Slide film ratio

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Nov 22, 2008.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector. I'll
    have slides made from .jpgs.

    This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    best on a slide?

    (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    ..jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 22, 2008
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    Ray Fischer Guest

    tony cooper <> wrote:
    >I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector.


    Oooo! They still make those?!?

    > I'll
    >have slides made from .jpgs.
    >
    >This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    >it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    >best on a slide?


    The standard image size for slides is 24 by 36 mm (the film itself is
    35mm wide but there's space for sprocket holes).

    That's 2:3 for the math-challenged.

    --
    Ray Fischer
     
    Ray Fischer, Nov 22, 2008
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    N Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector. I'll
    > have slides made from .jpgs.
    >
    > This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    > it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    > best on a slide?
    >
    > (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    > the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    > and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    > .jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    > 20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida



    Think about the target screen dimensions and the requirements from the
    company doing the jpg to slide conversion.
     
    N, Nov 23, 2008
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    N Guest

    "Caesar Romano" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 18:19:01 -0500, tony cooper
    > <> wrote Re Slide film ratio:
    >
    >>This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    >>it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    >>best on a slide?

    >
    > Slides have a 1.5:1 or 3:2 aspect ratio.
    > http://www.cis.hawaii.edu/GraphicsHome/ServiceBureau/SBSlide.html
    >



    I have hundreds that don't.
     
    N, Nov 23, 2008
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On 22 Nov 2008 23:46:10 GMT, (Ray Fischer) wrote:

    >tony cooper <> wrote:
    >>I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector.

    >
    >Oooo! They still make those?!?
    >
    >> I'll
    >>have slides made from .jpgs.
    >>
    >>This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    >>it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    >>best on a slide?

    >
    >The standard image size for slides is 24 by 36 mm (the film itself is
    >35mm wide but there's space for sprocket holes).
    >
    >That's 2:3 for the math-challenged.


    Ta.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 23, 2008
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 19:42:36 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >tony cooper wrote:
    >> I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector. I'll
    >> have slides made from .jpgs.
    >>
    >> This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    >> it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    >> best on a slide?

    >
    >3:2
    >
    >> (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    >> the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    >> and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and

    >
    >If you had any friends you could probably ask them to borrow one from work.


    Most of my friends have - as I have - retired. My son has a friend
    who has a graphic arts company, and he has one. That avenue is being
    checked out. In the meantime, I'm planning the presentation based on
    a slide format. It will still work if I do get hold of a MMP.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 23, 2008
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    Keith nuttle Guest

    N wrote:
    > "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector. I'll
    >> have slides made from .jpgs.
    >>
    >> This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    >> it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    >> best on a slide?
    >>
    >> (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    >> the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    >> and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    >> .jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    >> 20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

    >
    >
    > Think about the target screen dimensions and the requirements from the
    > company doing the jpg to slide conversion.
    >

    Do you have access to a digital TV. How big of screen do you need

    Most current DVD players will also play jpg's. As I type this I am
    watching jpg pictures on my TV. Depending on the DVD you can do
    sideshows or one at a time.

    On some of the media edition computers, you can use the S-10 port to
    connect the computer to the TV.

    The first question to answer is the size of the TV. If you have the
    proper size tv your cost would be a few cents for the CD.
     
    Keith nuttle, Nov 23, 2008
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    Ray Fischer Guest

    David J. Littleboy <> wrote:
    >"Ray Fischer" <> wrote:
    >> tony cooper <> wrote:
    >>>I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector.

    >>
    >> The standard image size for slides is 24 by 36 mm (the film itself is
    >> 35mm wide but there's space for sprocket holes).
    >>
    >> That's 2:3 for the math-challenged.

    >
    >It's not that easy. Slides mounts are slightly smaller than 24x36. The first
    >one that came to hand is 23x34.


    Doesn't matter because it doesn't affect the aspect ratio. The slide
    printer is going to print 2:3 regardless of the slide mount.

    --
    Ray Fischer
     
    Ray Fischer, Nov 23, 2008
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 20:37:20 -0500, Keith nuttle
    <> wrote:

    >N wrote:
    >> "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector. I'll
    >>> have slides made from .jpgs.
    >>>
    >>> This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    >>> it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    >>> best on a slide?
    >>>
    >>> (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    >>> the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    >>> and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    >>> .jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    >>> 20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

    >>
    >>
    >> Think about the target screen dimensions and the requirements from the
    >> company doing the jpg to slide conversion.
    >>

    >Do you have access to a digital TV. How big of screen do you need
    >
    >Most current DVD players will also play jpg's. As I type this I am
    >watching jpg pictures on my TV. Depending on the DVD you can do
    >sideshows or one at a time.
    >
    >On some of the media edition computers, you can use the S-10 port to
    >connect the computer to the TV.
    >
    >The first question to answer is the size of the TV. If you have the
    >proper size tv your cost would be a few cents for the CD.



    Thanks for the thought. My daughter connects her laptop to her TV and
    views her images on the TV screen. I'll have to check on how that's
    done, and if a compatible set will be at the location. A laptop will
    be available.

    Never thought of that.

    I've had iffy results in playing DVDs made on my computer on my DVD
    player. I burn home movies to DVD. Some work, and some don't. I can
    make sure I have a working DVD, though.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 23, 2008
    #9
  10. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 21:51:33 -0500, "Larry Thong"
    <> wrote:

    >tony cooper wrote:
    >
    >> (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    >> the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    >> and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    >> .jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    >> 20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)

    >
    >The simple solution is a laptop, MS PowerPoint, and large screen TV. Most
    >TVs have a VGA connector on the input so nothing special is needed


    I don't have that, but I see that I can download a free 60 day trial.

    Look, I really feel bad about responding that I don't have this and
    don't have that, and this won't work for me and that won't work for
    me, but I really am appreciative of the suggestions. And I will check
    them out.

    Technologically, I am middle-of-the-road. I don't own a laptop (but I
    can borrow my daughter's), I don't own any Microsoft software except
    WindowsXP (I use Open Office and Lotus 1-2-3), I don't know where to
    look on my daughter's laptop or a TV to see if a VGA connects, and my
    home TV is a 5 year-old regular set (the presentation will be at a
    place with a large, newish, wall-mounted flat screen).

    I'm a Photoshop junkie and spend a lot of time on that. I do a lot of
    tutorials on Photoshop techniques. The computer stuff I have is
    perfectly adequate for that. I read Photoshop, photography, and
    English usage newsgroups. I'm more interested in word etymology and
    language usage than I am in computer stuff.

    When I sold my business some years ago, we were still doing
    presentations with slide projectors or overheads.





    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 23, 2008
    #10
  11. tony cooper

    N Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 21:51:33 -0500, "Larry Thong"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>tony cooper wrote:
    >>
    >>> (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    >>> the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    >>> and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    >>> .jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    >>> 20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)

    >>
    >>The simple solution is a laptop, MS PowerPoint, and large screen TV. Most
    >>TVs have a VGA connector on the input so nothing special is needed

    >
    > I don't have that, but I see that I can download a free 60 day trial.
    >
    > Look, I really feel bad about responding that I don't have this and
    > don't have that, and this won't work for me and that won't work for
    > me, but I really am appreciative of the suggestions. And I will check
    > them out.
    >
    > Technologically, I am middle-of-the-road. I don't own a laptop (but I
    > can borrow my daughter's), I don't own any Microsoft software except
    > WindowsXP (I use Open Office and Lotus 1-2-3), I don't know where to
    > look on my daughter's laptop or a TV to see if a VGA connects, and my
    > home TV is a 5 year-old regular set (the presentation will be at a
    > place with a large, newish, wall-mounted flat screen).
    >
    > I'm a Photoshop junkie and spend a lot of time on that. I do a lot of
    > tutorials on Photoshop techniques. The computer stuff I have is
    > perfectly adequate for that. I read Photoshop, photography, and
    > English usage newsgroups. I'm more interested in word etymology and
    > language usage than I am in computer stuff.
    >
    > When I sold my business some years ago, we were still doing
    > presentations with slide projectors or overheads.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >



    Irfanview does slide shows. It's free.
    Open Office does presentations.

    A VGA connection shown here on Wiki
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA_connector
     
    N, Nov 23, 2008
    #11
  12. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 14:40:16 +1100, "N" <> wrote:

    >Irfanview does slide shows. It's free.
    >Open Office does presentations.


    I do slide shows frequently. I do them in Photoshop, FastStone, and
    in web applications like JAlbum. My problem is understanding how to
    get the slide show from the computer to the TV screen. I've never
    tried that before.

    Ideally, I'd set up a separate file in FastStone full-screen and
    advance the images in that file manually so they appear on the screen
    for the period I need.

    I'll borrow my daughter's laptop and start playing with it. If her
    laptop and the TV accept the VGA cable, I'll work it out.

    Thanks to all for being patient.



    >A VGA connection shown here on Wiki
    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA_connector


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 23, 2008
    #12
  13. tony cooper

    N Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 14:40:16 +1100, "N" <> wrote:
    >
    >>Irfanview does slide shows. It's free.
    >>Open Office does presentations.

    >
    > I do slide shows frequently. I do them in Photoshop, FastStone, and
    > in web applications like JAlbum. My problem is understanding how to
    > get the slide show from the computer to the TV screen. I've never
    > tried that before.
    >
    > Ideally, I'd set up a separate file in FastStone full-screen and
    > advance the images in that file manually so they appear on the screen
    > for the period I need.
    >
    > I'll borrow my daughter's laptop and start playing with it. If her
    > laptop and the TV accept the VGA cable, I'll work it out.
    >
    > Thanks to all for being patient.
    >
    >
    >
    >>A VGA connection shown here on Wiki
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA_connector

    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida



    It'll depend on the age of the TV as to whether it has VGA input or not.
    However, if it has SVGA or composite, the laptop will probably have either
    or both.
     
    N, Nov 23, 2008
    #13
  14. tony cooper

    Ray Fischer Guest

    tony cooper <> wrote:
    >On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 14:40:16 +1100, "N" <> wrote:
    >
    >>Irfanview does slide shows. It's free.
    >>Open Office does presentations.

    >
    >I do slide shows frequently. I do them in Photoshop, FastStone, and
    >in web applications like JAlbum. My problem is understanding how to
    >get the slide show from the computer to the TV screen. I've never
    >tried that before.


    At some point all the technology will just become one big PITA and
    you'll think that printing slides would have been so much easier.

    --
    Ray Fischer
     
    Ray Fischer, Nov 23, 2008
    #14
  15. tony cooper <> wrote:
    >I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector. I'll
    >have slides made from .jpgs.
    >
    >This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    >it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    >best on a slide?


    Are you talking about the good old film slides on nitrocellulose and
    later on cellulose acetate or polyester that you had to send in for
    development?

    There may have been others but by far the most common format was
    probably 24×36mm which translates into an aspect ratio of 2x3.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Nov 23, 2008
    #15
  16. tony cooper <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 14:40:16 +1100, "N" <> wrote:


    >>Irfanview does slide shows. It's free.
    >>Open Office does presentations.


    > I do slide shows frequently. I do them in Photoshop, FastStone, and
    > in web applications like JAlbum. My problem is understanding how to
    > get the slide show from the computer to the TV screen. I've never
    > tried that before.


    If your camera has an LCD image VGA output and you're prepared to move
    through the slideshow manually you could load the images into the
    camera and use that.

    --
    Chris Malcolm
     
    Chris Malcolm, Nov 23, 2008
    #16
  17. tony cooper

    J. Clarke Guest

    tony cooper wrote:
    > On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 14:40:16 +1100, "N" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Irfanview does slide shows. It's free.
    >> Open Office does presentations.

    >
    > I do slide shows frequently. I do them in Photoshop, FastStone, and
    > in web applications like JAlbum. My problem is understanding how to
    > get the slide show from the computer to the TV screen. I've never
    > tried that before.
    >
    > Ideally, I'd set up a separate file in FastStone full-screen and
    > advance the images in that file manually so they appear on the
    > screen
    > for the period I need.
    >
    > I'll borrow my daughter's laptop and start playing with it. If her
    > laptop and the TV accept the VGA cable, I'll work it out.
    >
    > Thanks to all for being patient.


    You have several options depending on what specifically you have to
    work with.

    If your computer has a composite output then it's easy, you just plug
    from there to the composite input on the TV and you're done. If the
    TV has a VGA input (many newer ones do, but it's not something to
    count on) you _may_ be able to use it--some only work with specific
    scan rates and you may have to do a bit of dinking around to get the
    laptop to output something the TV likes, if you can do it at all--the
    newer video board drivers by trying to be idiot-proof often make such
    things insanely difficult.

    If neither of those is the case, then you have other ways to go. If
    there's a DVD player available then you can burn the slide show onto a
    DVD and play it in the DVD player.

    There are converter boxes that take VGA to composite or S-video or to
    HDMI for under 100 bucks. Don't buy one the night before a big
    presentation though--you may have to fiddle with settings to get it to
    work properly.

    Lastly, a decent projector can be had for under 600 bucks--since it
    also doubles as a HUGE screen TV if you add a tuner box it's not
    really all that bad a price--check the price of the bulbs for the
    things though--the bulb when you need to replace it can be another 500
    bucks on some of them.

    >> A VGA connection shown here on Wiki
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA_connector


    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 23, 2008
    #17
  18. tony cooper

    Don Stauffer Guest

    tony cooper wrote:
    > I'm preparing a presentation using slides and a slide projector. I'll
    > have slides made from .jpgs.
    >
    > This is probably a dumb question, but I just can't get my mind around
    > it. What aspect ratio should I use in cropping the images to display
    > best on a slide?
    >
    > (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    > the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    > and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    > .jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    > 20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)
    >
    >
    >

    Are you going to be using commercial slide mounts? These of course are
    in a 1.5:1 ratio. However, if you make the slides smaller than the 36 x
    24 mm format, then it becomes almost immaterial as long as it is printed
    with a completely dark border. In this case your image itself is
    self-framed.

    However, if you print them LARGER than the 36 x 24 then the slide mount
    will clip your image. So print them 36 x 24 or smaller.
     
    Don Stauffer, Nov 23, 2008
    #18
  19. tony cooper

    JC Dill Guest

    tony cooper wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 21:51:33 -0500, "Larry Thong"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> tony cooper wrote:
    >>
    >>> (Someone's going to ask "Why not use a multi-media projector and skip
    >>> the slides?". The answer is "I don't have a multi-media projector,
    >>> and they rent for $175 a day here. I own a slide projector, and
    >>> .jpg-to-slide cost is $3.00 each. I'll need somewhere between 15 and
    >>> 20 images, so the slide route is cheaper for a one-off project.)

    >> The simple solution is a laptop, MS PowerPoint, and large screen TV. Most
    >> TVs have a VGA connector on the input so nothing special is needed

    >
    > I don't have that, but I see that I can download a free 60 day trial.
    >


    > WindowsXP (I use Open Office and Lotus 1-2-3)


    Open Office has a presentation module similar to PowerPoint.

    However, since you are on Windows I suggest you just use Irfanview
    instead of making a PowerPoint type presentation. See:

    http://www.zisman.ca/Irfanview/

    jc
     
    JC Dill, Nov 24, 2008
    #19
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