Sensitivity

Discussion in 'MCAD' started by Jackie, Apr 28, 2004.

  1. Jackie

    Jackie Guest

    Being that we are all working towards a professional
    certification, I will assume that we are all intelligent,
    upstanding people. There are people here who are from
    countries around the world and some of these other
    professionals are not native speakers or writers of the
    English language. English is very difficult to learn
    because of the intricacies of the language and some
    languages just don't translate literally. Let's show our
    sensitivities and respect for others, as professional as
    we are, by not nitpicking these posts for proper English.
    It doesn't take long to realize that when someone writes
    he is going to 'give' an exam, we know he means 'take'
    or 'sit for' the exam. I'm sure they are doing the best
    they can to be clear to us.

    Jackie, MCAD for Microsoft .NET
     
    Jackie, Apr 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jackie

    Mike Guest

    Couldn't agree more.

    When chastising someone for using 'write' when they
    mean 'take' just makes you look like the stupid fool you
    are. Anyone with half a brain can figure out what they
    mean.

    -Mike
    >-----Original Message-----
    >Being that we are all working towards a professional
    >certification, I will assume that we are all intelligent,
    >upstanding people. There are people here who are from
    >countries around the world and some of these other
    >professionals are not native speakers or writers of the
    >English language. English is very difficult to learn
    >because of the intricacies of the language and some
    >languages just don't translate literally. Let's show our
    >sensitivities and respect for others, as professional as
    >we are, by not nitpicking these posts for proper English.
    >It doesn't take long to realize that when someone writes
    >he is going to 'give' an exam, we know he means 'take'
    >or 'sit for' the exam. I'm sure they are doing the best
    >they can to be clear to us.
    >
    >Jackie, MCAD for Microsoft .NET
    >.
    >
     
    Mike, Apr 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jackie

    DalePres Guest

    "Write" vs "take" is not an issue of language; it's an issue of grammar.
    Many native English speakers say they are going to "write" an exam or say
    that they completed the "paper." Microsoft writes exams. We take them.
    They're all done on the computer. There is no paper other than the score
    sheet at the end.

    My comment was not motivated by the nationality of the person who said he
    (or she) was going to write an exam. I do not have any way of knowing who
    that person is or what his or her nationality is.

    You folks could take a lesson from your own book. Don't take yourselves or
    all of this too seriously.

    By the way. Sitting for the exam is assumed and doesn't have to be stated.
    As far as I am aware, unless there's an ADA issue involved, standing for a
    certification exam is not allowed.

    Dale

    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:558d01c42d26$ddb8a7d0$...
    > Couldn't agree more.
    >
    > When chastising someone for using 'write' when they
    > mean 'take' just makes you look like the stupid fool you
    > are. Anyone with half a brain can figure out what they
    > mean.
    >
    > -Mike
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >Being that we are all working towards a professional
    > >certification, I will assume that we are all intelligent,
    > >upstanding people. There are people here who are from
    > >countries around the world and some of these other
    > >professionals are not native speakers or writers of the
    > >English language. English is very difficult to learn
    > >because of the intricacies of the language and some
    > >languages just don't translate literally. Let's show our
    > >sensitivities and respect for others, as professional as
    > >we are, by not nitpicking these posts for proper English.
    > >It doesn't take long to realize that when someone writes
    > >he is going to 'give' an exam, we know he means 'take'
    > >or 'sit for' the exam. I'm sure they are doing the best
    > >they can to be clear to us.
    > >
    > >Jackie, MCAD for Microsoft .NET
    > >.
    > >
     
    DalePres, Apr 30, 2004
    #3
  4. Jackie

    Jackie Guest

    Dale,
    why is it that you can write such a long response to us,
    yet you wrote such a flippant response to someone who you
    obviously understood? Why not just respond to the stated
    question, instead of trying to belittle the person who in
    your opinion, used improper grammer? You seem to have
    understood what he meant.

    About 'sit for' an exam. Dale, that is a well-known term
    used to mean 'take an exam'. Do a quick internet search
    on 'sit for' 'exam'. You'll see it everywhere. Sure it
    does not need to be stated that one will literally 'sit'
    for this exam. In fact, not all exams involves one sitting
    for the entire time. Really. You are not required to sit
    down for a ms exam. You can kneel down if you want to and
    you can stand up too. Hell you can use a combination of
    them all, but figuratively speaking you are still sitting
    for the exam, i.e. taking the darn thing.

    Jackie, MCAD for Microsoft .NET
    >-----Original Message-----
    >"Write" vs "take" is not an issue of language; it's an

    issue of grammar.
    >Many native English speakers say they are going

    to "write" an exam or say
    >that they completed the "paper." Microsoft writes

    exams. We take them.
    >They're all done on the computer. There is no paper

    other than the score
    >sheet at the end.
    >
    >My comment was not motivated by the nationality of the

    person who said he
    >(or she) was going to write an exam. I do not have any

    way of knowing who
    >that person is or what his or her nationality is.
    >
    >You folks could take a lesson from your own book. Don't

    take yourselves or
    >all of this too seriously.
    >
    >By the way. Sitting for the exam is assumed and doesn't

    have to be stated.
    >As far as I am aware, unless there's an ADA issue

    involved, standing for a
    >certification exam is not allowed.
    >
    >Dale
    >
    >"Mike" <> wrote in

    message
    >news:558d01c42d26$ddb8a7d0$...
    >> Couldn't agree more.
    >>
    >> When chastising someone for using 'write' when they
    >> mean 'take' just makes you look like the stupid fool you
    >> are. Anyone with half a brain can figure out what they
    >> mean.
    >>
    >> -Mike
    >> >-----Original Message-----
    >> >Being that we are all working towards a professional
    >> >certification, I will assume that we are all

    intelligent,
    >> >upstanding people. There are people here who are from
    >> >countries around the world and some of these other
    >> >professionals are not native speakers or writers of the
    >> >English language. English is very difficult to learn
    >> >because of the intricacies of the language and some
    >> >languages just don't translate literally. Let's show

    our
    >> >sensitivities and respect for others, as professional

    as
    >> >we are, by not nitpicking these posts for proper

    English.
    >> >It doesn't take long to realize that when someone

    writes
    >> >he is going to 'give' an exam, we know he means 'take'
    >> >or 'sit for' the exam. I'm sure they are doing the best
    >> >they can to be clear to us.
    >> >
    >> >Jackie, MCAD for Microsoft .NET
    >> >.
    >> >

    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Jackie, Apr 30, 2004
    #4
  5. Jackie

    DalePres Guest

    I'm sure you meant grammar and not grammer; correct?

    Dale

    "Jackie" <> wrote in message
    news:689001c42ec2$80b8e2f0$...
    > Dale,
    > why is it that you can write such a long response to us,
    > yet you wrote such a flippant response to someone who you
    > obviously understood? Why not just respond to the stated
    > question, instead of trying to belittle the person who in
    > your opinion, used improper grammer? You seem to have
    > understood what he meant.
    >
    > About 'sit for' an exam. Dale, that is a well-known term
    > used to mean 'take an exam'. Do a quick internet search
    > on 'sit for' 'exam'. You'll see it everywhere. Sure it
    > does not need to be stated that one will literally 'sit'
    > for this exam. In fact, not all exams involves one sitting
    > for the entire time. Really. You are not required to sit
    > down for a ms exam. You can kneel down if you want to and
    > you can stand up too. Hell you can use a combination of
    > them all, but figuratively speaking you are still sitting
    > for the exam, i.e. taking the darn thing.
    >
    > Jackie, MCAD for Microsoft .NET
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >"Write" vs "take" is not an issue of language; it's an

    > issue of grammar.
    > >Many native English speakers say they are going

    > to "write" an exam or say
    > >that they completed the "paper." Microsoft writes

    > exams. We take them.
    > >They're all done on the computer. There is no paper

    > other than the score
    > >sheet at the end.
    > >
    > >My comment was not motivated by the nationality of the

    > person who said he
    > >(or she) was going to write an exam. I do not have any

    > way of knowing who
    > >that person is or what his or her nationality is.
    > >
    > >You folks could take a lesson from your own book. Don't

    > take yourselves or
    > >all of this too seriously.
    > >
    > >By the way. Sitting for the exam is assumed and doesn't

    > have to be stated.
    > >As far as I am aware, unless there's an ADA issue

    > involved, standing for a
    > >certification exam is not allowed.
    > >
    > >Dale
    > >
    > >"Mike" <> wrote in

    > message
    > >news:558d01c42d26$ddb8a7d0$...
    > >> Couldn't agree more.
    > >>
    > >> When chastising someone for using 'write' when they
    > >> mean 'take' just makes you look like the stupid fool you
    > >> are. Anyone with half a brain can figure out what they
    > >> mean.
    > >>
    > >> -Mike
    > >> >-----Original Message-----
    > >> >Being that we are all working towards a professional
    > >> >certification, I will assume that we are all

    > intelligent,
    > >> >upstanding people. There are people here who are from
    > >> >countries around the world and some of these other
    > >> >professionals are not native speakers or writers of the
    > >> >English language. English is very difficult to learn
    > >> >because of the intricacies of the language and some
    > >> >languages just don't translate literally. Let's show

    > our
    > >> >sensitivities and respect for others, as professional

    > as
    > >> >we are, by not nitpicking these posts for proper

    > English.
    > >> >It doesn't take long to realize that when someone

    > writes
    > >> >he is going to 'give' an exam, we know he means 'take'
    > >> >or 'sit for' the exam. I'm sure they are doing the best
    > >> >they can to be clear to us.
    > >> >
    > >> >Jackie, MCAD for Microsoft .NET
    > >> >.
    > >> >

    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
     
    DalePres, May 2, 2004
    #5
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