Should i study MCDST?

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by lisa20, Aug 9, 2007.

  1. lisa20

    lisa20 Guest

    Hi all, i was just curious if this would be right for me..im 20 and have been
    taking computer classes all the way thru high school, and i have NCEA
    Computing level 2 & 3, and MOS certificates (all but outlook & project),
    would i be able to do MCDST or would it not be right for me? and if not does
    anyone have any sugestions to what might be..i also havent had a job in
    computers..
    Thanks - Lisa
    lisa20, Aug 9, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "lisa20" <> wrote in message
    news::

    > Hi all, i was just curious if this would be right for me..im 20 and have been
    > taking computer classes all the way thru high school, and i have NCEA
    > Computing level 2 & 3, and MOS certificates (all but outlook & project),
    > would i be able to do MCDST or would it not be right for me? and if not does
    > anyone have any sugestions to what might be..i also havent had a job in
    > computers..
    > Thanks - Lisa


    Certifications are for those with proven experience in the skill set
    they wish to certify on. Without having this "necessary" experience, and
    achieving the MCDST, or any certification for that matter, will do a
    disservice to those experienced individuals holding the certification
    and the certification programs themselves. I understand this brings up
    the chicken and the egg dilemma, but remember a circle has no beginning.
    Meaning if you lack experience, it is up to you to get experience --
    somehow.

    Furthermore, except for the information you provided, it is difficult
    for us to provide a intelligent response to your inquire. Do you enjoy
    diagnosing and troubleshooting Windows XP Profession in a
    workgroup/domain environment? In other words, what do you want to do
    when you grow up?
    --
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST
    The I.T. Classroom - http://www.theitclassroom.com/
    CertGuard, Inc. - http://www.certguard.com
    Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.], Aug 9, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. lisa20

    lisa20 Guest

    im guessing by using grow up, you quite older than me? im not sure what i
    want to do as a career. im good with Microsoft Office programs, and know
    things about computers. theres a place where you can study MCDST and it says
    you dont need any experience just some knowledge of certain things, thats why
    i thought i would find out a bit more about it first, but if you need so much
    experience to take it then alot of people might not have it..to some people
    its not so much the case do you like doing it, it might just be what your
    good at

    "Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.]" wrote:

    > "lisa20" <> wrote in message
    > news::
    >
    > > Hi all, i was just curious if this would be right for me..im 20 and have been
    > > taking computer classes all the way thru high school, and i have NCEA
    > > Computing level 2 & 3, and MOS certificates (all but outlook & project),
    > > would i be able to do MCDST or would it not be right for me? and if not does
    > > anyone have any sugestions to what might be..i also havent had a job in
    > > computers..
    > > Thanks - Lisa

    >
    > Certifications are for those with proven experience in the skill set
    > they wish to certify on. Without having this "necessary" experience, and
    > achieving the MCDST, or any certification for that matter, will do a
    > disservice to those experienced individuals holding the certification
    > and the certification programs themselves. I understand this brings up
    > the chicken and the egg dilemma, but remember a circle has no beginning.
    > Meaning if you lack experience, it is up to you to get experience --
    > somehow.
    >
    > Furthermore, except for the information you provided, it is difficult
    > for us to provide a intelligent response to your inquire. Do you enjoy
    > diagnosing and troubleshooting Windows XP Profession in a
    > workgroup/domain environment? In other words, what do you want to do
    > when you grow up?
    > --
    > Michael D. Alligood,
    > MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST
    > The I.T. Classroom - http://www.theitclassroom.com/
    > CertGuard, Inc. - http://www.certguard.com
    >
    >
    >
    lisa20, Aug 9, 2007
    #3
  4. lisa20

    lisa20 Guest

    i have a friend studying MSCE and MSCA who has no work experience but he has
    taken courses for things that might be in it..as i said in the other post i
    dont know what i want to do and its hard not knowing..thank you for replying
    tho : )

    "Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.]" wrote:

    > "lisa20" <> wrote in message
    > news::
    >
    > > Hi all, i was just curious if this would be right for me..im 20 and have been
    > > taking computer classes all the way thru high school, and i have NCEA
    > > Computing level 2 & 3, and MOS certificates (all but outlook & project),
    > > would i be able to do MCDST or would it not be right for me? and if not does
    > > anyone have any sugestions to what might be..i also havent had a job in
    > > computers..
    > > Thanks - Lisa

    >
    > Certifications are for those with proven experience in the skill set
    > they wish to certify on. Without having this "necessary" experience, and
    > achieving the MCDST, or any certification for that matter, will do a
    > disservice to those experienced individuals holding the certification
    > and the certification programs themselves. I understand this brings up
    > the chicken and the egg dilemma, but remember a circle has no beginning.
    > Meaning if you lack experience, it is up to you to get experience --
    > somehow.
    >
    > Furthermore, except for the information you provided, it is difficult
    > for us to provide a intelligent response to your inquire. Do you enjoy
    > diagnosing and troubleshooting Windows XP Profession in a
    > workgroup/domain environment? In other words, what do you want to do
    > when you grow up?
    > --
    > Michael D. Alligood,
    > MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST
    > The I.T. Classroom - http://www.theitclassroom.com/
    > CertGuard, Inc. - http://www.certguard.com
    >
    >
    >
    lisa20, Aug 9, 2007
    #4
  5. "lisa20" <> wrote in message
    news::

    > i have a friend studying MSCE and MSCA who has no work experience but he has
    > taken courses for things that might be in it..as i said in the other post i
    > dont know what i want to do and its hard not knowing..thank you for replying
    > tho : )
    >
    > "Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.]" wrote:
    >

    I am responding to both your responses in this post. First, the "what do
    you want to be when you grow up" comment was a euphemism. However, I am
    11 years older than you, but I digress. Point being, is this the field
    you want to pursue? Have you done research on this certification on the
    Microsoft Learning site?

    There are tons of places that one can get certified. The most notable
    are Computer Learning Centers such as Fast Train or New Horizon to name
    a couple. However a majority of these "learning institutes" are only
    interested in receiving your money -- and lots of it. I am not saying
    that these centers have nothing to offer, but you are normally receiving
    information from an Account Executive who knows nothing more than the
    best ways to "offer" these courses to you to become certified.

    You see, the true crux of the certification program is that anyone can
    take the exams and become certified without experience. Ask yourself
    this: Would you want a doctor inexperienced in a certain field of
    medicine tinkering around with your illness? This example can be used in
    any profession -- including the I.T. field. Companies want to know that
    when their hire you that you are experienced in the areas they need you
    to fill. The issue with this is HR departments reflect their hiring
    procedures on certifications. "If you hold an MCSE, are self sufficient,
    and a hard worker, please fax your resume to 555-555-5555. Notice that
    experience was never mentioned. This is, unfortunately, not uncommon. It
    is up to us to certify the correct way. Experience leads to
    certifications, not vice versa. I hope this helps you and I wish you
    luck in deciding what you wish to do... when you grow up! :)

    --
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST
    The I.T. Classroom - http://www.theitclassroom.com/
    CertGuard, Inc. - http://www.certguard.com
    Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.], Aug 9, 2007
    #5
  6. lisa20

    lisa20 Guest

    yea i get what you mean by institutes wanting the money. yes i looked up info
    on MCDST and i did a sample test thing aswell, altho it only gave 12
    questions for 271 & 272..i havnt heard of thos 2 places you can learn it as i
    live in NZ and only know of one..i also get what you mean about an
    inexperience doctor, but also studying to be a doctor you learn what to do
    and have experience while studying and would become a intern or however it
    works..i thought the reason why you take a course and study was to learn how
    to do things and get more knowledge to what you already know..i understand
    the experience to certification, but over here its hard to get experience as
    in job wise without certification..you kinda have to get certification and
    hope there is someone kind enough out there to take you on to get experience
    enough to get something better..but yes i will think hard about what i want
    to do, thanks again :eek:)

    "Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.]" wrote:

    > "lisa20" <> wrote in message
    > news::
    >
    > > i have a friend studying MSCE and MSCA who has no work experience but he has
    > > taken courses for things that might be in it..as i said in the other post i
    > > dont know what i want to do and its hard not knowing..thank you for replying
    > > tho : )
    > >
    > > "Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.]" wrote:
    > >

    > I am responding to both your responses in this post. First, the "what do
    > you want to be when you grow up" comment was a euphemism. However, I am
    > 11 years older than you, but I digress. Point being, is this the field
    > you want to pursue? Have you done research on this certification on the
    > Microsoft Learning site?
    >
    > There are tons of places that one can get certified. The most notable
    > are Computer Learning Centers such as Fast Train or New Horizon to name
    > a couple. However a majority of these "learning institutes" are only
    > interested in receiving your money -- and lots of it. I am not saying
    > that these centers have nothing to offer, but you are normally receiving
    > information from an Account Executive who knows nothing more than the
    > best ways to "offer" these courses to you to become certified.
    >
    > You see, the true crux of the certification program is that anyone can
    > take the exams and become certified without experience. Ask yourself
    > this: Would you want a doctor inexperienced in a certain field of
    > medicine tinkering around with your illness? This example can be used in
    > any profession -- including the I.T. field. Companies want to know that
    > when their hire you that you are experienced in the areas they need you
    > to fill. The issue with this is HR departments reflect their hiring
    > procedures on certifications. "If you hold an MCSE, are self sufficient,
    > and a hard worker, please fax your resume to 555-555-5555. Notice that
    > experience was never mentioned. This is, unfortunately, not uncommon. It
    > is up to us to certify the correct way. Experience leads to
    > certifications, not vice versa. I hope this helps you and I wish you
    > luck in deciding what you wish to do... when you grow up! :)
    >
    > --
    > Michael D. Alligood,
    > MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST
    > The I.T. Classroom - http://www.theitclassroom.com/
    > CertGuard, Inc. - http://www.certguard.com
    >
    >
    >
    lisa20, Aug 9, 2007
    #6
  7. lisa20

    John R Guest

    "unspeakable" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I said this many times before and I will say it again. If you have to study
    >for the MCDST exams, you should be looking for another career path. Those
    >are the most basic tests, testing the most basic skills.
    >
    >
    >

    Well, aren't you just special!

    You seem to think that audit policies, lock out policies, group policies,
    understanding what tracert gives you vrs ping, understanding why home
    edition can't join a domain, or for that matter, what a domain is, what
    benefits there are to the MLUI, what an IME is, deploying XP to 2000
    desktops using RIS, how NTFS permissions differ from share permissions, what
    'offline files' are, why hardware profiles are important, RAID, how tcp/ip
    works, and just what all that stuff in performance monitor means is all just
    the most basic skills that everyone who has ever turned on an XP box
    intuitively knows.

    I guess my thinking is way off base because I would have bet everything I
    own on the fact that 99.3% of all XP users out there could not have even
    formed that little rant of mine, let alone have even heard of or have even a
    basic knowledge of those items.

    But, that's just me. Of course, I have respect for those who have earned
    MCDST or any other certification for that matter.

    John R
    John R, Aug 9, 2007
    #7
  8. lisa20

    Jo Guest

    John:

    Yes, this person is "special", but we can't speak of that "specialness" on
    this post, if you know what I mean. Okay, who died and appointed this guy
    GOD of the MCDST?

    Anybody else like to comment on this super wonderful person's comments? I
    can't talk right now, because I'm too enraged to jump over the fence
    and......recomposure...breath slowly... Sorry, I just can't go there without
    thinking that someone needs to show this guy the door.

    --
    Motochick


    "John R" wrote:

    >
    > "unspeakable" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I said this many times before and I will say it again. If you have to study
    > >for the MCDST exams, you should be looking for another career path. Those
    > >are the most basic tests, testing the most basic skills.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > Well, aren't you just special!
    >
    > You seem to think that audit policies, lock out policies, group policies,
    > understanding what tracert gives you vrs ping, understanding why home
    > edition can't join a domain, or for that matter, what a domain is, what
    > benefits there are to the MLUI, what an IME is, deploying XP to 2000
    > desktops using RIS, how NTFS permissions differ from share permissions, what
    > 'offline files' are, why hardware profiles are important, RAID, how tcp/ip
    > works, and just what all that stuff in performance monitor means is all just
    > the most basic skills that everyone who has ever turned on an XP box
    > intuitively knows.
    >
    > I guess my thinking is way off base because I would have bet everything I
    > own on the fact that 99.3% of all XP users out there could not have even
    > formed that little rant of mine, let alone have even heard of or have even a
    > basic knowledge of those items.
    >
    > But, that's just me. Of course, I have respect for those who have earned
    > MCDST or any other certification for that matter.
    >
    > John R
    >
    >
    >
    Jo, Aug 9, 2007
    #8
  9. lisa20

    djpimpdaddy Guest

    Amen John!

    I agree. I though I knew a lot about XP from years of experience
    supporting it but I was dead wrong. There were soooo many things that
    I learned about while studying for my MCDST that ended up further
    benefiting my company. I used my certification to break beyond my
    knowledge barrier so to speak. I can say though, that without that
    experience, the tests, studying, and certification would have been
    useless.

    I am in a similar situation now studying for my MCSE. I have a job
    where I can kinda dabble with the domain to a point to use while
    learning specific topics, but there will be a lot of high end stuff
    that I will not have access to do. So to take the tests, I will have
    to place my faith in what the book/technet says. As a result of this,
    I am lookin for a job where I can break the next barrier. Like the
    chicken abd egg scenerio, I need a better job to get more certified.
    Hope this confuses everyone deeply.

    Main point to take away: You need experience to a point, otherwise it
    is blind memorization.
    djpimpdaddy, Aug 9, 2007
    #9
  10. lisa20

    John R Guest

    "catwalker63" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9987B4668C550catwalker63athotmail@216.196.97.136...
    >
    > You can also get experience by setting up a lab. That way you aren't
    > meddling with the servers and, oops!, shutdown the server with the
    > database during month end close. You need to break a certain amount of
    > stuff to really learn but it's better if you don't break something
    > someone's actually using.
    >


    Sure, go ahead, take all the fun out of the job, see if I care :)

    John R
    John R, Aug 10, 2007
    #10
  11. I agree with Catwalker.

    My opinion: Anytime that anyone is motivated enough to study and take tests
    is Great. Even if you don't pass the test, you are still trying and that's
    what counts. So, to all of those that are trying so hard, keep up the good
    work and don't let anyone shoot you down. Studying does increase your
    knowledge. Books just for practical knowledge? I disagree. I have taken a
    class at a local very reputable school on Networking. I had some hands on
    in the class but geuss what? I learned more from studying for the
    Certification test after the class then I did while in class. I work in a
    Help Desk and work with people that don't study and have no clue what they
    are doing with hands on in the IT department. You can see a huge difference
    between those that study and those that only learn what they have to at
    work. So, keep on studying. If you don't have the experience yet, you will
    have a better chance of getting that experience if you keep hitting the
    books and tests. Use whatever tools you can for studying. Use the
    evaluation copies of software. Do what you can and keep it up. My boss is
    thrilled that I am studying for more certs. I know that certs alone are not
    the only thing they look at for climbing the ladder. I know that you have
    to start at the bottom and work your way up. I'm the only one in my
    department that has any certifications. I'm also the only one that is
    trying to improve their skills. Most think that experience alone is enough.
    The problem with that way of thinking is that others have to teach them
    everything. That's irritating. Those that assert themselves, show self
    discipiline and high motivation will be much more successful. Kudos to
    those that study!
    On that note, I'm going to study some more.

    Sandy

    "catwalker63" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns998BB50122DC4catwalker63athotmail@216.196.97.136...
    > "unspeakable" <> prattled ceaselessly in
    > news::
    >
    >> Of course I read books. But for practial knowledge. Not to learn how
    >> to pass a test. You guys are missing the whole point of my post. It is
    >> not about arrogance, its about truth. Studying for an exam does not
    >> make you smart, passing an exam does not make you smart. Being smart
    >> makes you smart. A person who has been in IT for a while and is worth
    >> his weight, should have absolutly no problem passing either of the
    >> MCDST exams. If you have been in IT for a while and can't pass these
    >> basic tests, you should consider another career.
    >>

    >
    > Because we've worked in IT for a while we know everything? I know
    > bunches about XP but studying for the exams filled in blanks in areas
    > where I don't do things the MS way or with regard to features I have no
    > use for. You are making blanket statements based on your own limited
    > experience and world view. Don't assume everyone learns the same way you
    > do or is somehow defective if they study for these exams. Experience is
    > key but that doesn't mean that someone who doesn't pass without studying
    > is somehow in the wrong field.
    >
    > Wait. It is about arrogance.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Catwalker
    > MCNGP #43
    > www.mcngp.com
    > "Definitely not wearing any underwear."
    Sandythegeek2, Aug 14, 2007
    #11
  12. lisa20

    John R Guest

    "unspeakable" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This post makes my point. If you are an "IT pro" you should have basic
    > knowledge of all the subjects that the MCDST is testing for. I have the
    > MCDST, as well as the MCSA+M, and I did not study for any of the exams. If
    > you are trying to read a book to help you pass these exams, without the
    > real world knowledge to go with it, you more than likely are not going to
    > pass. People out there think that if they read a book, get thris cert,
    > then they will all of a sudden be a computer genius and get the glorious
    > job, fancy car, and wonderful prizes. Certs are a validation of skills,
    > but passing the exams does not give you the skills...
    >
    >
    > "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> "unspeakable" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I said this many times before and I will say it again. If you have to
    >>>study for the MCDST exams, you should be looking for another career path.
    >>>Those are the most basic tests, testing the most basic skills.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Well, aren't you just special!
    >>
    >> You seem to think that audit policies, lock out policies, group policies,
    >> understanding what tracert gives you vrs ping, understanding why home
    >> edition can't join a domain, or for that matter, what a domain is, what
    >> benefits there are to the MLUI, what an IME is, deploying XP to 2000
    >> desktops using RIS, how NTFS permissions differ from share permissions,
    >> what 'offline files' are, why hardware profiles are important, RAID, how
    >> tcp/ip works, and just what all that stuff in performance monitor means
    >> is all just the most basic skills that everyone who has ever turned on an
    >> XP box intuitively knows.
    >>
    >> I guess my thinking is way off base because I would have bet everything I
    >> own on the fact that 99.3% of all XP users out there could not have even
    >> formed that little rant of mine, let alone have even heard of or have
    >> even a basic knowledge of those items.
    >>
    >> But, that's just me. Of course, I have respect for those who have earned
    >> MCDST or any other certification for that matter.
    >>
    >> John R
    >>

    >
    >


    My point wasn't as subtle as yours. One can sucessfully be a desktop
    support technician, supporting possibly hundreds of XP desktops, and never
    even hear about RIS. When your employer comes to you and says "How are we
    going to deploy Windows Vista to 200 desktops, your answer might be "I'll do
    10 each week until we get them all updated". That answer might be perfectly
    acceptable to your employer. However, if you study for MCDST (ie, you pick
    up a book and read), you will learn about RIS and maybe you'll set it up and
    deploy it to every desktop with 8 to 12 hours work instead of 400 hours.
    This leaves you with about 390 hours to get other things accomplished. If
    your employer wants to push out a new application that only runs on Vista,
    that will have to wait until you can get to it. The point here is that
    studying for MCDST helps expose you to things you never knew existed, and
    that leads to better productivity. You might be the best tech your company
    has ever seen, but that doesn't mean you're not loosing valuable time if you
    don't know ALL your options.

    John R
    John R, Aug 20, 2007
    #12
  13. lisa20

    Montreal MCT Guest

    Here is where my point of experience over book-study proves right: I think
    studying the books is extremely important, and for passing the exams it is
    probably your best course.

    However to be a really good IT Professional you have to know by now that
    since the release of Windows Server SP2 RIS has been supplanted by Windows
    Deployment Services (WDS), a much heralded and welcome new technology that
    is much more manageable and easier to use.

    By all means, read the books. But if you want to excel do not stop learning
    once you pass your exams. Don't stop reading newer books, and on-line
    articles, and magazines, and white-papers. Keep your mind's sponge going
    and the next exam you prepare for will require less preparation.

    M

    --
    Mitch Garvis, MCT
    MCSA, MCITP, MCDST, MCTS
    Microsoft MVP: Windows Server - Customer Experience
    Visit my blog at http://blog.mitchgarvis.com
    ---
    "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    news:e$...
    >
    > "unspeakable" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> This post makes my point. If you are an "IT pro" you should have basic
    >> knowledge of all the subjects that the MCDST is testing for. I have the
    >> MCDST, as well as the MCSA+M, and I did not study for any of the exams.
    >> If you are trying to read a book to help you pass these exams, without
    >> the real world knowledge to go with it, you more than likely are not
    >> going to pass. People out there think that if they read a book, get thris
    >> cert, then they will all of a sudden be a computer genius and get the
    >> glorious job, fancy car, and wonderful prizes. Certs are a validation of
    >> skills, but passing the exams does not give you the skills...
    >>
    >>
    >> "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>
    >>> "unspeakable" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>>I said this many times before and I will say it again. If you have to
    >>>>study for the MCDST exams, you should be looking for another career
    >>>>path. Those are the most basic tests, testing the most basic skills.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Well, aren't you just special!
    >>>
    >>> You seem to think that audit policies, lock out policies, group
    >>> policies, understanding what tracert gives you vrs ping, understanding
    >>> why home edition can't join a domain, or for that matter, what a domain
    >>> is, what benefits there are to the MLUI, what an IME is, deploying XP to
    >>> 2000 desktops using RIS, how NTFS permissions differ from share
    >>> permissions, what 'offline files' are, why hardware profiles are
    >>> important, RAID, how tcp/ip works, and just what all that stuff in
    >>> performance monitor means is all just the most basic skills that
    >>> everyone who has ever turned on an XP box intuitively knows.
    >>>
    >>> I guess my thinking is way off base because I would have bet everything
    >>> I own on the fact that 99.3% of all XP users out there could not have
    >>> even formed that little rant of mine, let alone have even heard of or
    >>> have even a basic knowledge of those items.
    >>>
    >>> But, that's just me. Of course, I have respect for those who have
    >>> earned MCDST or any other certification for that matter.
    >>>
    >>> John R
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    > My point wasn't as subtle as yours. One can sucessfully be a desktop
    > support technician, supporting possibly hundreds of XP desktops, and never
    > even hear about RIS. When your employer comes to you and says "How are we
    > going to deploy Windows Vista to 200 desktops, your answer might be "I'll
    > do 10 each week until we get them all updated". That answer might be
    > perfectly acceptable to your employer. However, if you study for MCDST
    > (ie, you pick up a book and read), you will learn about RIS and maybe
    > you'll set it up and deploy it to every desktop with 8 to 12 hours work
    > instead of 400 hours. This leaves you with about 390 hours to get other
    > things accomplished. If your employer wants to push out a new application
    > that only runs on Vista, that will have to wait until you can get to it.
    > The point here is that studying for MCDST helps expose you to things you
    > never knew existed, and that leads to better productivity. You might be
    > the best tech your company has ever seen, but that doesn't mean you're not
    > loosing valuable time if you don't know ALL your options.
    >
    > John R
    >
    Montreal MCT, Aug 20, 2007
    #13
  14. lisa20

    John R Guest

    "Montreal MCT" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Here is where my point of experience over book-study proves right: I
    > think studying the books is extremely important, and for passing the exams
    > it is probably your best course.
    >
    > However to be a really good IT Professional you have to know by now that
    > since the release of Windows Server SP2 RIS has been supplanted by Windows
    > Deployment Services (WDS), a much heralded and welcome new technology that
    > is much more manageable and easier to use.
    >
    > By all means, read the books. But if you want to excel do not stop
    > learning once you pass your exams. Don't stop reading newer books, and
    > on-line articles, and magazines, and white-papers. Keep your mind's
    > sponge going and the next exam you prepare for will require less
    > preparation.
    >
    > M
    >
    > --


    I guess I should have picked SUS for my example... No, wait, that has been
    replaced with WSUS.
    Ok, ok, maybe I should have picked the group policy editor... No, that's
    been replaced with the GPMC.
    Ok, ok, maybe I should have picked... no, that too. Geeze.

    Mitch's advise is very important. In this field, the learning never stops.
    Even more of a reason to make sure you always know "all" your options.

    Technology seems to have a half-life of about 2-3 years in IT. My dad drove
    a truck for 35 years, and the only technology improvement in his job over
    that time was the addition of air conditioning, and FM radio. (Well, ok,
    there were some improvements under the hood like fuel injection, but nothing
    that affected how he performed his job, and no, he didn't "upgrade" to an
    automatic transmission over that time).

    BTW, how many shops out there are on SP2, lol :)

    John R
    John R, Aug 21, 2007
    #14
  15. lisa20

    Ronald Guest

    Hi
    What type of job are you looking for? Perhaps once you discover that then
    you can pursue a certification that is geared toward the type of job you want.



    Best Regards

    "lisa20" wrote:

    > Hi all, i was just curious if this would be right for me..im 20 and have been
    > taking computer classes all the way thru high school, and i have NCEA
    > Computing level 2 & 3, and MOS certificates (all but outlook & project),
    > would i be able to do MCDST or would it not be right for me? and if not does
    > anyone have any sugestions to what might be..i also havent had a job in
    > computers..
    > Thanks - Lisa
    Ronald, Dec 11, 2007
    #15
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