[SI] My Pinhole pictures

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Robert Coe, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. Robert Coe

    Robert Coe Guest

    I thought I'd provide a bit of context for my Shoot-In submissions this month.

    My ongoing assignment to photograph points of interest in the city for which I
    work (Cambridge, Massachusetts) leaves me little time for photography that
    isn't work-related. However, the assignment itself, which takes me to dozens
    of locations I've never seen before, is the virtual equivalent of a collection
    of pinholes in a map of Cambridge. So I've submitted three of the pictures
    I've taken so far, hoping that this fulfills the spirit, if not exactly the
    letter, of the mandate.

    Pinhole Bob_Coe 1: This is Cambridge's Old Burial Ground, which we think is
    more authentic than its equivalents in Boston, because its graves have been
    disturbed less over time. In the U.S., at least, humor isn't something you
    necessarily expect on early 19th-century gravestones, but look closely at the
    middle stone. Its tympanum features a traditional "urn & willow" motif, but
    here the urn is a grinning face with the willow as its hair. The grave's
    occupant, William Kneeland, was once a tutor at Harvard College, a job he
    apparently lost to anti-nepotism rules when he married Elizabeth Holyoke, the
    daughter of the college's president. Her stone is to the viewer's right; the
    stone on the left is that of their daughter, also named Elizabeth. Note that
    the main inscription on Mr Kneeland's stone is in Latin; college tutors were
    presumably expected to be Latin scholars.

    Pinhole Bob_Coe 2: Cambridge's skylines, and several of its most interesting
    buildings, are best seen from the Charles River; and so far I've walked the
    footpaths on one or both sides of the river from Lechmere Square to the Eliot
    Bridge. This is Harvard University's Weld Boathouse. It sits beside the Larz
    Anderson Bridge (a name questioned by Wikipedia but used by all), which
    connects Harvard's main campus in Cambridge with its Business School and
    athletic complex in Brighton. I like the picture because I think it expresses
    the traditional seedy elegance of an Ivy League university (I attended one
    myself) pretty well. I'm tempted to call the scene European (French or Belgian
    perhaps?), although my one brief visit to Europe hardly provides enough
    support for that leap.

    Pinhole Bob_Coe 3: Farther upriver, near the Eliot Bridge, is Mount Auburn
    Hospital. The real reason I include this picture is that fourteen years ago
    the doctors and nurses at Mount Auburn saved my life. The building fronts on
    Mount Auburn Street, a major thoroughfare, but is best seen from the river.
    (Another major thoroughfare, Memorial Drive, separates the building from the
    river, but you might not notice it from this angle except at rush hour.) The
    reverse is also true: for several days of my stay I had a room overlooking the
    river, and the view was spectacular, especially at night.

    As you might imagine, these pictures are the tip of a growing iceberg, and it
    may well be that others will appear in future Shoot-Ins. Indeed, I've already
    set aside one or two to use for mandates that I plan to propose. ;^)

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Jul 21, 2010
    #1
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  2. Robert Coe

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 19:04:01 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >I thought I'd provide a bit of context for my Shoot-In submissions this month.
    >

    I'm snipping here, but that's because I'm tired to having to scroll
    through long posts to get to replies.

    I love it when photographs tell a story or have a story behind them.
    Ideally, the photograph itself should contain all or part of the
    story, but sometimes that's not possible. Short of a balloon and
    arrow to "Bob's room" at the hospital, it just can't be done
    sometimes.

    I enjoyed the gravestone stories. My one complaint about that image
    was that I couldn't find a hint of the story in what was shown, but I
    knew one was there.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jul 21, 2010
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  3. Robert Coe

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 20:09:20 -0400, tony cooper <>
    wrote:
    : I enjoyed the gravestone stories. My one complaint about that image
    : was that I couldn't find a hint of the story in what was shown, but I
    : knew one was there.

    Yeah, I had to use Google to fill in the blanks. Then I had to try to figure
    out which of the blatantly contradictory assertions I found were right and
    which were wrong.

    More on this yarn: I of course realized that the stones were hard to read, so
    I went back a few days ago and tried to remedy that by photographing them
    again face-on. But the light was too flat, and the new pictures came out
    generally worse than the original. But in culling those pictures this morning,
    I discovered that the "urn & willow" motif on Kneeland's *wife's* stone (which
    I knew about) also represents a face, which I didn't know. The representation
    is radically different from the one on Kneeland's stone, but I don't think
    there's any doubt that it's there. Another visit is obviously required.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Jul 21, 2010
    #3
  4. Robert Coe

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 21:12:00 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 20:09:20 -0400, tony cooper <>
    >wrote:
    >: I enjoyed the gravestone stories. My one complaint about that image
    >: was that I couldn't find a hint of the story in what was shown, but I
    >: knew one was there.
    >
    >Yeah, I had to use Google to fill in the blanks. Then I had to try to figure
    >out which of the blatantly contradictory assertions I found were right and
    >which were wrong.
    >
    >More on this yarn: I of course realized that the stones were hard to read, so
    >I went back a few days ago and tried to remedy that by photographing them
    >again face-on. But the light was too flat, and the new pictures came out
    >generally worse than the original. But in culling those pictures this morning,
    >I discovered that the "urn & willow" motif on Kneeland's *wife's* stone (which
    >I knew about) also represents a face, which I didn't know. The representation
    >is radically different from the one on Kneeland's stone, but I don't think
    >there's any doubt that it's there. Another visit is obviously required.


    I know I get hung up on things like this. If there's history, I want
    to know it.

    In another post, SavageDuck linked to a photo of an old motorcycle.
    Evidently a racing bike with that number badge on the front fender. I
    want to know what make and when it was made.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jul 21, 2010
    #4
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