Should Outside Cats Use A Collar

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by 88059355, Jan 10, 2008.

  1. 88059355

    88059355 Guest

    Most cat owners find themselves in a quandary over whether or not to
    use a cat collar on their outdoor cats. The debate still reigns over
    the pros and cons of outfitting an outside cat with a collar, but many
    veterinarians and cat experts agree that collars are the best way to
    go. However, before you decide, take a look at these pros and cons:

    Pros:

    ? Cat collars can hold identification and registration tags. This is
    critical in case your outdoor cat becomes lost or is picked up by a
    concerned individual. Also, collars can hold bells or other noise
    generating items to scare away potential prey.

    ? Many cat collars are equipped with reflective material. Whether the
    collar is made completely out of reflective material or only contains
    a small strip, this will help your cat to become more visible in the
    dark. Cats, especially those of dark color, can become invisible at
    night, which is a potentially dangerous situation.

    Cons:

    ? Cat collars can easily snag and cause your cat to become hung or
    stuck on branches, fences, or anything else in the great outdoors.
    Some cats have actually been strangled when their collar has gotten
    caught and cut off the animal's air supply.

    ? Your cat may not be comfortable wearing a collar or the collar may
    be too heavy for the animal.

    Given these pros and cons, consider choosing a collar that will
    maximize the positives and minimize the negatives. For example, there
    are many collars on the market that are specially designed to break
    away or unclasp when the cat is hung. These collars are considered
    strangle-proof and release when approximately seven pounds of pressure
    is applied. This way, the cat can break him--or her--self free from any
    snare.

    Furthermore, there are many different types of collars on the market.
    Bring your feline friend with you to the local pet-friendly pet store
    and try on several different types of collars until you find one that
    best fits. Avoid choosing a harness for outdoor cats unless you plan
    on walking the cat on a leash. If this is the case, only allow your
    cat to wear a harness while supervised, as most are not snare-proof.

    On a whole, collars are encouraged on cats that spend their time
    outside and inside. In addition to providing visibility to your
    animal, the collar will hold valuable identification information that
    will protect your cat and assist you in finding your pet.
    http://cncarrental.cn/html/business/20061001/40280.html
    88059355, Jan 10, 2008
    #1
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  2. 88059355

    Barry OGrady Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 00:14:18 -0800 (PST), 88059355 <> wrote:

    >Most cat owners find themselves in a quandary over whether or not to
    >use a cat collar on their outdoor cats. The debate still reigns over
    >the pros and cons of outfitting an outside cat with a collar, but many
    >veterinarians and cat experts agree that collars are the best way to
    >go. However, before you decide, take a look at these pros and cons:


    Are we talking fibre, coax, UTP, or wireless?



    >
    >Pros:
    >
    >? Cat collars can hold identification and registration tags. This is
    >critical in case your outdoor cat becomes lost or is picked up by a
    >concerned individual. Also, collars can hold bells or other noise
    >generating items to scare away potential prey.
    >
    >? Many cat collars are equipped with reflective material. Whether the
    >collar is made completely out of reflective material or only contains
    >a small strip, this will help your cat to become more visible in the
    >dark. Cats, especially those of dark color, can become invisible at
    >night, which is a potentially dangerous situation.
    >
    >Cons:
    >
    >? Cat collars can easily snag and cause your cat to become hung or
    >stuck on branches, fences, or anything else in the great outdoors.
    >Some cats have actually been strangled when their collar has gotten
    >caught and cut off the animal's air supply.
    >
    >? Your cat may not be comfortable wearing a collar or the collar may
    >be too heavy for the animal.
    >
    >Given these pros and cons, consider choosing a collar that will
    >maximize the positives and minimize the negatives. For example, there
    >are many collars on the market that are specially designed to break
    >away or unclasp when the cat is hung. These collars are considered
    >strangle-proof and release when approximately seven pounds of pressure
    >is applied. This way, the cat can break him--or her--self free from any
    >snare.
    >
    >Furthermore, there are many different types of collars on the market.
    >Bring your feline friend with you to the local pet-friendly pet store
    >and try on several different types of collars until you find one that
    >best fits. Avoid choosing a harness for outdoor cats unless you plan
    >on walking the cat on a leash. If this is the case, only allow your
    >cat to wear a harness while supervised, as most are not snare-proof.
    >
    >On a whole, collars are encouraged on cats that spend their time
    >outside and inside. In addition to providing visibility to your
    >animal, the collar will hold valuable identification information that
    >will protect your cat and assist you in finding your pet.
    >http://cncarrental.cn/html/business/20061001/40280.html


    Barry
    =====
    Home page
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og
    Barry OGrady, Mar 24, 2008
    #2
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  3. Barry OGrady wrote:
    > On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 00:14:18 -0800 (PST), 88059355 <> wrote:
    >
    >> Most cat owners find themselves in a quandary over whether or not to
    >> use a cat collar on their outdoor cats. The debate still reigns over
    >> the pros and cons of outfitting an outside cat with a collar, but many
    >> veterinarians and cat experts agree that collars are the best way to
    >> go. However, before you decide, take a look at these pros and cons:

    >
    > Are we talking fibre, coax, UTP, or wireless?


    ---> Perhaps wireless, vis-a-vis "Invisible Fence"? :)

    >
    >
    >
    >> Pros:
    >>
    >> ? Cat collars can hold identification and registration tags. This is
    >> critical in case your outdoor cat becomes lost or is picked up by a
    >> concerned individual. Also, collars can hold bells or other noise
    >> generating items to scare away potential prey.


    ---> Definitely sounds like wireless to me...

    >>
    >> ? Many cat collars are equipped with reflective material. Whether the
    >> collar is made completely out of reflective material or only contains
    >> a small strip, this will help your cat to become more visible in the
    >> dark. Cats, especially those of dark color, can become invisible at
    >> night, which is a potentially dangerous situation.
    >>


    ---> The reflective material will help MIMO-enabled devices take
    advantage of the additional RF-multipath

    >> Cons:
    >>
    >> ? Cat collars can easily snag and cause your cat to become hung or
    >> stuck on branches, fences, or anything else in the great outdoors.
    >> Some cats have actually been strangled when their collar has gotten
    >> caught and cut off the animal's air supply.
    >>


    ---> N/A for an 802.1n implementation

    >> ? Your cat may not be comfortable wearing a collar or the collar may
    >> be too heavy for the animal.
    >>


    ---> Yeah, the MIMO antenna array might be troublesome, too...

    >> Given these pros and cons, consider choosing a collar that will
    >> maximize the positives and minimize the negatives. For example, there
    >> are many collars on the market that are specially designed to break
    >> away or unclasp when the cat is hung. These collars are considered
    >> strangle-proof and release when approximately seven pounds of pressure
    >> is applied. This way, the cat can break him--or her--self free from any
    >> snare.
    >>


    ---> In addition, kitty needs appropriate measures to be taken so that
    he/she doesn't get their eyes poked out by said MIMO array...

    >> Furthermore, there are many different types of collars on the market.
    >> Bring your feline friend with you to the local pet-friendly pet store
    >> and try on several different types of collars until you find one that
    >> best fits. Avoid choosing a harness for outdoor cats unless you plan
    >> on walking the cat on a leash. If this is the case, only allow your
    >> cat to wear a harness while supervised, as most are not snare-proof.
    >>


    ---> If MIMO proves troublesome, look into prox-cards...

    >> On a whole, collars are encouraged on cats that spend their time
    >> outside and inside. In addition to providing visibility to your
    >> animal, the collar will hold valuable identification information that
    >> will protect your cat and assist you in finding your pet.
    >> http://cncarrental.cn/html/business/20061001/40280.html

    >


    ---> If proper 802.1X NAC standards are implemented, kitty will be safe
    in that only allowed catting-around (roaming) will be allowed...

    > Barry
    > =====
    > Home page
    > http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og
    fugettaboutit, Mar 24, 2008
    #3
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