there any flatbed
    scanners with slide/negative scanning capabilities that are any good, or
    should I just forget about those?
     
    Bruce Coryell, Sep 18, 2005
    #4
  5. RSchultz

    Jasen Guest

    "Bruce Coryell" <> wrote in message
    news:SgdXe.1344$...
    > RSchultz wrote:
    > > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    > > Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    > > good results with doing this process?
    > >

    >
    > I'm interested in this topic, too, and also have a number of slides to
    > scan in the low 1000's. I have Photoshop, and would do this in my spare
    > time so time and post-processing are not issues. What models of slide
    > scanners have people used with good results? Are there any flatbed
    > scanners with slide/negative scanning capabilities that are any good, or
    > should I just forget about those?


    I bought the Epson Perfection 4180 a earlier this year and I get very good
    results. I highly recommend it.
    If you have a heap of slides and don't want to pay big money to get them
    scanned then this is the next best thing, for me at least. I did it in my
    spare time and had to do some post processing but I didn't mind spending the
    time doing that as a few shots actually were made readily available in the
    digital form and I ended up selling them to people. Those same photos were
    sitting for a few years in my cupboard, unseen and unavailable for easy
    viewing or cheap printing. So, go, get yourself a scanner, you'll be
    pleased you did. I don't know much about the other brands, but Canon is
    good too. I think at the time I bought the Epson it was getting better
    reviews and was a bit cheaper too.
    Hope this helps.
     
    Jasen, Sep 18, 2005
    #5
  6. In article <do4Xe.6941$Zg5.2273@trndny05>, says...
    > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    > Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    > good results with doing this process?
    >
    >

    The Minolta 5400 is currently the best scanner for the price for 35mm.
    Some people prefer Nikon, though.
    The real question is why you want to scan the slides.
    Do think digital will be more archival?
    Do you want to make prints or a web site from the scans?
    Do you want to be able to index them?
    If you plan to display, how big? Inkjet or some other technology.

    In general I suggest avoiding wholesale scanning, unless your originals
    are fading or otherwise deteriorating. There is no guarantee that the
    digital format will hold up better than film, especially if stored
    correctly.
    Just scan those you have an immediate need for and keep the rest as
    is.

    --
    Robert D Feinman
    Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    http://robertdfeinman.com
    mail:
     
    Robert Feinman, Sep 18, 2005
    #6
  7. RSchultz

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <SgdXe.1344$>,
    Bruce Coryell <> wrote:

    > RSchultz wrote:
    > > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    > > Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    > > good results with doing this process?
    > >

    >
    > I'm interested in this topic, too, and also have a number of slides to
    > scan in the low 1000's. I have Photoshop, and would do this in my spare
    > time so time and post-processing are not issues. What models of slide
    > scanners have people used with good results? Are there any flatbed
    > scanners with slide/negative scanning capabilities that are any good, or
    > should I just forget about those?


    The Braun 4000 scans at up to 3600 x 3600. It uses straight or round
    Braun slide trays, has ICE and ROC built-in and can scan up to 100 glass
    or glassless slides fully automatically into PS. Works with MAC and PC
    on Firewire or USB.

    Just put the slide tray into the scanner, tell it which slides to scan
    and at what res and come back two hours later and they are all done.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
     
    Bob Salomon, Sep 18, 2005
    #7
  8. RSchultz

    Patzt Guest

    Up until now, I've scanned about 1400 slides with my HP 5470c and have
    been happy with the results most of the time.
     
    Patzt, Sep 18, 2005
    #8
  9. RSchultz

    clw Guest

    In article <do4Xe.6941$Zg5.2273@trndny05>, RSchultz <>
    wrote:

    > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    > Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    > good results with doing this process?


    I bought a Nikon Coolscan V ED (600.00) and scanned about 2000 slides
    and an equal number of negative film strips. Excellent results. To
    save time I did not use all the built in corrections available, thinking
    I could clean up almost anything with something like Photo Shop elements
    and Polaroid Dust and Scratches filter if I ever wanted to make prints.
    I did make an effort to remove as much dust before scanning (there is
    ample time to do this while the prior slide or strip is scanning.)

    The biggest drawback to this is the time it takes. The great result is
    that you can now organize all your photos, slide or negatives, into such
    things as where, when, who, event etc. This makes for some nice DVD's
    you can take to reunions etc and play on someone's TV for a group
    without needing a projector etc.

    One last thing, after you finish doing this, you can then sell the
    scanner to someone who also wants to do this and have enough to buy a
    high quality flat bed scanner or more RAM for your PhotoShop work.
    --
    Panta rei
     
    clw, Sep 18, 2005
    #9
  10. RSchultz

    Labrat Guest

    The Nikon Coolscan scanners have an optional slide feeder attachment which
    allows you to load up to 50 slides, start things going, and walk away. The
    system will scan each of the slides in succession while you are off doing
    other things. The newer models are fairly expensive, but the older ones are
    readily available on Ebay for a reasonable price.

    LabRat


    "RSchultz" <> wrote in message
    news:do4Xe.6941$Zg5.2273@trndny05...
    > Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    > are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    > Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    > good results with doing this process?
    >
     
    Labrat, Sep 18, 2005
    #10
  11. <snip>
    >> Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know there
    >> are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide scanner.
    >> Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you had really
    >> good results with doing this process?


    I have one of the first-generation 1800 dpi Pacific Image slide scanners
    which works with USB1 (Jessops, UK). I find that the results are variable,
    and the image quality is usually greatly degraded from a 35mm slide - with
    occasional exceptions, which are fantastically good. I can't work out why.
    For importing into Powerpoint, however, or showing on a TV, (apart from the
    image having rather too many pixels, and a little of the focus sharpness
    being lost) the device is fine. The occasional brilliant results turn out to
    print equally well (on photo glossy paper and an inkjet) at A4 size, and
    sometimes even up to A3 - the failures won't. It does like slides with
    strong vibrant primary colours. I once scanned 100 slides, and it was a slow
    and frustrating experience. It rarely fails to give me an image adequate for
    a Powerpoint presentation if the slide was reasonable to begin with.

    EB
     
    Edward N Bromhead, Sep 18, 2005
    #11
  12. RSchultz

    Frank ess Guest

    Robert Feinman wrote:
    > In article <do4Xe.6941$Zg5.2273@trndny05>, says...
    >> Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know
    >> there are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a
    >> slide
    >> scanner. Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have
    >> you had really good results with doing this process?
    >>
    >>

    > The Minolta 5400 is currently the best scanner for the price for
    > 35mm.
    > Some people prefer Nikon, though.
    > The real question is why you want to scan the slides.
    > Do think digital will be more archival?
    > Do you want to make prints or a web site from the scans?
    > Do you want to be able to index them?
    > If you plan to display, how big? Inkjet or some other technology.
    >
    > In general I suggest avoiding wholesale scanning, unless your
    > originals are fading or otherwise deteriorating. There is no
    > guarantee that the digital format will hold up better than film,
    > especially if stored correctly.
    > Just scan those you have an immediate need for and keep the rest as
    > is.


    This brings up an aspect of the process that inhibits my progress in
    committing to digital the thousands of slides in my film archive:
    selection of the ones to bother with.

    If you choose to pre-select, somehow you have to be able to eyeball a
    decent representation to see if it is in focus, and if it matches
    whatever other criteria are important to you. If you do that before
    scanning, it lightens that part of the load. If you bulk/batch scan,
    you spend the selection time on the computer.

    My early compromise was box-by-box scanning, figuring I'd have the raw
    material in case I missed some useful detail in a pre-screen. No
    surprise: There were many, many more useless slides than 'keepers'
    when I got around to post-processing. Which took a while, no ICE and
    all.

    So, I started projecting the slides, carousel after carousel, clip
    after clip, box after box, and making an inventory with quality-coded
    notes. Now that was drudgery. I got about 20-25% through the mountain
    in a week-long spate of endurance viewing, when something else came up
    and the projector and storage boxes got moved from action central. I
    can see them from here, under their clear plastic dustcover. It's been
    a year.

    Somewhere in there is a salvageable picture of John Watson at Long
    Beach against the Queen Mary backdrop; Danny Sullivan pinching Al
    Unser, Jr's seat; Bobby Rahal and Jim Trueman talking CART-car setup
    as they watch practice at Riverside's Turn Four. _Et cetera_.

    So, machinery isn't the only considerable factor in deciding to embark
    on a slide-scanning effort. It's all manageable, one way or another,
    but must be pushed and pulled to fit into your scheme of needs, wants,
    capabilities, and resources. You'll be paying for it one way or
    another, money or time and effort.

    I'm beginning to hear myself working up to the same old theme: you
    (we) need to train an intern or part-time assistant to do the job.


    --
    Frank ess
    "One time, I got up the next morning and looked in the mirror
    and there were two of them up in my hair."
    - JEAN LEMEAUX, on the travails of removing those little stickers from
    her
    fruits and vegetables.
     
    Frank ess, Sep 18, 2005
    #12
  13. On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 20:28:39 +0100, Edward N Bromhead wrote:

    > <snip>
    >>> Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know
    >>> there are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide
    >>> scanner. Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you
    >>> had really good results with doing this process?

    >
    > I have one of the first-generation 1800 dpi Pacific Image slide scanners
    > which works with USB1 (Jessops, UK). I find that the results are
    > variable, and the image quality is usually greatly degraded from a 35mm
    > slide - with occasional exceptions, which are fantastically good. I
    > can't work out why. For importing into Powerpoint, however, or showing
    > on a TV, (apart from the image having rather too many pixels, and a
    > little of the focus sharpness being lost) the device is fine. The
    > occasional brilliant results turn out to print equally well (on photo
    > glossy paper and an inkjet) at A4 size, and sometimes even up to A3 -
    > the failures won't. It does like slides with strong vibrant primary
    > colours. I once scanned 100 slides, and it was a slow and frustrating
    > experience. It rarely fails to give me an image adequate for a
    > Powerpoint presentation if the slide was reasonable to begin with.
    >

    I have scanned over 5000 slides using Jessops (Pacific Image) Pro3 scanner
    which has 3600 resolution with built-in ICE & ROC, with fairly good results.
    Some post processing was needed virtually for all scans but not too much.
    Still, it took me well over 6 months.

    --

    Gautam Majumdar

    Please send e-mails to
     
    Gautam Majumdar, Sep 19, 2005
    #13
  14. RSchultz

    Mike Guest

    "Gautam Majumdar" <> a écrit dans le message de
    news: 2hDXe.901$...
    > On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 20:28:39 +0100, Edward N Bromhead wrote:
    >
    >> <snip>
    >>>> Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know
    >>>> there are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide
    >>>> scanner. Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you
    >>>> had really good results with doing this process?

    >>
    >> I have one of the first-generation 1800 dpi Pacific Image slide scanners
    >> which works with USB1 (Jessops, UK). I find that the results are
    >> variable, and the image quality is usually greatly degraded from a 35mm
    >> slide - with occasional exceptions,



    I suggest to update the software with the very last online (free).
    It is quite a new software, much, much more elaborate, worth to try.

    Here is the url:
    http://www.scanace.com/en/product/1800u.php

    Downloads are here:
    http://www.scanace.com/en/download.php


    Mike
     
    Mike, Sep 19, 2005
    #14
  15. RSchultz

    Larry Guest

    "Gautam Majumdar" <> wrote ...
    > On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 20:28:39 +0100, Edward N Bromhead wrote:
    >
    >> <snip>
    >>>> Any suggestions on how to convert about 1500 35mm slides?? I know
    >>>> there are services that do this. I am considering purchasing a slide
    >>>> scanner. Should I stay away from any particular brand/kind? Have you
    >>>> had really good results with doing this process?

    >>
    >> I have one of the first-generation 1800 dpi Pacific Image slide scanners
    >> which works with USB1 (Jessops, UK). I find that the results are
    >> variable, and the image quality is usually greatly degraded from a 35mm
    >> slide - with occasional exceptions, which are fantastically good. I
    >> can't work out why. For importing into Powerpoint, however, or showing
    >> on a TV, (apart from the image having rather too many pixels, and a
    >> little of the focus sharpness being lost) the device is fine. The
    >> occasional brilliant results turn out to print equally well (on photo
    >> glossy paper and an inkjet) at A4 size, and sometimes even up to A3 -
    >> the failures won't. It does like slides with strong vibrant primary
    >> colours. I once scanned 100 slides, and it was a slow and frustrating
    >> experience. It rarely fails to give me an image adequate for a
    >> Powerpoint presentation if the slide was reasonable to begin with.
    >>

    > I have scanned over 5000 slides using Jessops (Pacific Image) Pro3 scanner
    > which has 3600 resolution with built-in ICE & ROC, with fairly good
    > results.
    > Some post processing was needed virtually for all scans but not too much.
    > Still, it took me well over 6 months.


    I have a Canoscan FS4000US 4000 dpi film and slide scanner.
    It does a great job, but taking only 4 slides at a time makes it slow going.
    I believe Nikon units can handle batches of 50.
     
    Larry, Sep 20, 2005
    #15
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