signal or network booster

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by Hana, Mar 22, 2007.

  1. Hana

    Hana Guest

    Hi all,

    Slightly off topic but still relevant to this group I hope.

    After my existing router and modem set up failed, I took the
    opportunity of making the change to a FritzBox 7140 and I have to say
    it was the easiest thing in the world to set up, I had it up and
    running in minutes, fantastic. ( You are right Ivor, it is incredibly
    user friendly).

    I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    beyond my limited networking capabilities.

    My question today, is there an easy way of boosting network signal to
    an upstairs floor? One that specifically will work with the FritzBox
    7140, is there such a thing that I can just plug in and it will work ?

    Thanks for any ideas,

    Hana
    Hana, Mar 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. Hana

    Herman Guest

    "Hana" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > Slightly off topic but still relevant to this group I hope.
    >
    > After my existing router and modem set up failed, I took the
    > opportunity of making the change to a FritzBox 7140 and I have to say
    > it was the easiest thing in the world to set up, I had it up and
    > running in minutes, fantastic. ( You are right Ivor, it is incredibly
    > user friendly).
    >
    > I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    > bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    > frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    > beyond my limited networking capabilities.
    >
    > My question today, is there an easy way of boosting network signal to
    > an upstairs floor? One that specifically will work with the FritzBox
    > 7140, is there such a thing that I can just plug in and it will work ?
    >
    > Thanks for any ideas,
    >
    > Hana
    >

    I have wireless bridging working with 7050 and a Belkin WLAN router
    configured as a switch. Not quite sure how it is configured as I did it a
    few months ago, but I can say it does take a couple of attempts, especially
    if you are using MAC security. One thing I can remember was that I ended up
    using WEP encription, as there appeared to be issues when I configured it as
    WPA.

    My advice is to persevere with what you've got to see if you can get it to
    work.
    Herman, Mar 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. Hana

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    Hana wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > Slightly off topic but still relevant to this group I hope.
    >
    > After my existing router and modem set up failed, I took the
    > opportunity of making the change to a FritzBox 7140 and I have to say
    > it was the easiest thing in the world to set up, I had it up and
    > running in minutes, fantastic. ( You are right Ivor, it is incredibly
    > user friendly).
    >
    > I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    > bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    > frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    > beyond my limited networking capabilities.
    >
    > My question today, is there an easy way of boosting network signal to
    > an upstairs floor?


    Yes a wireless acces point - Trying to use a wireless router is possible
    but unless you know exactly what is required to stop the router routing,
    then you will have problems.

    An alternative is ethernet over the mains.

    For an AP try a Zyxel Zyair B-1000. If you think you might need more to
    repeat etc, try a Zyair G570S

    For ethernet over the mains try a Zyxel PL-100 kit.
    Desk Rabbit, Mar 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Hana

    Niko;) Guest

    Hana wrote:
    [...]
    >
    > My question today, is there an easy way of boosting network signal to
    > an upstairs floor? One that specifically will work with the FritzBox
    > 7140, is there such a thing that I can just plug in and it will work ?
    >
    > Thanks for any ideas,
    >
    > Hana
    >


    I think that the cheapest and simples solution is to use an external
    aerial (2.4GHz, 8db or more...) to boost your signal.
    Regards,
    Niko;)
    Niko;), Mar 22, 2007
    #4
  5. Hana

    Brian A Guest

    On 22 Mar 2007 00:32:47 -0700, "Hana" <> wrote:


    >
    >I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    >bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    >frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    >beyond my limited networking capabilities.

    I don't know if I can offer anything useful but...
    I have been looking at Buffalo stuff recently. You don't say what
    model it is. Is it one that can act as a wireless access point as
    well as be a router?
    'Desk Rabbit' did suggest a wireless access point - which you may
    already have. If you are not happy with your Buffalo as it is I do
    believe that there is a reflash option with independent software from
    here
    http://www.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv2/downloads.php
    I have not tried any of this but have seen postings about it.
    I don't know if it will help you.
    I did read somewhere that the Bufallo stuff was difficult to set up
    with non-Bufallo products so it might not just be you who experiences
    problems.

    Remove 'no_spam_' from email address.
    Brian A, Mar 22, 2007
    #5
  6. Hana

    Hana Guest


    > >I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    > >bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    > >frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    > >beyond my limited networking capabilities.

    >
    > I don't know if I can offer anything useful but...
    > I have been looking at Buffalo stuff recently. You don't say what
    > model it is. Is it one that can act as a wireless access point as
    > well as be a router?


    Hi Brian,
    It is the type that can be used as a wireless access point, ( WHR-HP-
    G54 High power turbo ) I'm going to try again with it today , I've got
    instructions from Buffalo ( although they do say it is difficult and
    they won't support bridging to a different router brand ) and
    instructions from a networking website but I seem to get lost along
    the way, it's all very complicated at the moment.

    Thanks again,

    Hana
    Hana, Mar 22, 2007
    #6
  7. Hana

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    Hana wrote:
    >>> I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    >>> bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    >>> frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    >>> beyond my limited networking capabilities.

    >> I don't know if I can offer anything useful but...
    >> I have been looking at Buffalo stuff recently. You don't say what
    >> model it is. Is it one that can act as a wireless access point as
    >> well as be a router?

    >
    > Hi Brian,
    > It is the type that can be used as a wireless access point, ( WHR-HP-
    > G54 High power turbo ) I'm going to try again with it today , I've got
    > instructions from Buffalo ( although they do say it is difficult and
    > they won't support bridging to a different router brand ) and
    > instructions from a networking website but I seem to get lost along
    > the way, it's all very complicated at the moment.
    >
    > Thanks again,
    >
    > Hana
    >

    Wireless repeating using different brands is damn near impossible (Even
    sometimes within the same brands it can't be done due to different
    chipsets). Trying to use a wireless router as an AP/repeater just makes
    it even harder.
    Desk Rabbit, Mar 22, 2007
    #7
  8. Hana

    Herman Guest

    "Desk Rabbit" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hana wrote:
    >>>> I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    >>>> bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    >>>> frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    >>>> beyond my limited networking capabilities.
    >>> I don't know if I can offer anything useful but...
    >>> I have been looking at Buffalo stuff recently. You don't say what
    >>> model it is. Is it one that can act as a wireless access point as
    >>> well as be a router?

    >>
    >> Hi Brian,
    >> It is the type that can be used as a wireless access point, ( WHR-HP-
    >> G54 High power turbo ) I'm going to try again with it today , I've got
    >> instructions from Buffalo ( although they do say it is difficult and
    >> they won't support bridging to a different router brand ) and
    >> instructions from a networking website but I seem to get lost along
    >> the way, it's all very complicated at the moment.
    >>
    >> Thanks again,
    >>
    >> Hana
    >>

    > Wireless repeating using different brands is damn near impossible (Even
    > sometimes within the same brands it can't be done due to different
    > chipsets). Trying to use a wireless router as an AP/repeater just makes it
    > even harder.


    Seems to work OK for me (AVM/Belkin) although it was a bit difficult.
    Herman, Mar 22, 2007
    #8
  9. Hana

    alexd Guest

    Hana wrote:

    > I then tried to set up my old router ( Buffalo High Power) to create a
    > bridge to boost the signal upstairs but after 2 unbelievably
    > frustrating evenings and many wasted hours, I realise that it is
    > beyond my limited networking capabilities.


    How are you attempting to bridge the two? Cat5 or wireless? If it's
    wireless, then best of luck. Unless the hardware is specifically designed
    to be a repeater [two sets of radio gear, two antennae], the performance
    will be poor.

    > My question today, is there an easy way of boosting network signal to
    > an upstairs floor?


    - Run Cat5 between the LAN ports of each
    - Put them on the same subnet
    - Make sure you only have a DHCP server running on one of them, or make them
    compatible
    - Make the ESSIDs and the WEP keys the same
    - Put them on non-overlapping WLAN channels [eg 1 and 13]
    - For best results, lower your expectations, as wireless often sucks ;-)

    --
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    alexd, Mar 22, 2007
    #9
  10. Hana

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    alexd wrote:

    > How are you attempting to bridge the two? Cat5 or wireless? If it's
    > wireless, then best of luck. Unless the hardware is specifically designed
    > to be a repeater [two sets of radio gear, two antennae]


    "two sets of radio gear, two antennae" Eh????
    Desk Rabbit, Mar 23, 2007
    #10
  11. Hana

    alexd Guest

    Desk Rabbit wrote:

    > alexd wrote:
    >
    >> How are you attempting to bridge the two? Cat5 or wireless? If it's
    >> wireless, then best of luck. Unless the hardware is specifically designed
    >> to be a repeater [two sets of radio gear, two antennae]

    >
    > "two sets of radio gear, two antennae" Eh????


    A repeater would have to listen on one channel and retransmit what it heard
    on another. Hence needing two sets of RF gear, and most likely two
    antennae; one directional antenna pointing at the signal that it's trying
    to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna repeating the signal to the
    intended clients would be ideal.

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) ()
    16:11:16 up 28 days, 20:24, 2 users, load average: 0.00, 0.07, 0.18
    This is my BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOMSTICK
    alexd, Mar 23, 2007
    #11
  12. Hana

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    alexd wrote:
    > Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >
    >> alexd wrote:
    >>
    >>> How are you attempting to bridge the two? Cat5 or wireless? If it's
    >>> wireless, then best of luck. Unless the hardware is specifically designed
    >>> to be a repeater [two sets of radio gear, two antennae]

    >> "two sets of radio gear, two antennae" Eh????

    >
    > A repeater would have to listen on one channel and retransmit what it heard
    > on another. Hence needing two sets of RF gear, and most likely two
    > antennae; one directional antenna pointing at the signal that it's trying
    > to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna repeating the signal to the
    > intended clients would be ideal.
    >


    And such a thing can be found where exactly?

    You are just guessing aren't you?
    Desk Rabbit, Mar 26, 2007
    #12
  13. Hana

    alexd Guest

    Desk Rabbit wrote:

    > alexd wrote:


    >> A repeater would have to listen on one channel and retransmit what it
    >> heard on another. Hence needing two sets of RF gear, and most likely two
    >> antennae; one directional antenna pointing at the signal that it's trying
    >> to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna repeating the signal to the
    >> intended clients would be ideal.
    >>

    >
    > And such a thing can be found where exactly?


    No idea. You could build one from [say] a router running OpenWRT. Or you
    could buy one.

    > You are just guessing aren't you?


    Eh?

    --
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    alexd, Mar 26, 2007
    #13
  14. Hana

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    alexd wrote:
    > Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >
    >> alexd wrote:

    >
    >>> A repeater would have to listen on one channel and retransmit what it
    >>> heard on another. Hence needing two sets of RF gear, and most likely two
    >>> antennae; one directional antenna pointing at the signal that it's trying
    >>> to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna repeating the signal to the
    >>> intended clients would be ideal.
    >>>

    >> And such a thing can be found where exactly?

    >
    > No idea. You could build one from [say] a router running OpenWRT. Or you
    > could buy one.


    Like I said, you are just guessing...........
    Desk Rabbit, Mar 26, 2007
    #14
  15. Hana

    alexd Guest

    Desk Rabbit wrote:

    > Like I said, you are just guessing...........


    Whatever.

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) ()
    20:33:18 up 31 days, 23:46, 2 users, load average: 0.16, 0.47, 0.28
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    alexd, Mar 26, 2007
    #15
  16. Hana

    ale.cx Guest

    On 26 Mar, 14:18, Desk Rabbit <> wrote:
    > alexd wrote:
    > > Desk Rabbit wrote:

    >
    > >> alexd wrote:

    >
    > >>> How are you attempting to bridge the two? Cat5 or wireless? If it's
    > >>> wireless, then best of luck. Unless the hardware is specifically designed
    > >>> to be a repeater [two sets of radio gear, two antennae]
    > >> "two sets of radio gear, two antennae" Eh????

    >
    > > A repeater would have to listen on one channel and retransmit what it heard
    > > on another. Hence needing two sets of RF gear, and most likely two
    > > antennae; one directional antenna pointing at the signal that it's trying
    > > to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna repeating the signal to the
    > > intended clients would be ideal.

    >
    > And such a thing can be found where exactly?
    >
    > You are just guessing aren't you?


    Netgear WAG302, for example

    http://www.wizardprice.com/products/WAG302EU.NE

    Sorry it took so long.

    alexd
    ale.cx, Apr 30, 2007
    #16
  17. Hana

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    ale.cx wrote:
    > On 26 Mar, 14:18, Desk Rabbit <> wrote:
    >> alexd wrote:
    >>> Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >>>> alexd wrote:
    >>>>> How are you attempting to bridge the two? Cat5 or wireless? If it's
    >>>>> wireless, then best of luck. Unless the hardware is specifically designed
    >>>>> to be a repeater [two sets of radio gear, two antennae]
    >>>> "two sets of radio gear, two antennae" Eh????
    >>> A repeater would have to listen on one channel and retransmit what it heard
    >>> on another. Hence needing two sets of RF gear, and most likely two
    >>> antennae; one directional antenna pointing at the signal that it's trying
    >>> to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna repeating the signal to the
    >>> intended clients would be ideal.

    >> And such a thing can be found where exactly?
    >>
    >> You are just guessing aren't you?

    >
    > Netgear WAG302, for example
    >
    > http://www.wizardprice.com/products/WAG302EU.NE
    >
    > Sorry it took so long.
    >
    > alexd
    >


    Sorry, wrong again. You said "one directional antenna pointing at the
    signal that it's trying to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna
    repeating the signal to the intended clients would be ideal."

    Here are some different antenna
    http://www.wifigear.co.uk/wifi-antennas-c-32.html

    Note the difference between a directional Yagi and an omni-directional.
    Now look at the picture of the WAG302 and you will hopefully see that it
    has two omni directional aerials. Granted it might have two transcievers
    but I still see no evidence that it is working the way you suggest it
    should work, only that it has more than one omni-directional aerial for
    better coverage.
    Desk Rabbit, May 1, 2007
    #17
  18. Hana

    alexd Guest

    Desk Muppet wrote:

    > Sorry, wrong again. You said "one directional antenna pointing at the
    > signal that it's trying to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna
    > repeating the signal to the intended clients would be ideal."


    If you *have* to buy them with directional antennas, look at this:

    http://www.wifigear.co.uk/dualband-bridging-budget-p-367.html

    > Here are some different antenna
    > http://www.wifigear.co.uk/wifi-antennas-c-32.html
    >
    > Note the difference between a directional Yagi and an omni-directional.
    > Now look at the picture of the WAG302 and you will hopefully see that it
    > has two omni directional aerials.


    Thanks for the help there, Captain Obvious.

    > Granted it might have two transcievers but I still see no evidence that
    > it is working the way you suggest it should work, only that it has more
    > than one omni-directional aerial for better coverage.


    It definitely does have two transceivers; the 11A is connected to one
    socket, and the 11G is connected to t'other.

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) ()
    18:09:27 up 2 days, 20:08, 2 users, load average: 0.08, 0.28, 0.52
    Yes. I'm just guessing.
    alexd, May 1, 2007
    #18
  19. Hana

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    alexd wrote:
    > Desk Muppet wrote:
    >
    >> Sorry, wrong again. You said "one directional antenna pointing at the
    >> signal that it's trying to boost, and one omnidirectional antenna
    >> repeating the signal to the intended clients would be ideal."

    >
    > If you *have* to buy them with directional antennas, look at this:


    That does indeed look the part but still not exactly what you and the OP
    were talking about which was to boost the signal to other clients.

    >
    > http://www.wifigear.co.uk/dualband-bridging-budget-p-367.html
    >
    >> Here are some different antenna
    >> http://www.wifigear.co.uk/wifi-antennas-c-32.html
    >>
    >> Note the difference between a directional Yagi and an omni-directional.
    >> Now look at the picture of the WAG302 and you will hopefully see that it
    >> has two omni directional aerials.

    >
    > Thanks for the help there, Captain Obvious.

    Well its not obvious from your posts that you know much about antennas
    and radio and no offence was intended.

    >
    >> Granted it might have two transcievers but I still see no evidence that
    >> it is working the way you suggest it should work, only that it has more
    >> than one omni-directional aerial for better coverage.

    >
    > It definitely does have two transceivers; the 11A is connected to one
    > socket, and the 11G is connected to t'other.
    >

    Oh I see, so if you are unlucky enough to want to use say 11G and that
    is being used for the bridge, then you are stuffed - useful piece of kit ;-)
    Desk Rabbit, May 2, 2007
    #19
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