Slide feeder performance

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Megapixel, May 16, 2006.

  1. Megapixel

    Megapixel Guest

    I'm interested in purchasing a film scanner for a video transfer
    business. I've narrowed the choices to the Nikon LS-2000 (used),
    LS-5000ED (new) or a Minolta Image Scan Elite-5400. The Nikon's use the
    model SF-210 slide feeder and the Minolta uses the SC-100. Are there any
    significant performance differences between these two slide feeders?
    Have either of them had problems with jamming?
    What film scanner and slide feeder combination would you recommend for a
    moderate to high volume business?

    Thanks
    Megapixel, May 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. Megapixel

    tomm42 Guest

    Megapixel wrote:
    > I'm interested in purchasing a film scanner for a video transfer
    > business. I've narrowed the choices to the Nikon LS-2000 (used),
    > LS-5000ED (new) or a Minolta Image Scan Elite-5400. The Nikon's use the
    > model SF-210 slide feeder and the Minolta uses the SC-100. Are there any
    > significant performance differences between these two slide feeders?
    > Have either of them had problems with jamming?
    > What film scanner and slide feeder combination would you recommend for a
    > moderate to high volume business?
    >
    > Thanks


    The thought of a 50 slide loader has always scared me. Colegues have
    had the Nikon and complained about jamming, especially with cardboard
    mounts, not so much with plastic. The other question is if you scan 50
    slides at a fairly high res, does the scanning program save them for
    you? Or how much ram will you need? A lab/photostore I used to frequent
    had a Sony scanner that did one roll and burn a CD, that made sense to
    me, problem was Sony scanner $5K, CD burning attachment $2K. I think
    that scanner only scans up to 1850ppi too. My only mega scanning jobs
    (other than my own slides, I don't want to talk about that now) has
    been to PowerPoint, I would just photograph the slides off a slide
    duplicator with a Nikon 995 on a copy stand.
    I do like the Minolta 4 slide trays again the small volume makes sense
    but doesn't get the job done very fast.

    Good luck
    Tom
    tomm42, May 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. Megapixel <> writes:

    > I'm interested in purchasing a film scanner for a video transfer
    > business. I've narrowed the choices to the Nikon LS-2000 (used),
    > LS-5000ED (new) or a Minolta Image Scan Elite-5400. The Nikon's use
    > the model SF-210 slide feeder and the Minolta uses the SC-100. Are
    > there any significant performance differences between these two slide
    > feeders? Have either of them had problems with jamming?
    > What film scanner and slide feeder combination would you recommend for
    > a moderate to high volume business?


    The previous Nikon slide feeder had a bad rep, but I never used it.

    I've had very good results with the 5000ED and the SF-210 slide
    feeder. You do have to adjust it for the mount thickness you're
    working with, which means you can't run stacks of mixed mounts through
    it. And if you adjust it wrong, it'll jam a bit. I've never come
    close to damaging a slide, and after the first few days essentially
    never see jams (I guess I learned how to adjust it). It sure is nice
    to run a stack through without having to sit there the whole time,
    waiting for each slide to finish.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 16, 2006
    #3
  4. "tomm42" <> writes:

    > Megapixel wrote:
    > > I'm interested in purchasing a film scanner for a video transfer
    > > business. I've narrowed the choices to the Nikon LS-2000 (used),
    > > LS-5000ED (new) or a Minolta Image Scan Elite-5400. The Nikon's use the
    > > model SF-210 slide feeder and the Minolta uses the SC-100. Are there any
    > > significant performance differences between these two slide feeders?
    > > Have either of them had problems with jamming?
    > > What film scanner and slide feeder combination would you recommend for a
    > > moderate to high volume business?


    > The thought of a 50 slide loader has always scared me. Colegues have
    > had the Nikon and complained about jamming, especially with cardboard
    > mounts, not so much with plastic.


    Do you know if their experiences are with the current SF-210, or the
    previous model?

    > The other question is if you scan 50 slides at a fairly high res,
    > does the scanning program save them for you? Or how much ram will
    > you need?


    It saves them to disk, of course.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 16, 2006
    #4
  5. Megapixel

    Roger Guest

    On 16 May 2006 10:20:57 -0700, "tomm42" <> wrote:

    >
    >Megapixel wrote:
    >> I'm interested in purchasing a film scanner for a video transfer
    >> business. I've narrowed the choices to the Nikon LS-2000 (used),
    >> LS-5000ED (new) or a Minolta Image Scan Elite-5400. The Nikon's use the
    >> model SF-210 slide feeder and the Minolta uses the SC-100. Are there any
    >> significant performance differences between these two slide feeders?
    >> Have either of them had problems with jamming?
    >> What film scanner and slide feeder combination would you recommend for a
    >> moderate to high volume business?
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    >The thought of a 50 slide loader has always scared me. Colegues have
    >had the Nikon and complained about jamming, especially with cardboard
    >mounts, not so much with plastic. The other question is if you scan 50


    After going through over 30,000 slides and negatives I think I have a
    pretty good feel for the LS5000ED and the SF-210.

    Being adjustable for slide thickness makes the SF-210 a pretty nice
    piece of equipment. OTOH much depends on the individual slides.
    Cardboard mounts do not have to be a problem, but if they have been
    heavily used and/or abused they can be a real nuisance. Depending on
    the projectors through which they've been fed and how they've been
    handled the edges may bell out both on the inside and outside. They
    also warm through mishandling and improper storage. When that happens
    they tend to catch on the next slide in the feeder which is not the
    feeders fault.

    *Most times* the slide can be fixed by rubbing, or rolling the edges
    flat and straightening warped mounts. I use the handle of a stainless
    kitchen knife to smooth those edges down. You can also use the back
    of your thumb nail as long as you don't have too many to flatten.
    Otherwise it gets a bit hard on the thumb, but both methods are very
    effective.

    >slides at a fairly high res, does the scanning program save them for
    >you?


    I don't know of any main stream scanning programs that do not save the
    files.

    There are some makes of plastic mounts that may not want to feed at
    all, but "so far" I've found these only need to be turned to the
    proper position. That position may backwards and upside down or any
    other position you can imagine, but software will take care of that.

    >Or how much ram will you need? A lab/photostore I used to frequent


    As to memory, it depends on what you are doing and how many negatives
    or transparencies get scanned in a batch. Each slide from the SF210
    is normally treated separately with both Nikon Scan and VueScan.
    Scanning a strip of negatives or transparencies will normally put all
    of those images into memory. You can also set up many scanning
    programs to run post processing in your favorite image processing
    package. So, you need enough memory for each slide plus work space
    and you need space for the scanning and processing programs.

    I've found that 512 meg will work, but there is a noticeable
    difference in going to one gig. As I run word processing, a spread
    sheet, mail, a browser, and Front page at the same time I'm doing the
    scanning. I have two gig of RAM on this machine.

    If you need more memory it becomes noticeable right away as the system
    will start page file swapping and when it does that it will slow to a
    fraction of its normal speed.

    >had a Sony scanner that did one roll and burn a CD, that made sense to
    >me, problem was Sony scanner $5K, CD burning attachment $2K. I think
    >that scanner only scans up to 1850ppi too. My only mega scanning jobs
    >(other than my own slides, I don't want to talk about that now) has
    >been to PowerPoint, I would just photograph the slides off a slide
    >duplicator with a Nikon 995 on a copy stand.
    >I do like the Minolta 4 slide trays again the small volume makes sense
    >but doesn't get the job done very fast.


    I use Nero and a dual layer CD/DVD burner in each machine. I find I
    can put about the equivalent of one roll on a single layer DVD.
    You can purchase good quality, name brand, CD/DVD burners now for $50
    to $75USD. (Probably cheaper in some places)

    With clean sides and negatives I can scan between one and two per
    minute at 4000 dpi. (any post processing can add greatly to this time)
    IR cleaning if needed and possible will not quite double the scanning
    time. It takes about 4 minutes (give or take) to burn a full DVD and
    about two minutes to set up and print the label *on* the DVD. I use
    "printable" DVDs and CDs so the label is printed right on the back.
    This eliminates the weight of a paper label as well as the
    contamination from the adhesive.

    and as Tom said, Good luck,

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    >
    >Good luck
    >Tom
    Roger, May 16, 2006
    #5
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