Sharpening In Photoshop

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Joe, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. Joe

    Joe Guest

    There seems to be a million ways to sharpen images in Photoshop. Anyone
    know of a good tried and tested method? The below method of oversharpening
    the image and then using Edit>Fade seems a simple/effective way of
    sharpening:

    http://www.lonestardigital.com/usm_fade.htm

    Also, why does sharpening need to be done after image re-sizing? As opposed
    to sharpening the original image at full size?
    Joe, Aug 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. Joe

    Roy G Guest

    "Joe" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There seems to be a million ways to sharpen images in Photoshop. Anyone
    > know of a good tried and tested method? The below method of
    > oversharpening the image and then using Edit>Fade seems a simple/effective
    > way of sharpening:
    >
    > http://www.lonestardigital.com/usm_fade.htm
    >
    > Also, why does sharpening need to be done after image re-sizing? As
    > opposed to sharpening the original image at full size?

    If it looks as if it needs sharpening after resizing then sharpen.

    A good way I use is.

    Duplicate layer.

    Apply High Pass Filter at about 10 to new layer.

    In Blending choose Hard Light or Soft Light depending on degree of
    sharpening needed.

    Vary layer Opacity to taste.

    Alternate between sharpened and unsharpened by clicking New layer Eyeball to
    compare.

    When happy, just Flatten image and save.

    Roy G
    Roy G, Aug 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. Joe

    Ben Brugman Guest


    > http://www.lonestardigital.com/usm_fade.htm
    >
    > Also, why does sharpening need to be done after image re-sizing? As
    > opposed to sharpening the original image at full size?

    Sharpening can introduce some artifacts, to avoid getting 'extra' artifacts
    sharpening is posponed to one off the last actions.
    (Sharpening does enhance noise and can introduce halo's).
    Resizing can introduce some softness, because pixels get their information
    from more than one pixel. This can becounteracted a bit by sharpening.

    So first do the resizing then the sharpening.

    In theorie if the sharpening is exactly the oposite of some softening
    function during the picture taking, it would be good to do the sharpening
    as the first action. But although in theorie possible that the sharpening
    is the inverse function of a 'soften' function (for example not correctly
    focused) it is extremely unlikely that the match does correlate enough
    to justify sharpening as a first step.

    >
    Ben Brugman, Aug 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Joe

    Guest

    every image i've ever resized has lost sharpness from the original. so
    i just do it after.

    also,,,you're screwing around with the pixel count when you reduce an
    image, right? so sharpening after makes sense.


    Joe wrote:
    >
    > Also, why does sharpening need to be done after image re-sizing? As opposed
    > to sharpening the original image at full size?
    , Aug 14, 2006
    #4
  5. Joe

    dave444 Guest

    Joe wrote:
    > There seems to be a million ways to sharpen images in Photoshop. Anyone
    > know of a good tried and tested method? The below method of oversharpening
    > the image and then using Edit>Fade seems a simple/effective way of
    > sharpening:


    a common method used by photojourn's is unsharp mask.
    Filter>Sharpen>Unsharp Mask

    it takes a bit of practice but is fast and effective.

    i generally start with the following settings and make adjustments
    according to individual image requirements:
    amount: 90 - 150%
    radius: 0.5 - 1.3
    threshold: 1 - 3

    just remember to zoom in (ctrl +) so that image fills screen. that way
    you can see what effects are taking place when you alter the above
    settings.

    >
    > http://www.lonestardigital.com/usm_fade.htm
    >
    > Also, why does sharpening need to be done after image re-sizing? As opposed
    > to sharpening the original image at full size?


    because photoshop has either removed pixels or added them in depending
    if you made the image smaller or larger. therefore the image has been
    somewhat softened (damaged) by the re-size. that is why it should be
    sharpened after re-size.

    just a side note.
    if you don't already do so, practice using 'curves' instead of
    'levels'. much better for image quality and control.
    also practice with quick mask and feather if you intend to dodge and
    burn parts of your image.
    dave444, Aug 14, 2006
    #5
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