Serious laptop repairs - help needed

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Ray Greene, Jul 21, 2007.

  1. Ray Greene

    Ray Greene Guest

    I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    fan and heatsink.

    I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.

    The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
    and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
    standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.

    Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?

    Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/

    --
    Ray Greene
     
    Ray Greene, Jul 21, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Ray Greene

    SteveM Guest

    Ray Greene <> wrote in
    news::

    > I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    > motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    > some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    > fan and heatsink.
    >
    > I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    > I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >
    > The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
    > and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
    > standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >
    > Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
    >
    > Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    > manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    > http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >


    Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
    soldering
    unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
    on Acer notebook motherboards.

    Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
    Next
    or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.

    SteveM
     
    SteveM, Jul 22, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ray Greene

    Ray Greene Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <>
    wrote:

    >Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >> fan and heatsink.
    >>
    >> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    >> I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>
    >> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
    >> and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
    >> standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>
    >> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
    >>
    >> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >>

    >
    >Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
    >soldering
    >unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
    >on Acer notebook motherboards.
    >
    >Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
    >Next
    >or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.


    Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
    though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
    job like this?

    --
    Ray Greene
     
    Ray Greene, Jul 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Ray Greene

    big cat Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene <> wrote:

    >I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >fan and heatsink.
    >
    >I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    >I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >
    >The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
    >and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
    >standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >
    >Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
    >
    >Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/



    No Dump it and get a Real brand Lap Top..
     
    big cat, Jul 22, 2007
    #4
  5. Ray Greene

    Gordon Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene wrote:

    > I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    > I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.


    Yes! Posting of the month, the year is fast following the decade.
     
    Gordon, Jul 22, 2007
    #5
  6. On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 16:41:01 +1200, big cat <> wrote in
    <news:>:

    > On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene <> wrote:
    >
    >>I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>fan and heatsink.
    >>
    >>I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    >>I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>
    >>The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
    >>and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
    >>standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>
    >>Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
    >>
    >>Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/

    >
    > No Dump it and get a Real brand Lap Top..


    Looks like Sheppard's changed his underwear and his nym again... big pussy
    would be far more appropriate than big cat.

    Meow!
     
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Jul 22, 2007
    #6
  7. Ray Greene

    SteveM Guest

    Ray Greene <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >>news::
    >>
    >>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>> fan and heatsink.
    >>>
    >>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
    >>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>>
    >>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
    >>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
    >>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>>
    >>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
    >>> use?
    >>>
    >>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >>>

    >>
    >>Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
    >>soldering
    >>unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
    >>on Acer notebook motherboards.
    >>
    >>Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
    >>Next
    >>or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.

    >
    > Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
    > though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
    > job like this?
    >


    Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
    to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
    the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
    specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
    a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
    standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
    potential damage.

    (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
    board while you're at it though!)

    SteveM
     
    SteveM, Jul 22, 2007
    #7
  8. SteveM wrote:
    > Ray Greene <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >>> news::
    >>>
    >>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>>> fan and heatsink.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
    >>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>>>
    >>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
    >>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
    >>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>>>
    >>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
    >>>> use?
    >>>>
    >>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >>>>
    >>> Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
    >>> soldering
    >>> unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
    >>> on Acer notebook motherboards.
    >>>
    >>> Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
    >>> Next
    >>> or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.

    >> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
    >> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
    >> job like this?
    >>

    >
    > Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
    > to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
    > the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
    > specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
    > a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
    > standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
    > potential damage.
    >
    > (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
    > board while you're at it though!)


    I take issue with this.

    Hot air soldering is more likely to damage the pcb and surrounding components
    than using a well sized conventional soldering iron when reattaching standoffs.

    You have to wait a long time for the hot air to heat the standoff up to
    soldering temperature, meanwhile the hot air is heating up the resin of the pcb
    and damaging it and damaging the solder joints of surrounding components.

    For a successful repair ensure that you remove as much as possible of the old
    solder before resoldering the joint.

    Adhesives are a poor solution.
     
    Mark Robinson, Jul 23, 2007
    #8
  9. Ray Greene

    Rob S Guest

    Mark Robinson wrote:
    > SteveM wrote:
    >> Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >> news::
    >>> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >>>> news::
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>>>> fan and heatsink.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
    >>>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
    >>>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
    >>>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
    >>>>> use?
    >>>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >>>>>
    >>>> Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
    >>>> soldering
    >>>> unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
    >>>> on Acer notebook motherboards.
    >>>>
    >>>> Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco
    >>>> or Next
    >>>> or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.
    >>> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
    >>> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
    >>> job like this?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
    >> to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
    >> the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
    >> specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
    >> a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
    >> standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
    >> potential damage.
    >> (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
    >> board while you're at it though!)

    >
    > I take issue with this.
    >
    > Hot air soldering is more likely to damage the pcb and surrounding
    > components than using a well sized conventional soldering iron when
    > reattaching standoffs.
    >
    > You have to wait a long time for the hot air to heat the standoff up to
    > soldering temperature, meanwhile the hot air is heating up the resin of
    > the pcb and damaging it and damaging the solder joints of surrounding
    > components.
    >
    > For a successful repair ensure that you remove as much as possible of
    > the old solder before resoldering the joint.
    >
    > Adhesives are a poor solution.


    Why are adhesives a bad idea? There is no need for a good electrical
    connection, just a good mechanical fix. As long as the standoff is
    fitted in the correct place and not tilted or bent in any direction, a 2
    part resin should do the job nicely. Any heat from the motherboard only
    helps to cure the resin, resulting in a stronger joint.

    --

    Rob
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    http://aspir8or.blogspot.com
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


    Code so clean you could eat off it
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
     
    Rob S, Jul 23, 2007
    #9
  10. Rob S wrote:
    > Mark Robinson wrote:
    >> SteveM wrote:
    >>> Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >>> news::
    >>>> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >>>>> news::
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>>>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>>>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>>>>> fan and heatsink.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
    >>>>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
    >>>>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
    >>>>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
    >>>>>> use?
    >>>>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>>>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>>>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
    >>>>> soldering
    >>>>> unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
    >>>>> on Acer notebook motherboards.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco
    >>>>> or Next
    >>>>> or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.
    >>>> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
    >>>> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
    >>>> job like this?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
    >>> to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
    >>> the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
    >>> specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
    >>> a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
    >>> standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
    >>> potential damage.
    >>> (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
    >>> board while you're at it though!)

    >>
    >> I take issue with this.
    >>
    >> Hot air soldering is more likely to damage the pcb and surrounding
    >> components than using a well sized conventional soldering iron when
    >> reattaching standoffs.
    >>
    >> You have to wait a long time for the hot air to heat the standoff up
    >> to soldering temperature, meanwhile the hot air is heating up the
    >> resin of the pcb and damaging it and damaging the solder joints of
    >> surrounding components.
    >>
    >> For a successful repair ensure that you remove as much as possible of
    >> the old solder before resoldering the joint.
    >>
    >> Adhesives are a poor solution.

    >
    > Why are adhesives a bad idea? There is no need for a good electrical
    > connection, just a good mechanical fix. As long as the standoff is
    > fitted in the correct place and not tilted or bent in any direction, a 2
    > part resin should do the job nicely. Any heat from the motherboard only
    > helps to cure the resin, resulting in a stronger joint.


    Heat while the curing is in process helps strengthen the joint. After that it
    weakens it. My experience is that solder is stronger than araldite.

    It's important that the fan assembly is well earthed or static buildup can zap
    the processor/motherboard. Toshiba 1800s are badly prone to this.
     
    Mark Robinson, Jul 23, 2007
    #10
  11. Ray Greene

    Ray Greene Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jul 2007 12:38:52 +1200, Mark Robinson
    <2tod.net> wrote:

    >Rob S wrote:
    >> Mark Robinson wrote:
    >>> SteveM wrote:
    >>>> Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >>>> news::
    >>>>> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <>
    >>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Ray Greene <> wrote in
    >>>>>> news::
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>>>>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>>>>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>>>>>> fan and heatsink.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
    >>>>>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
    >>>>>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
    >>>>>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
    >>>>>>> use?
    >>>>>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>>>>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>>>>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
    >>>>>> soldering
    >>>>>> unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
    >>>>>> on Acer notebook motherboards.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco
    >>>>>> or Next
    >>>>>> or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.
    >>>>> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
    >>>>> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
    >>>>> job like this?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
    >>>> to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
    >>>> the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
    >>>> specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
    >>>> a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
    >>>> standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
    >>>> potential damage.
    >>>> (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
    >>>> board while you're at it though!)
    >>>
    >>> I take issue with this.
    >>>
    >>> Hot air soldering is more likely to damage the pcb and surrounding
    >>> components than using a well sized conventional soldering iron when
    >>> reattaching standoffs.
    >>>
    >>> You have to wait a long time for the hot air to heat the standoff up
    >>> to soldering temperature, meanwhile the hot air is heating up the
    >>> resin of the pcb and damaging it and damaging the solder joints of
    >>> surrounding components.
    >>>
    >>> For a successful repair ensure that you remove as much as possible of
    >>> the old solder before resoldering the joint.
    >>>
    >>> Adhesives are a poor solution.

    >>
    >> Why are adhesives a bad idea? There is no need for a good electrical
    >> connection, just a good mechanical fix. As long as the standoff is
    >> fitted in the correct place and not tilted or bent in any direction, a 2
    >> part resin should do the job nicely. Any heat from the motherboard only
    >> helps to cure the resin, resulting in a stronger joint.

    >
    >Heat while the curing is in process helps strengthen the joint. After that it
    >weakens it. My experience is that solder is stronger than araldite.
    >
    >It's important that the fan assembly is well earthed or static buildup can zap
    >the processor/motherboard. Toshiba 1800s are badly prone to this.


    I wasn't thinking of epoxy but rather an anaerobic adhesive. In the
    right conditions Loctite can provide immense strength but I suspect
    that in this case there wouldn't be a big enough surface area. I could
    be wrong though.

    In the end though I applied my favourite engineering principle - 'what
    could possibly go wrong?' - and got out my most ancient electric
    soldering iron (the one with the nice wooden handle and 3/4" dia tip
    that I use for small plumbing jobs) and soldered the standoffs on with
    it.

    I tinned the ends first and they soldered on beautifully and quite
    quickly. There were no vulnerable components close enough to be
    damaged and not enough loose solder on the iron to drip onto the
    motherboard so it looked safe enough. I was quite relieved to see it
    boot up afterwards though :)

    Thanks for all the advice everyone, it was all very informative.

    --
    Ray Greene
     
    Ray Greene, Jul 23, 2007
    #11
  12. Ray Greene

    Yeah Right Guest

    On , , Sun, 22 Jul 2007 17:50:25 +1200, Re: Serious laptop
    repairs - help needed, Nicolaas Hawkins <>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 16:41:01 +1200, big cat <> wrote in
    ><news:>:
    >
    >> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>>motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>>some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>>fan and heatsink.
    >>>
    >>>I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    >>>I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>>
    >>>The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
    >>>and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
    >>>standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>>
    >>>Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
    >>>
    >>>Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>>manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>>http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/

    >>
    >> No Dump it and get a Real brand Lap Top..

    >
    >Looks like Sheppard's changed his underwear and his nym again...


    Big Cat is an old nym, it was already in my kill filter and
    recognised Roger once again.
     
    Yeah Right, Jul 23, 2007
    #12
  13. On Mon, 23 Jul 2007 19:16:59 +1200, Yeah Right
    <> wrote in
    <news:>:

    > On , , Sun, 22 Jul 2007 17:50:25 +1200, Re: Serious laptop
    > repairs - help needed, Nicolaas Hawkins <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 16:41:01 +1200, big cat <> wrote in
    >><news:>:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
    >>>>motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
    >>>>some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
    >>>>fan and heatsink.
    >>>>
    >>>>I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
    >>>>I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
    >>>>
    >>>>The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
    >>>>and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
    >>>>standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
    >>>>
    >>>>Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
    >>>>
    >>>>Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
    >>>>manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
    >>>>http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/category/laptop-service-manual/
    >>>
    >>> No Dump it and get a Real brand Lap Top..

    >>
    >>Looks like Sheppard's changed his underwear and his nym again...

    >
    > Big Cat is an old nym, it was already in my kill filter and
    > recognised Roger once again.


    Recycling. Imagination must be wearing uit. Little Pussy. Meow.

    --
    Nicolaas.

    2007 Pricelessware CD now available. 600Mb of the best of the best in
    Freeware. E-Mail me for details.


    .... I love mankind. It's the people I can't stand.
     
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Jul 23, 2007
    #13
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