Setting up a home IVR

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by John McKenzie, May 16, 2007.

  1. Greetings, all.

    I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
    here seeking guidiance.

    If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
    and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.

    What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
    and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)

    My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
    I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
    however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    and what type of hardware would I need for this.

    I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
    is out there.

    Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?

    Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html


    It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
    like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.


    Thanks
     
    John McKenzie, May 16, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 05/16/2007 12:27 PM, John McKenzie wrote:
    > Greetings, all.
    >
    > I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
    > here seeking guidiance.
    >
    > If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
    > and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
    >
    > What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
    > and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    > by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    > numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    > computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    > recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    > voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)
    >
    > My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
    > I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
    > however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    > it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    > and what type of hardware would I need for this.
    >
    > I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
    > is out there.
    >
    > Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
    >
    > Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    > http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
    >
    > It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    > I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
    > like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.


    IMHO, the Asterisk running on a Linux machine is a best option to meet
    all your current and, or future needs and, or requirements. Instead of
    an ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter), try finding a suitable card with one
    FXS and one FXO ports.

    --
    Dr Balwinder S "bsd" Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
    Anu'z Linux@HOME Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
    Chandigarh, UT, 160062, India Gentoo, Fedora, Debian/FreeBSD/XP
    Home: http://cto.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit: http://counter.li.org/
     
    Balwinder S \bsd\ Dheeman, May 16, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. John McKenzie

    LVMarc Guest

    pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters wasRe: Setting upa home IVR

    John McKenzie wrote:
    > Greetings, all.
    >
    > I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
    > here seeking guidiance.
    >
    > If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
    > and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
    >
    > What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
    > and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    > by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    > numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    > computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    > recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    > voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)
    >
    > My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
    > I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
    > however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    > it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    > and what type of hardware would I need for this.
    >
    > I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
    > is out there.
    >
    > Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
    >
    > Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    > http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
    >
    >
    > It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    > I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
    > like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
    >
    >
    > Thanks

    you can connect your pstn and voip using combine-a-line.

    and it does not need a usb port and coptuer to operate savings 100's
    dollars in wasted energy use.

    here is a link to combine a line

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...:IT&viewitem=&item=300111295431&rd=1&rd=1voip
    pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters
     
    LVMarc, May 17, 2007
    #3
  4. Balwinder:

    Thank you for your response.

    Could you please elaborate a little on why you suggested a card with
    FXS/FXO ports instead of an ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter)? I am unclear
    if you suggested because it would just be better overall, or because it is
    the only option to make my plan work. (That is to say would an ATA not do
    the things I require?)

    I was looking at that Grandstream ATA because it was cheap, and I do not
    not need a sophesticated PBX set-up or the like. I just want my computer
    to identify an incomming number and either ignore it (and therefore let
    the other phones in the house ring), or send it to voicemail (VM). VM
    would be provided by the computer.

    Is the Grandstream device not capable of this? Due to your recommendation
    I will consider spending the extra money on a card, but I would like to
    understand the situiation before I do.

    LVMarc:

    Thank you for responding as well. I am still not sure what that
    Combine-A-Line thing does or if I need addiational hardware with it.
    (Such as a modem?) Every reference I could find it to was a copy and paste
    of the sames sales pitch, which is somewhat off-puting.
     
    John McKenzie, May 18, 2007
    #4
  5. On 05/18/2007 11:03 AM, John McKenzie wrote:
    > Balwinder:
    >
    > Thank you for your response.


    You're welocme!

    > Could you please elaborate a little on why you suggested a card with
    > FXS/FXO ports instead of an ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter)? I am unclear
    > if you suggested because it would just be better overall, or because it is
    > the only option to make my plan work. (That is to say would an ATA not do
    > the things I require?)


    Just, because you already want to deploy a full fledged machine for
    handling voicemail only, whereas IMHO, almost all the features that
    Gradstream ATA has provides are already available on a linux machine,
    except for the FXO and FXS ports.

    > I was looking at that Grandstream ATA because it was cheap, and I do not
    > not need a sophesticated PBX set-up or the like. I just want my computer
    > to identify an incomming number and either ignore it (and therefore let
    > the other phones in the house ring), or send it to voicemail (VM). VM
    > would be provided by the computer.


    I have not used Grandstream ATA, but I think, it definitely could be an
    embedded Linux gadget somehow; it might also be using Asterisk for
    handling VoIP and, or PSTN calls. BTW, better you read it's manuals and,
    or wait for other people's responses and, or recommendations who have
    used it.

    > Is the Grandstream device not capable of this? Due to your recommendation
    > I will consider spending the extra money on a card, but I would like to
    > understand the situiation before I do.


    I'm not sure that the said and, or any other ATA is capable of sending
    requisite CLI information to a computer, that's why I suggested you to
    buy a card having a minimum of 1 FXO and 1 FXS ports for your machine.

    --
    Dr Balwinder S "bsd" Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
    Anu'z Linux@HOME Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
    Chandigarh, UT, 160062, India Gentoo, Fedora, Debian/FreeBSD/XP
    Home: http://cto.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit: http://counter.li.org/
     
    Balwinder S \bsd\ Dheeman, May 18, 2007
    #5
  6. John McKenzie

    Hongtian Guest

    Re: Setting up a home IVR

    On May 16, 2:57 pm, John McKenzie <> wrote:
    > Greetings, all.
    >
    > I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
    > here seeking guidiance.
    >
    > If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
    > and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
    >
    > What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
    > and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    > by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    > numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    > computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    > recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    > voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)
    >
    > My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
    > I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
    > however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    > it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    > and what type of hardware would I need for this.
    >
    > I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
    > is out there.
    >
    > Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
    >
    > Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    > http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
    >
    > It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    > I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
    > like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
    >
    > Thanks


    I suggest you to try miniSipServer. It is a SIP server for windows and
    very easy to use.

    MSS can support powerful dialing plan, so I believe it is very easy to
    check call with caller ID for MSS.

    But MSS cannot support VoiceMail in current versin.

    B.R.
    Hongtian
     
    Hongtian, May 22, 2007
    #6
  7. John McKenzie

    Hongtian Guest

    Re: Setting up a home IVR

    On May 16, 2:57 pm, John McKenzie <> wrote:
    > Greetings, all.
    >
    > I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
    > here seeking guidiance.
    >
    > If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
    > and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
    >
    > What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
    > and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    > by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    > numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    > computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    > recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    > voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)
    >
    > My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
    > I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
    > however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    > it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    > and what type of hardware would I need for this.
    >
    > I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
    > is out there.
    >
    > Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
    >
    > Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    > http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
    >
    > It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    > I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
    > like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
    >
    > Thanks


    I suggest you to try miniSipServer. It is a SIP server for windows and
    very easy to use.

    MSS can support powerful dialing plan, so I believe it is very easy to
    check call with caller ID for MSS.

    But MSS cannot support VoiceMail in current versin.

    B.R.
    Hongtian
     
    Hongtian, May 22, 2007
    #7
  8. Balwinder:

    Thanks for the follow-up reply. I am still unclear on what a good course
    of action would be as my reasons for looking at the Grandstream device
    were the exact same as your reasons for me not to use it. I was hoping I
    could ask some clarifiying questions of you and everyone else reading this.

    As I have a machine I intend to run as a Linux based phone system thing I
    figured I just need something that will allow the computer to control a
    phone line. A voice modem without the modem part. :) I know that a fancy
    PCI card with a FXO and a FXS port could do what I need, but it is more
    expensive than the Grandtsream device and I do not require an impressive
    production system in a critical environment. The Grandstream device may do
    less, but it should be enough and is cheaper. Quality can come latter when
    the situiation is not as experimental as it is now.

    If the Grandstream device cannot allow my computer to accept and/or
    place phone calls over the PSTN, what are devices like it used for?

    To further my VoIP education could you please tell me what the
    CLI in the "requisite CLI information" comment you made stands for and a
    little bit about the concept?

    (Perhaps one of my problems is that I do not understand the limits of an
    Analogue Telephone Adaptor.)

    I appreciate your help and certainly look forward to learning more about
    the wacky world of VoIP from you and everyone else willing to teach me.

    B.R.:

    Thanks for replying to my post as well. I already have a number of
    software options to look at and now I have one more, although a linux one
    is preferred. Still, I am going out to look up info on MiniSIPerver right
    now. My immeadiate problem is learning what hardware will be required for
    me to do what I intend.
     
    John McKenzie, May 28, 2007
    #8
  9. Did a little more reading...

    CLI is the same as ANI? If the Grandstream device can't read that, no
    caller ID for me. I understand a little more now if this is true.
     
    John McKenzie, May 28, 2007
    #9
  10. John McKenzie <> writes:
    > If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
    > and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.


    That's what I do. (Asterisk, Sipura-3000, Grandstream bt-100 phones.)

    > Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    > http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html


    That looks to be much the same as the Sipura 3k I have. It should
    work.

    Note, learning the weird Asterisk regexp language will remind you of
    learning Sendmail's "cf" language. Programming in it will make your
    head hurt. Expect it not to make any sense for a week or two and then
    it will click. The other sip servers you mentioned might be better.
    I have no experience with them so can't say for sure.

    > It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    > I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
    > like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.


    The one thing that you probably won't be able to do is talk over he
    POTS line using this device. 2-wire POTS lines have much too much
    echo. (Without VOIP's added delay your ear will take out echo all on
    it's own, so you aren't bothered by it. Once you add a hundred
    milliseconds or two VOIP delay your ear won't filter it any more and
    the result is hearing yourself talk just delayed enough to make it
    impossible to continue.) This is why I ended up using my Sipura 3k as
    an IVR-based answering machine only.

    -wolfgang
    --
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/
    Hints for IPv6 on FC6 http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/fedora/ipv6-tunnel.html
     
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht, May 28, 2007
    #10
  11. John McKenzie <> writes:
    > CLI is the same as ANI? If the Grandstream device can't read that, no
    > caller ID for me. I understand a little more now if this is true.


    No. There are subtle differences between ANI and CLI. CLI is the
    consumer caller ID. That is the only choice you have for a POTS line.

    ANI is the telephone system's internal billing or trunk line number
    associated with the outgoing line. For offices with trunk lines to
    the central office the ANI will usually be some trunk line instead of
    the calling party's desk phone's number. In general it is less useful
    for calling the person back on. The one advantage to ANI is that is
    isn't subject to the caller-id masking that allows phone spammers to
    hide their phone number behind a PRIVATE flag.

    -wolfgang
    --
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/
    Hints for IPv6 on FC6 http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/fedora/ipv6-tunnel.html
     
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht, May 28, 2007
    #11
  12. Re: Setting up a home IVR

    On May 16, 10:14 am, "Balwinder S \"bsd\" Dheeman"
    <> wrote:
    > On 05/16/2007 12:27 PM, John McKenzie wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Greetings, all.

    >
    > > I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
    > > here seeking guidiance.

    >
    > > If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
    > > and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.

    >
    > > What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
    > > and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    > > by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    > > numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    > > computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    > > recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    > > voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)

    >
    > > My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
    > > I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
    > > however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    > > it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    > > and what type of hardware would I need for this.

    >
    > > I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
    > > is out there.

    >
    > > Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?

    >
    > > Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    > > http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html

    >
    > > It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    > > I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
    > > like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.

    >
    > IMHO, the Asterisk running on a Linux machine is a best option to meet
    > all your current and, or future needs and, or requirements. Instead of
    > an ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter), try finding a suitable card with one
    > FXS and one FXO ports.
    >
    > --
    > Dr Balwinder S "bsd" Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
    > Anu'z Linux@HOME Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
    > Chandigarh, UT, 160062, India Gentoo, Fedora, Debian/FreeBSD/XP
    > Home:http://cto.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit:http://counter.li.org/- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Don't waste your time on Asterisk. It's too difficult for the average
    user. Check out http://www.callbutler.com.
     
    Alphamacaroon, May 29, 2007
    #12
  13. John McKenzie

    LVMarc Guest

    Re: pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters wasRe: Settingup a home IVR

    LVMarc wrote:
    > John McKenzie wrote:
    >
    >> Greetings, all.
    >>
    >> I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
    >> here seeking guidiance.
    >>
    >> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my
    >> computer
    >> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID
    >> info.
    >>
    >> What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
    >> and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    >> by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    >> numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    >> computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    >> recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    >> voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)
    >>
    >> My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is
    >> possible.
    >> I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
    >> however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    >> it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    >> and what type of hardware would I need for this.
    >>
    >> I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
    >> is out there.
    >>
    >> Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
    >>
    >> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    >> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
    >>
    >>
    >> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
    >> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run
    >> something
    >> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > you can connect your pstn and voip using combine-a-line.
    >
    > and it does not need a usb port and coptuer to operate savings 100's
    > dollars in wasted energy use.
    >
    > here is a link to combine a line
    >
    > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...:IT&viewitem=&item=300111295431&rd=1&rd=1voip
    > pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters
    > here an important consideration when implementing a voip and pstn

    servcie and back-up planning!
    >
    > Users of VOIP may want to consider back-up provisions to their

    service. A user guide suggest what can go wrong and how to have a
    back=up plan and lifeline in cases of VOIP in-operation.
    >
    > link to guide
    >
    >

    http://reviews.ebay.com/Considerati...-Service-with-VOIP_W0QQugidZ10000000003684514
    >
    > Marco


    > A review suggests how much power is used here.............
    >
    >

    http://reviews.ebay.com/Billions-en...wered-VOIP-adapter_W0QQugidZ10000000003599864
    >
    >
    > A non usb pstn voip pstn adapter is located here
    >
    >

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...MESE:IT&viewitem=&item=300111295431&rd=1&rd=1
    >
    > a video of the operation of the Combine-a-line- (non usb) adapter is

    here....
    >
    > View here and now.....http://www.youtube.com/v/R0aGKJQc7rc
    >
    >
    > Thanks for viewing
    >
    > Marc


    www.fwt.niat.net
    http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=LVMarc
     
    LVMarc, Aug 7, 2007
    #13
  14. John McKenzie

    LVMarc Guest

    Re: pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters wasRe: Settingup a home IVR

    LVMarc wrote:
    > LVMarc wrote:
    >
    >> John McKenzie wrote:
    >>
    >>> Greetings, all.
    >>>
    >>> I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I
    >>> come
    >>> here seeking guidiance.
    >>>
    >>> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my
    >>> computer
    >>> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID
    >>> info.
    >>>
    >>> What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my
    >>> wall
    >>> and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
    >>> by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    >>> numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    >>> computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
    >>> recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
    >>> voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)
    >>>
    >>> My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is
    >>> possible.
    >>> I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this
    >>> purpose,
    >>> however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    >>> it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    >>> and what type of hardware would I need for this.
    >>>
    >>> I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about
    >>> what
    >>> is out there.
    >>>
    >>> Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
    >>>
    >>> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    >>> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was
    >>> hoping
    >>> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run
    >>> something
    >>> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >>
    >> you can connect your pstn and voip using combine-a-line.
    >>
    >> and it does not need a usb port and coptuer to operate savings 100's
    >> dollars in wasted energy use.
    >>
    >> here is a link to combine a line
    >>
    >> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...:IT&viewitem=&item=300111295431&rd=1&rd=1voip
    >> pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters

    >
    > > here an important consideration when implementing a voip and pstn

    > servcie and back-up planning!
    > >
    > > Users of VOIP may want to consider back-up provisions to their

    > service. A user guide suggest what can go wrong and how to have a
    > back=up plan and lifeline in cases of VOIP in-operation.
    > >
    > > link to guide
    > >
    > >

    > http://reviews.ebay.com/Considerati...-Service-with-VOIP_W0QQugidZ10000000003684514
    >
    > >
    > > Marco

    >
    > > A review suggests how much power is used here.............
    > >
    > >

    > http://reviews.ebay.com/Billions-en...wered-VOIP-adapter_W0QQugidZ10000000003599864
    >
    > >
    > >
    > > A non usb pstn voip pstn adapter is located here
    > >
    > >

    > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...MESE:IT&viewitem=&item=300111295431&rd=1&rd=1
    >
    > >
    > > a video of the operation of the Combine-a-line- (non usb) adapter is

    > here....
    > >
    > > View here and now.....http://www.youtube.com/v/R0aGKJQc7rc
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks for viewing
    > >
    > > Marc

    >
    > www.fwt.niat.net
    > http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=LVMarc
     
    LVMarc, Oct 21, 2007
    #14
  15. John McKenzie

    LVMarc Guest

    Re: pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters wasRe: Settingup a home IVR

    LVMarc wrote:
    > LVMarc wrote:
    >
    >> LVMarc wrote:
    >>
    >>> John McKenzie wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Greetings, all.
    >>>>
    >>>> I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I
    >>>> come
    >>>> here seeking guidiance.
    >>>>
    >>>> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my
    >>>> computer
    >>>> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call
    >>>> ID info.
    >>>>
    >>>> What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my
    >>>> wall
    >>>> and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer
    >>>> (pressumably
    >>>> by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
    >>>> numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
    >>>> computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it
    >>>> plays a
    >>>> recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording
    >>>> the
    >>>> voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary. :)
    >>>>
    >>>> My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is
    >>>> possible.
    >>>> I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this
    >>>> purpose,
    >>>> however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
    >>>> it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
    >>>> and what type of hardware would I need for this.
    >>>>
    >>>> I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about
    >>>> what
    >>>> is out there.
    >>>>
    >>>> Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
    >>>>
    >>>> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
    >>>> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was
    >>>> hoping
    >>>> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run
    >>>> something
    >>>> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> you can connect your pstn and voip using combine-a-line.
    >>>
    >>> and it does not need a usb port and coptuer to operate savings 100's
    >>> dollars in wasted energy use.
    >>>
    >>> here is a link to combine a line
    >>>
    >>> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...:IT&viewitem=&item=300111295431&rd=1&rd=1voip
    >>> pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters

    >>
    >>
    >> > here an important consideration when implementing a voip and pstn

    >> servcie and back-up planning!
    >> >
    >> > Users of VOIP may want to consider back-up provisions to their

    >> service. A user guide suggest what can go wrong and how to have a
    >> back=up plan and lifeline in cases of VOIP in-operation.
    >> >
    >> > link to guide
    >> >
    >> >

    >> http://reviews.ebay.com/Considerati...-Service-with-VOIP_W0QQugidZ10000000003684514
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Marco

    >>
    >> > A review suggests how much power is used here.............
    >> >
    >> >

    >> http://reviews.ebay.com/Billions-en...wered-VOIP-adapter_W0QQugidZ10000000003599864
    >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > A non usb pstn voip pstn adapter is located here
    >> >
    >> >

    >> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...MESE:IT&viewitem=&item=300111295431&rd=1&rd=1
    >>
    >> >
    >> > a video of the operation of the Combine-a-line- (non usb) adapter

    >> is here....
    >> >
    >> > View here and now.....http://www.youtube.com/v/R0aGKJQc7rc
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Thanks for viewing
    >> >
    >> > Marc

    >>
    >> www.fwt.niat.net
    >> http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=LVMarc
     
    LVMarc, Oct 21, 2007
    #15
    1. Advertising

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