Skewed tilt on shoe mount flashes

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by andyj1011@gmail.com, Sep 15, 2006.

  1. Guest

    If this is obvious sorry, but...

    I have noticed folks using the shoe-mount flashes with a skewed tilt.
    Usually, when you point the head up, it is for bounce flash, or when
    you just need a little catch light only, it is nice to angle it up with
    a business card to throw just a wee bit of light....

    But I see people with the flash up at an angle (say 45 or 60 degrees),
    but with the flash head turned slightly (usually to the left) - as if
    you'd want something bounced partially off a ceiling and partially off
    a side wall......but they seem to use the flash in this position even
    outdoors. What's up with that?

    Now that I think about it, I see people using flash with a diffuser
    with the flash head pointed backwards too. What's up there?
    , Sep 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. Pat Guest

    wrote:
    > If this is obvious sorry, but...
    >
    > I have noticed folks using the shoe-mount flashes with a skewed tilt.
    > Usually, when you point the head up, it is for bounce flash, or when
    > you just need a little catch light only, it is nice to angle it up with
    > a business card to throw just a wee bit of light....
    >
    > But I see people with the flash up at an angle (say 45 or 60 degrees),
    > but with the flash head turned slightly (usually to the left) - as if
    > you'd want something bounced partially off a ceiling and partially off
    > a side wall......but they seem to use the flash in this position even
    > outdoors. What's up with that?
    >
    > Now that I think about it, I see people using flash with a diffuser
    > with the flash head pointed backwards too. What's up there?


    You know a lot of strange people.

    When you point it straight up and tape on a "business card" it isn't to
    provide lighting. It is so you see the reflection of the flash in the
    person's eye. It adds a lot to the picture.

    Pointing up outside is unusual. My guess is that they have a really
    big flash and they are trying to bounce it off the moon (or low cloud
    cover).

    Backwards? If inside they might be trying to bounce off a wall behind
    them for diffusion. Also for close-ups and macro, it is sometimes
    necessary because of the distance from the flash to the lense -- so you
    bounce off the ceiling (which requires you to bounce it behind you).

    Otherwise, I think the photographer may have hit the punch bowl one too
    many times.

    (Unless it's a wedding photography and he/she is trying to screw with
    the people crowding in behind him/her)
    Pat, Sep 15, 2006
    #2
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  3. Shaun Guest

    Are you sure he wasn't with an assistant with a reflector?


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If this is obvious sorry, but...
    >
    > I have noticed folks using the shoe-mount flashes with a skewed tilt.
    > Usually, when you point the head up, it is for bounce flash, or when
    > you just need a little catch light only, it is nice to angle it up with
    > a business card to throw just a wee bit of light....
    >
    > But I see people with the flash up at an angle (say 45 or 60 degrees),
    > but with the flash head turned slightly (usually to the left) - as if
    > you'd want something bounced partially off a ceiling and partially off
    > a side wall......but they seem to use the flash in this position even
    > outdoors. What's up with that?
    >
    > Now that I think about it, I see people using flash with a diffuser
    > with the flash head pointed backwards too. What's up there?
    >
    Shaun, Sep 15, 2006
    #3
  4. Roy G Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If this is obvious sorry, but...
    >
    > I have noticed folks using the shoe-mount flashes with a skewed tilt.
    > Usually, when you point the head up, it is for bounce flash, or when
    > you just need a little catch light only, it is nice to angle it up with
    > a business card to throw just a wee bit of light....
    >
    > But I see people with the flash up at an angle (say 45 or 60 degrees),
    > but with the flash head turned slightly (usually to the left) - as if
    > you'd want something bounced partially off a ceiling and partially off
    > a side wall......but they seem to use the flash in this position even
    > outdoors. What's up with that?
    >
    > Now that I think about it, I see people using flash with a diffuser
    > with the flash head pointed backwards too. What's up there?



    Hi

    Are you sure he wasn't trying to spoil it for the rest of the press snappers
    who were standing behind him.

    Roy G
    Roy G, Sep 16, 2006
    #4
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