Shot from 1930's cartoon

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Just Another Digital Fan, Dec 27, 2006.

  1. Just Another Digital Fan, Dec 27, 2006
    #1
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  2. Just Another Digital Fan

    clough Guest

    On 27 Dec 2006 11:46:01 -0800, "Just Another Digital Fan"
    <> wrote:

    >Screen still from an old black and white Bimbo (Betty Boop) cartoon.


    >I kid yee not. I have not messed about with it at all.


    >http://members.aol.com/smellyfartybum/bandit.jpg


    In the USA in the 1920's and 30's the word 'Bum' meant 'down and out'.

    Clough
    clough, Dec 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. Just Another Digital Fan

    Pat P Guest

    "clough" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 27 Dec 2006 11:46:01 -0800, "Just Another Digital Fan"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Screen still from an old black and white Bimbo (Betty Boop) cartoon.

    >
    >>I kid yee not. I have not messed about with it at all.

    >
    >>http://members.aol.com/smellyfartybum/bandit.jpg

    >
    > In the USA in the 1920's and 30's the word 'Bum' meant 'down and out'.
    >
    > Clough


    It still does, as I am sure everyone knows.

    Pat
    Pat P, Dec 28, 2006
    #3
  4. Just Another Digital Fan

    J. Clarke Guest

    On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 17:26:26 +0000, Pat P wrote:

    > "clough" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On 27 Dec 2006 11:46:01 -0800, "Just Another Digital Fan"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Screen still from an old black and white Bimbo (Betty Boop) cartoon.

    >>
    >>>I kid yee not. I have not messed about with it at all.

    >>
    >>>http://members.aol.com/smellyfartybum/bandit.jpg

    >>
    >> In the USA in the 1920's and 30's the word 'Bum' meant 'down and out'.
    >>
    >> Clough

    >
    > It still does, as I am sure everyone knows.


    I think you might be surprised. I haven't heard a bum referred to as a
    "bum" in a long time.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Dec 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Just Another Digital Fan

    Alex Heney Guest

    On 28 Dec 2006 18:00:26 GMT, "J. Clarke" <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 17:26:26 +0000, Pat P wrote:
    >
    >> "clough" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 27 Dec 2006 11:46:01 -0800, "Just Another Digital Fan"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Screen still from an old black and white Bimbo (Betty Boop) cartoon.
    >>>
    >>>>I kid yee not. I have not messed about with it at all.
    >>>
    >>>>http://members.aol.com/smellyfartybum/bandit.jpg
    >>>
    >>> In the USA in the 1920's and 30's the word 'Bum' meant 'down and out'.
    >>>
    >>> Clough

    >>
    >> It still does, as I am sure everyone knows.

    >
    >I think you might be surprised. I haven't heard a bum referred to as a
    >"bum" in a long time.


    The term "ski bum" is still in common usage for people who spend an
    entire season in a ski resort, staying in the cheapest accommodation
    that can be found (sometimes the back of a van!), and doing odd jobs
    to make ends meet.
    --
    Alex Heney, Global Villager
    I'm easy to please as long as I get my way.
    To reply by email, my address is alexATheneyDOTplusDOTcom
    Alex Heney, Dec 28, 2006
    #5
  6. Just Another Digital Fan

    Aaron B Guest

    "Alex Heney" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 28 Dec 2006 18:00:26 GMT, "J. Clarke" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 17:26:26 +0000, Pat P wrote:
    >>
    >>> "clough" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> On 27 Dec 2006 11:46:01 -0800, "Just Another Digital Fan"
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Screen still from an old black and white Bimbo (Betty Boop) cartoon.
    >>>>
    >>>>>I kid yee not. I have not messed about with it at all.
    >>>>
    >>>>>http://members.aol.com/smellyfartybum/bandit.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> In the USA in the 1920's and 30's the word 'Bum' meant 'down and out'.
    >>>>
    >>>> Clough
    >>>
    >>> It still does, as I am sure everyone knows.

    >>
    >>I think you might be surprised. I haven't heard a bum referred to as a
    >>"bum" in a long time.

    >
    > The term "ski bum" is still in common usage for people who spend an
    > entire season in a ski resort, staying in the cheapest accommodation
    > that can be found (sometimes the back of a van!), and doing odd jobs
    > to make ends meet.

    A bit like a beach bum, I suppose. Similar thing but, well, on beaches and
    not ski slopes!!
    Aaron B, Dec 28, 2006
    #6
  7. Just Another Digital Fan

    Frank ess Guest

    Alex Heney wrote:
    > On 28 Dec 2006 18:00:26 GMT, "J. Clarke" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 17:26:26 +0000, Pat P wrote:
    >>
    >>> "clough" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> On 27 Dec 2006 11:46:01 -0800, "Just Another Digital Fan"
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Screen still from an old black and white Bimbo (Betty Boop)
    >>>>> cartoon.
    >>>>
    >>>>> I kid yee not. I have not messed about with it at all.
    >>>>
    >>>>> http://members.aol.com/smellyfartybum/bandit.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> In the USA in the 1920's and 30's the word 'Bum' meant 'down and
    >>>> out'.
    >>>>
    >>>> Clough
    >>>
    >>> It still does, as I am sure everyone knows.

    >>
    >> I think you might be surprised. I haven't heard a bum referred to
    >> as a "bum" in a long time.

    >
    > The term "ski bum" is still in common usage for people who spend an
    > entire season in a ski resort, staying in the cheapest accommodation
    > that can be found (sometimes the back of a van!), and doing odd jobs
    > to make ends meet.


    O' course over here we got "surf bums", a latterly semi-affectionate
    term for folks who love to ride the ocean waves and do not invest much
    in much of anything else.

    My (English heritage) grandmother's strongest epithet was "bum", in
    the not-a-productive-citizen sense, and she called your situpon a
    "bum" in the Britspeak buttocks sense.

    I thought I knew "bum" was someone of no means and little motivation
    to acquire them by labor; "hobo" was a down-and-outer who moved from
    place to place in search of short-term gainful employment, and who
    wasn't always thrilled when he found it, all other things being equal.

    "Bum" is also a verb: one "bums" a cigarette, a dime for a cup of
    coffee, a ride to the Mission.

    --
    Frank ess
    "Verbing weirds language".
    -Calvin
    Frank ess, Dec 28, 2006
    #7
  8. Frank ess wrote:

    > "Bum" is also a verb: one "bums" a cigarette, a dime for a cup of
    > coffee, a ride to the Mission.


    Thank you for clearing that up. I'd always thought that Bum Bandit was
    Homo' talk....
    Just Another Residents Fan, Dec 28, 2006
    #8
  9. Just Another Digital Fan

    AlanG Guest

    On 28 Dec 2006 14:59:08 -0800, "Just Another Residents Fan"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >Frank ess wrote:
    >
    >> "Bum" is also a verb: one "bums" a cigarette, a dime for a cup of
    >> coffee, a ride to the Mission.

    >
    >Thank you for clearing that up. I'd always thought that Bum Bandit was
    >Homo' talk....


    To keep on topic I actually have a Betty Boop 1930s silent cartoon.
    Unfortunately my son broke the 9.5mm projector about 30 years ago so
    it has never played since. Got about another 20 reels of various kinds
    including felix popeye and hopalong cassidy. Newest is space dog. A
    short purporting to be a record of the flight of the first animal in
    space the dog Laika.

    If anyone knows of a place that sells spares for a 9.5mm projector
    I'd like to know
    AlanG, Dec 28, 2006
    #9
  10. Just Another Digital Fan

    acl Guest

    AlanG wrote:
    >
    > To keep on topic I actually have a Betty Boop 1930s silent cartoon.
    > Unfortunately my son broke the 9.5mm projector about 30 years ago so
    > it has never played since. Got about another 20 reels of various kinds
    > including felix popeye and hopalong cassidy. Newest is space dog. A
    > short purporting to be a record of the flight of the first animal in
    > space the dog Laika.
    >
    > If anyone knows of a place that sells spares for a 9.5mm projector
    > I'd like to know


    Well, if he broke it 30 years ago, he should be old enough to be able
    to fix for you now. Or, if he has chosen to be a bum, he can bum one
    from a co-bum of his and lend it to you....


    Sorry.
    acl, Dec 29, 2006
    #10
  11. Just Another Digital Fan

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    AlanG wrote:
    > On 28 Dec 2006 14:59:08 -0800, "Just Another Residents Fan"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Frank ess wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Bum" is also a verb: one "bums" a cigarette, a dime for a cup of
    >>> coffee, a ride to the Mission.

    >> Thank you for clearing that up. I'd always thought that Bum Bandit was
    >> Homo' talk....

    >
    > To keep on topic I actually have a Betty Boop 1930s silent cartoon.
    > Unfortunately my son broke the 9.5mm projector about 30 years ago so
    > it has never played since. Got about another 20 reels of various kinds
    > including felix popeye and hopalong cassidy. Newest is space dog. A
    > short purporting to be a record of the flight of the first animal in
    > space the dog Laika.
    >
    > If anyone knows of a place that sells spares for a 9.5mm projector
    > I'd like to know


    Hi..

    I have absolutely no idea how much they'd charge, but here's a place
    that's willing to copy your original film to a more modern media for you..

    http://www.digitalcopycat.com/cine.html

    Take care.

    Ken
    Ken Weitzel, Dec 29, 2006
    #11
  12. Just Another Digital Fan

    AlanG Guest

    On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 01:04:14 GMT, Ken Weitzel <>
    wrote:

    >AlanG wrote:
    >> On 28 Dec 2006 14:59:08 -0800, "Just Another Residents Fan"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Frank ess wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Bum" is also a verb: one "bums" a cigarette, a dime for a cup of
    >>>> coffee, a ride to the Mission.
    >>> Thank you for clearing that up. I'd always thought that Bum Bandit was
    >>> Homo' talk....

    >>
    >> To keep on topic I actually have a Betty Boop 1930s silent cartoon.
    >> Unfortunately my son broke the 9.5mm projector about 30 years ago so
    >> it has never played since. Got about another 20 reels of various kinds
    >> including felix popeye and hopalong cassidy. Newest is space dog. A
    >> short purporting to be a record of the flight of the first animal in
    >> space the dog Laika.
    >>
    >> If anyone knows of a place that sells spares for a 9.5mm projector
    >> I'd like to know

    >
    >Hi..
    >
    >I have absolutely no idea how much they'd charge, but here's a place
    >that's willing to copy your original film to a more modern media for you..
    >
    >http://www.digitalcopycat.com/cine.html
    >

    £5.11 per 50ft of film.
    I think I'll pass for now
    AlanG, Dec 29, 2006
    #12
  13. Just Another Digital Fan

    Pat P Guest

    "J. Clarke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 17:26:26 +0000, Pat P wrote:
    >
    >> "clough" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 27 Dec 2006 11:46:01 -0800, "Just Another Digital Fan"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Screen still from an old black and white Bimbo (Betty Boop) cartoon.
    >>>
    >>>>I kid yee not. I have not messed about with it at all.
    >>>
    >>>>http://members.aol.com/smellyfartybum/bandit.jpg
    >>>
    >>> In the USA in the 1920's and 30's the word 'Bum' meant 'down and out'.
    >>>
    >>> Clough

    >>
    >> It still does, as I am sure everyone knows.

    >
    > I think you might be surprised. I haven't heard a bum referred to as a
    > "bum" in a long time.
    >
    > --
    > --John
    > to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    > (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)


    I suppose it depends where you live, and your age-group. It`s in quite
    common usage amongst my contemporaries - as in "He`s just a bum!". LOL!

    Pat
    Pat P, Dec 29, 2006
    #13
  14. Just Another Digital Fan

    Pat P Guest

    "Just Another Residents Fan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Frank ess wrote:
    >
    >> "Bum" is also a verb: one "bums" a cigarette, a dime for a cup of
    >> coffee, a ride to the Mission.

    >
    > Thank you for clearing that up. I'd always thought that Bum Bandit was
    > Homo' talk....


    That too! LOL!

    Pat
    Pat P, Dec 29, 2006
    #14
  15. Just Another Digital Fan

    Paul Bartram Guest

    "Pat P" <> wrote

    > I suppose it depends where you live, and your age-group. It`s in quite
    > common usage amongst my contemporaries - as in "He`s just a bum!". LOL!


    Here in Australia, we use 'bummer' to describe something unappealing or
    otherwise 'not good'.

    I guess it could also be a job description, though I've never met one...

    Paul
    Paul Bartram, Dec 29, 2006
    #15
  16. Paul Bartram wrote:
    >
    > Here in Australia, we use 'bummer' to describe something unappealing or
    > otherwise 'not good'.


    This term was used in parts of the US in the 60's, fairly widespread
    among hippies, wannabes and those merely "hip" (a fifties term!)....
    as in:

    "He got busted by the Pigs for an out of date license plate."

    "Bummer, Man."

    Of course, this is IIRC, and knowing YMMV, ETC. Don't know when it first
    came into use in the States, tho, and Wiki didn't help.

    --
    john mcwilliams
    John McWilliams, Dec 29, 2006
    #16
  17. Just Another Digital Fan

    ASAAR Guest

    On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 14:46:41 -0800, John McWilliams wrote:

    >> Here in Australia, we use 'bummer' to describe something unappealing or
    >> otherwise 'not good'.

    >
    > This term was used in parts of the US in the 60's, fairly widespread
    > among hippies, wannabes and those merely "hip" (a fifties term!)....
    > as in:
    >
    > "He got busted by the Pigs for an out of date license plate."
    >
    > "Bummer, Man."
    >
    > Of course, this is IIRC, and knowing YMMV, ETC. Don't know when it first
    > came into use in the States, tho, and Wiki didn't help.


    Nor do I, but IIRC, hip was a 60's term (beatniks in the 50's,
    hippies in the late 60's and early 70's), hip replacing the the 50's
    "hep", which was rapidly becoming squaresville. And hippies begat
    yippies, saith St. Abby in one of the more obscure Tales of
    Hoffmann.
    ASAAR, Dec 29, 2006
    #17
  18. ASAAR wrote:
    > On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 14:46:41 -0800, John McWilliams wrote:
    >
    >>> Here in Australia, we use 'bummer' to describe something unappealing or
    >>> otherwise 'not good'.

    >> This term was used in parts of the US in the 60's, fairly widespread
    >> among hippies, wannabes and those merely "hip" (a fifties term!)....
    >> as in:
    >>
    >> "He got busted by the Pigs for an out of date license plate."
    >>
    >> "Bummer, Man."
    >>
    >> Of course, this is IIRC, and knowing YMMV, ETC. Don't know when it first
    >> came into use in the States, tho, and Wiki didn't help.

    >
    > Nor do I, but IIRC, hip was a 60's term (beatniks in the 50's,
    > hippies in the late 60's and early 70's), hip replacing the the 50's
    > "hep", which was rapidly becoming squaresville. And hippies begat
    > yippies, saith St. Abby in one of the more obscure Tales of
    > Hoffmann.


    Except among those I knew in the 60's, no one would be caught saying
    "That's really hip", unless said ironically. That's "cool" was the
    phrase, dying an early and welcome death, also.

    Hep, as in "He's a real Hep Cat" was also said in an ironic mode, IRRC,
    and I don't care what Abby H. said, ever. I thought "hep' originated in
    the 40's or even 30's. ....

    Probably incorrect to call me and my friends hippies, but rather more
    like many kids on either coast at the time.

    --
    john mcwilliams

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm
    not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    John McWilliams, Dec 30, 2006
    #18
  19. Just Another Digital Fan

    anthonyberet Guest

    anthonyberet, Dec 30, 2006
    #19
  20. Just Another Digital Fan

    ASAAR Guest

    On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:12:45 -0800, John McWilliams wrote:

    > Hep, as in "He's a real Hep Cat" was also said in an ironic mode, IRRC,
    > and I don't care what Abby H. said, ever. I thought "hep' originated in
    > the 40's or even 30's. ....


    I'm sure it did, perhaps a very small percentage of the public
    speaking it and a small but somewhat larger percentage occasionally
    hearing it. Maybe if they listened closely to the lyrics of songs
    by Fats Waller, heard infrequently interviewed musicians, etc. But
    not until it came out of the mouths of such as Dobie Gillis,
    Maynard G. Krebs and others would most people have been aware of
    "hep", and that alone would have been enough to trigger its demise.
    You may not have cared for Abby H., but there was more wit and humor
    in him than was ever contained in Crawford, TX and Kennebunkport, ME
    at any one time, and you can put that in your pipe and smoke it!
    ASAAR, Dec 30, 2006
    #20
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