Silver or Black?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by BRH, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. BRH

    BRH Guest

    Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    black?

    I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    $60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference
    between the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).

    Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    functional difference?
     
    BRH, Jul 17, 2006
    #1
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  2. BRH

    plb49 Guest

    No functional difference--black is traditionally perceived as the "pro"
    color--


    BRH wrote:
    > Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    > black?
    >
    > I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    > $60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference
    > between the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).
    >
    > Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    > functional difference?
     
    plb49, Jul 17, 2006
    #2
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  3. BRH

    sally Guest

    BRH <BRH> wrote in news::
    > Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is
    > silver or black?


    Black looks more nerdy.
     
    sally, Jul 17, 2006
    #3
  4. On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 19:21:26 -0400, BRH <> wrote:
    > Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    > black?
    >
    > I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    > $60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference
    > between the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).
    >
    > Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    > functional difference?


    Personal preference.

    That said, most of the FZs that I've seen in the wild have been black
    (including mine), so maybe Circuit City put the silver body only on
    sale, figuring that people will pay a premium for the black body. List
    prices for the two are the same ($430), so the difference is due to
    Circuit City rather than Panasonic.

    -dms
     
    Daniel Silevitch, Jul 17, 2006
    #4
  5. BRH

    Frank ess Guest

    sally wrote:
    > BRH <BRH> wrote in
    > news::
    >> Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is
    >> silver or black?

    >
    > Black looks more nerdy.


    Unless it's a camera I can slip into a pocket, I prefer silver.
    Received wisdom, and practical experience had to do with black objects
    absorbing more heat-wavelengths.

    On the other hand, I bought a 20D (black) and a RebXT (silver) on the
    basis of what was available; waited for a black Lumix LX1 because it
    might be less obtrusive for candid stuff.

    On yet another hand, when in the field I always drape a
    WhatsernametheEx-con K-Mart dishtowel over the big cameras and never
    leave the little one unprotected, one way and another.

    Essentially, as an earlier responder stated: no practical difference
    .... depending.

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Jul 17, 2006
    #5
  6. <BRH> wrote in message news:...
    > Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    > black?
    >
    > I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    > $60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference between
    > the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).
    >
    > Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    > functional difference?



    They do say though, that once you go black....
     
    Jethro Bodine, Jul 17, 2006
    #6
  7. BRH

    Frank ess Guest

    Jethro Bodine wrote:
    > <BRH> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is
    >> silver or black?
    >>
    >> I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic
    >> FZ7S
    >> for $60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only
    >> difference between the two is that one is silver (S) and the other
    >> is black (K). Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or
    >> is there some
    >> functional difference?

    >
    >
    > They do say though, that once you go black....


    I've forgotten: is it a sixteenth or an eighth"
     
    Frank ess, Jul 17, 2006
    #7
  8. BRH

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 19:21:26 -0400, BRH <BRH> wrote:

    >Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    >black?
    >
    >I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    >$60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference
    >between the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).
    >
    >Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    >functional difference?


    It's a personal preference.
    Some will say, "Pros use black", and choose black on that basis.
    Pros use black because, historically, trhe better cameras were black;
    pros use better cameras, so they used black cameras. They didn't use
    them because they were black, they used them because they were what
    was available to fit their needs.
    Black cameras perform no better than the same cameras in silver. So
    pick the color you want.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Jul 17, 2006
    #8
  9. BRH

    jeremy Guest

    "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 19:21:26 -0400, BRH <BRH> wrote:
    >
    >>Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    >>black?
    >>
    >>I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    >>$60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference
    >>between the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).
    >>
    >>Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    >>functional difference?

    >
    > It's a personal preference.
    > Some will say, "Pros use black", and choose black on that basis.
    > Pros use black because, historically, trhe better cameras were black;
    > pros use better cameras, so they used black cameras. They didn't use
    > them because they were black, they used them because they were what
    > was available to fit their needs.
    > Black cameras perform no better than the same cameras in silver. So
    > pick the color you want.
    > --
    > Bill Funk
    > replace "g" with "a"


    I heard some silliness about 30 years ago that pros used black to minimize
    the camera reflecting unwanted light upon the subject. This was back when
    cameras in satin chrome finish were made of metal, not solver-colored
    plastic.
     
    jeremy, Jul 17, 2006
    #9
  10. BRH

    Prometheus Guest

    In article <W%Pug.8277$A8.872@trnddc02>, jeremy <>
    writes
    >
    >"Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 19:21:26 -0400, BRH <BRH> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    >>>black?
    >>>
    >>>I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    >>>$60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference
    >>>between the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).
    >>>
    >>>Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    >>>functional difference?

    >>
    >> It's a personal preference.
    >> Some will say, "Pros use black", and choose black on that basis.
    >> Pros use black because, historically, trhe better cameras were black;
    >> pros use better cameras, so they used black cameras. They didn't use
    >> them because they were black, they used them because they were what
    >> was available to fit their needs.
    >> Black cameras perform no better than the same cameras in silver. So
    >> pick the color you want.

    >
    >I heard some silliness about 30 years ago that pros used black to minimize
    >the camera reflecting unwanted light upon the subject. This was back when
    >cameras in satin chrome finish were made of metal, not solver-colored
    >plastic.


    The one I heard was to reduce reflection problems when photographing
    through glass, I am not sure what this means for the photographers face
    and white shirt. Another one I heard is to avoid desensitizing your eye
    when you raise a shinny camera to it, I am not sure about the eye's
    recovery time. They do both make some sense, and reducing potential
    problems is not a bad idea. The main problem with black is heating in
    sun light, I was keeping my camera shaded as I walked around today,
    although it might have been unnecessary (I shall check the spec.). You
    might ask yourself why long lenses are often white.

    --
    Ian G8ILZ
     
    Prometheus, Jul 17, 2006
    #10
  11. BRH

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 17:44:22 GMT, "jeremy" <> wrote:

    >I heard some silliness about 30 years ago that pros used black to minimize
    >the camera reflecting unwanted light upon the subject. This was back when
    >cameras in satin chrome finish were made of metal, not solver-colored
    >plastic.
    >

    Yeah, I would classify that as silliness. :)
    Satin chrome isn't that much of a reflector at any distance more than,
    say, a foot.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Jul 17, 2006
    #11
  12. BRH

    JohnR66 Guest

    <BRH> wrote in message news:...
    > Does it make any difference whether a digital camera's body is silver or
    > black?
    >
    > I ask because the Circuit City website is selling the Panasonic FZ7S for
    > $60 less than the FZ7K. As far as I can tell, the only difference between
    > the two is that one is silver (S) and the other is black (K).
    >
    > Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    > functional difference?


    Silver does not get so hot when using the camera out in the sun. When
    shooting at an airshow on a sunny 90 deg day, I was concerned about the heat
    buildup in the camera. It got very hot.
    John
     
    JohnR66, Jul 17, 2006
    #12
  13. BRH

    ASAAR Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 19:26:41 +0100, Prometheus wrote:

    > You might ask yourself why long lenses are often white.


    Because white wouldn't go out of fashion nearly as fast as tail
    fins would.
     
    ASAAR, Jul 18, 2006
    #13
  14. BRH

    ASAAR Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 15:47:23 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:

    > Yeah, I would classify that as silliness. :)
    > Satin chrome isn't that much of a reflector at any distance more than,
    > say, a foot.


    I think it's less about reflecting light (glare) than about
    allowing for pro photographers using every trick possible to remain
    inconspicuous. In this case, black might not help too much during
    daylight hours. But during dusk, a dark camera might be much harder
    to notice by skittish subjects. I'm sure that some amateurs also
    chose to pay more for black bodies for no other reason than that was
    supposedly the hallmark of a pro. My Nikon bodies were always satin
    chrome, but I did prefer the look of the black bodies.
     
    ASAAR, Jul 18, 2006
    #14
  15. In article <>, BRH wrote:

    > Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    > functional difference?


    Back when I started in photography, 40 years ago, it was "general
    knowledge" that black bodies were preferred by pros (primarily
    photojournalists) because they were less conspicuous. They were more
    expensive because of lower production, despite the fact that black
    paint was cheaper and less durable than chrome plating.

    I think all that is wrong now. Most bodies are painted silver, which
    shows marks more quickly than bare black plastic. We're so accustomed
    to people holding shiny things near their faces that black is probably
    MORE conspicuous.

    The reflect/absorb heat thing has some limited merit, but depends on
    your climate - absorbing heat may be a GOOD thing. (This is, however,
    why many long lenses are painted white. Thermal expansion may affect
    their performance).

    So now, it comes down to taste and style. Me, I buy whatever I think
    will look better after a few decades of use. (Not that any modern
    camera will actually last that long - holding in mind my 1954 Leica
    IIIg still looks and works great.)
     
    Scott Schuckert, Jul 18, 2006
    #15
  16. BRH

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (Scott Schuckert) wrote in
    news:180720060953497251%:

    > In article <>, BRH
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there
    >> some functional difference?

    >
    > Back when I started in photography, 40 years ago, it was "general
    > knowledge" that black bodies were preferred by pros (primarily
    > photojournalists) because they were less conspicuous.


    When in fact, black bodies were so uncommon that they stuck out like
    sore thumbs.

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Jul 18, 2006
    #16
  17. BRH

    jeremy Guest

    "Bert Hyman" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns98045AF0911BFVeebleFetzer@127.0.0.1...
    >
    > When in fact, black bodies were so uncommon that they stuck out like
    > sore thumbs.
    >



    My first recollection of a black body being marketed as somehow superior was
    when Honeywell began importing the Pentax ES, circa 1973. Prior to that,
    virtually all Pentax cameras were furnished in Satin Chrome, with black
    being available at about $10.00 more. Honeywell didn't push black, and
    almost all of the Pentax 35mm cameras were bought in the chrome finish. But
    when the ES made its debut, just the opposite occurred. All the brochures
    and magazine ads displayed the black version ("Satin Black") and there were
    virtually no chrome units sold.

    Today a chrome ES or ES-II is considered a rarity and is offered for sale at
    a substantially higher price on eBay or KEH.

    When Pentax introduced their first K-mount cameras, in 1975, they reverted
    back to chrome. The K2, KX and K-1000 were all marketed in chrome versions.

    I vaguely recall Zeiss lenses being made in chrome versions back in the late
    50s. When lenses shifted to black barrels, manufacturers touted it as
    looking more professional. Now Zeiss is returning to chrome lenses with the
    introduction of the Zeiss Ikon system, in addition to the standard black
    versions.

    There was a parallel in the audio field. Early on, stereo
    receivers/tuners/amps had brushed chrome faceplates. They later went to all
    black by the late 60s.

    I suspect that this is all just a fashion statement on the part of the
    manufacturers. Somewhat analogous to hemlines.
     
    jeremy, Jul 18, 2006
    #17
  18. BRH

    m II Guest

    ASAAR wrote:
    > On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 19:26:41 +0100, Prometheus wrote:
    >
    >> You might ask yourself why long lenses are often white.

    >
    > Because white wouldn't go out of fashion nearly as fast as tail
    > fins would.
    >


    It seems like only yesterday...

    http://www.carofthecentury.com/tail_fins_rising.htm




    mike
     
    m II, Jul 21, 2006
    #18
  19. BRH

    J. Clarke Guest

    Scott Schuckert wrote:

    > In article <>, BRH wrote:
    >
    >> Is the choice of color just a personal preference, or is there some
    >> functional difference?

    >
    > Back when I started in photography, 40 years ago, it was "general
    > knowledge" that black bodies were preferred by pros (primarily
    > photojournalists) because they were less conspicuous. They were more
    > expensive because of lower production, despite the fact that black
    > paint was cheaper and less durable than chrome plating.


    I remember when Leica came out with an all-black body and made a big deal
    about black chrome instead of paint.

    > I think all that is wrong now. Most bodies are painted silver, which
    > shows marks more quickly than bare black plastic. We're so accustomed
    > to people holding shiny things near their faces that black is probably
    > MORE conspicuous.
    >
    > The reflect/absorb heat thing has some limited merit, but depends on
    > your climate - absorbing heat may be a GOOD thing. (This is, however,
    > why many long lenses are painted white. Thermal expansion may affect
    > their performance).
    >
    > So now, it comes down to taste and style. Me, I buy whatever I think
    > will look better after a few decades of use. (Not that any modern
    > camera will actually last that long - holding in mind my 1954 Leica
    > IIIg still looks and works great.)


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Jul 27, 2006
    #19
  20. In article <>, J. Clarke
    <> wrote:

    > I remember when Leica came out with an all-black body and made a big deal
    > about black chrome instead of paint.


    Yup. And I still have in my collection (get this!) a Kodak Pocket
    Instamatic 60 Special Edition in black chrome.

    I'm not sure I ever read up on exactly what "black chrome" was from a
    metalurgical viewpoint; but it seemed to scratch more easily than the
    shiny version. Didn't chip like paint, though.
     
    Scott Schuckert, Jul 27, 2006
    #20
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