Semi-OT: Tuesday Tools

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by Briscobar, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Briscobar

    Briscobar Guest

    http://kgbarchiver.sourceforge.net/

    WinZip not cutting it anymore? WinRAR not compressing enough? Try this.

    Can compress a 430MB MS Office ISO down to 1.4MB....small enough to fit on a
    floppy. Of course, it comes with higher hardware requirements, but they
    don't look terribly hard to meet. Especially for the technically inclined,
    who have better machines than the regular internet scum.

    Have not tried it myself, but fully intend to mess around with it.

    --
    KB

    MCNGP #26
    www.mcngp.com claims to have seen the Loch Ness monster on several
    occasions.
     
    Briscobar, Mar 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. Briscobar

    kpg Guest

    As Briscobar once said in microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse

    > http://kgbarchiver.sourceforge.net/


    Interesting.

    You know, information theory has given us a theoretical limit to how
    much compression you can do. I played around with Huffman coding
    and it was quite fascinating, to get the most compression, the trick
    is to break the input into parts that can be compressed near the
    optimal level. WinZip using a 4k sliding window to do this, but if
    you take the time to analyze the file completely you should be able
    to achieve very good compression. I worte a decent one in QuickBasic
    a long time ago - very, very slow but fun.
     
    kpg, Mar 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. Briscobar

    Jtyc Guest

    What's the big deal? I don't need the space.


    I use Stacker.
     
    Jtyc, Mar 28, 2006
    #3
  4. Briscobar

    kpg Guest

    As Jtyc once said in microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse

    > # Name resolution details: file://c:\temp\193810.htm (3/28/2006
    > 4:47:43 PM) # What's the big deal? I don't need the space.
    >
    >
    > I use Stacker.
    >
    >
    >


    I love(ed) stacker!
     
    kpg, Mar 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Briscobar

    kpg Guest

    It really quite clever.

    Assume you have an ASCII file, count the occurrence of
    each character in the file and you end up with a table
    showing, for example, you have 217 'e's , 119 'a's and
    so on, from most to least. The character that occurs
    the most is represented with a binary 01. That takes
    up only 2 bits instead of the 8 bits normally occupied
    by an 'e". The next most frequent character you represent
    with a 011, and so on. You need the leading 0 because
    we are throwing away the 8 bit boundary that normally
    allows us to understand a file, we need to be able to
    tell where one character ends and another starts when its
    time to uncompress. So all characters start with a 0 and
    contain no zeros internally. After the eighth character
    the coding starts taking up more room than the original
    eight bits, but that's ok, because there are fewer of them,
    also, the sequence of ones can be encoded with a count
    instead of the actual ones themselves. Now this type of
    compression works best when there are a small number of
    repeated characters and they are repeated many times, like
    in a text document. When the file is binary, like an exe,
    there is a more random distribution of characters, ranging
    from 0 to 255,. In that case the file is sectioned off, in
    say 4k blocks, so that locally there is a lot of repeated
    characters, perhaps long stings of nulls where buffers will
    reside. Anyway, there are many tricks to optimize the
    compression at the expense of time spent analyzing the file.

    I'll stop here because I see you nodding off, and I think
    I've sufficiently demonstrated that I'm smarter than you.
     
    kpg, Mar 28, 2006
    #5
  6. Briscobar

    Jtyc Guest

    Yeah... I don't speak freaky deaky Dutch.
     
    Jtyc, Mar 29, 2006
    #6
  7. Maan.. Who cares anymore about that zip/rarr crap?
    The world of GB and GHz can hold the entire enterprise in a single hard
    drive. And if you not awake yet, checkout the iPods in stores near you.
    It’s the size of a credit card. and you can download to it up to 60GB of
    mcngp crap if you wish



    "Briscobar" wrote:

    > http://kgbarchiver.sourceforge.net/
    >
    > WinZip not cutting it anymore? WinRAR not compressing enough? Try this.
    >
    > Can compress a 430MB MS Office ISO down to 1.4MB....small enough to fit on a
    > floppy. Of course, it comes with higher hardware requirements, but they
    > don't look terribly hard to meet. Especially for the technically inclined,
    > who have better machines than the regular internet scum.
    >
    > Have not tried it myself, but fully intend to mess around with it.
    >
    > --
    > KB
    >
    > MCNGP #26
    > www.mcngp.com claims to have seen the Loch Ness monster on several
    > occasions.
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QnJlYWQtdGVhc2Vy?=, Mar 29, 2006
    #7
  8. Briscobar

    LRM Guest

    All gawked in amazement when: Bread-teaser assaulted us with:
    <snipped out the uninteresting bits>
    > if you wish
    >
    >
    >

    Ah ha! So you're the wish granter.
    I wish you'd get a real news reader.
    --
    LRM
    MCNGP 7^2
    www.mcngp.com home of the bogosity singularity.
     
    LRM, Mar 29, 2006
    #8
  9. Why would I want real news reader?
    I can read your brains without having to downloading it.

    --
    Bread teaser
    The mans rule in life is to think, eat sh$t and sleep


    "LRM" wrote:

    > All gawked in amazement when: Bread-teaser assaulted us with:
    > <snipped out the uninteresting bits>
    > > if you wish
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > Ah ha! So you're the wish granter.
    > I wish you'd get a real news reader.
    > --
    > LRM
    > MCNGP 7^2
    > www.mcngp.com home of the bogosity singularity.
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QnJlYWQtdGVhc2Vy?=, Mar 29, 2006
    #9
  10. *yawn*

    --
    LoopBack


    "Bread-teaser" wrote:

    > Why would I want real news reader?
    > I can read your brains without having to downloading it.
    >
    > --
    > Bread teaser
    > The mans rule in life is to think, eat sh$t and sleep
    >
    >
    > "LRM" wrote:
    >
    > > All gawked in amazement when: Bread-teaser assaulted us with:
    > > <snipped out the uninteresting bits>
    > > > if you wish
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > > Ah ha! So you're the wish granter.
    > > I wish you'd get a real news reader.
    > > --
    > > LRM
    > > MCNGP 7^2
    > > www.mcngp.com home of the bogosity singularity.
    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?TG9vcGJhY2s=?=, Mar 29, 2006
    #10
  11. Briscobar

    Neil Guest

    did you hear "LRM" <> say in news:eBab75tUGHA.4740
    @TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl:

    > I wish you'd get a real news reader.


    I wish you would too ;)

    --
    The InterNeil MCNGP Triple X

    - Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.
     
    Neil, Mar 29, 2006
    #11
  12. Briscobar

    Neil Guest

    did you hear =?Utf-8?B?QnJlYWQtdGVhc2Vy?=
    <> say in news:3AC61DDE-7B21-482D-
    :

    > The world of GB and GHz can hold the entire enterprise in a single hard
    > drive.


    wow, that's hugely short sighted. As the GB and GHz go up so do data
    center costs. Increases in GHz will increase cooling requirements.
    Datacenter A/C ain't cheap. As for Gb, most datacenters deal in Tb now
    (thanks for playing) so storage still costs money. Personally, I worry
    about storage required for SQL backups and have investigated the various
    backups compression options. And guess what, those tools are typically
    based on things like PKZip and WinZip.

    --
    The InterNeil MCNGP Triple X

    - Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.
     
    Neil, Mar 29, 2006
    #12
  13. Briscobar

    Frisbee® Guest

    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9794A55DF7123ipostthereforeiam@127.0.0.1...
    > As Briscobar once said in microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse
    >
    >> http://kgbarchiver.sourceforge.net/?wp_ml=0

    >
    > Interesting.
    >
    > You know, information theory has given us a theoretical limit to how
    > much compression you can do. I played around with Huffman coding
    > and it was quite fascinating, to get the most compression, the trick
    > is to break the input into parts that can be compressed near the
    > optimal level. WinZip using a 4k sliding window to do this, but if
    > you take the time to analyze the file completely you should be able
    > to achieve very good compression. I worte a decent one in QuickBasic
    > a long time ago - very, very slow but fun.


    Small world. About fifteen years ago, I did the same kind of work with PDS.
    Ethan Winer was then the president of Crescent Software, and was impressed
    with a bug I'd found in his QuickPak software (he provided assembler source
    code with his software), and asked me to see what I could do with
    compression software. I studied quite a bit, but most samples were in C. I
    knew enough C to be able to pick up on it, though. Problem was, he really
    wanted the code to be in BASIC, if possible. I was doing LZW stuff, and
    while it was quite efficient, it was slow as hell. I'd spend three times as
    much time trying to optimize code as time spent doing the original code. I
    was even using his own alternate libraries for PDS, which did make it faster
    than stock PDS, but still it was unacceptable. I wound up telling him it
    would probably never sell unless at least part of it was written in
    assembler. I still have the source code for it all.

    It was a pretty cool learning experience, at least.
     
    Frisbee®, Mar 29, 2006
    #13
  14. Briscobar

    kpg Guest

    Observation:

    Programs, Operatiing systems, and the data they generate are like
    goldfish. They grow to the size of their container...or...er..disk
    space.

    This message brought to you by the people that make my dual-core
    pentium 4GHz run like an 8MHz 8088.

    kp "It's the Microsoft way" g
     
    kpg, Mar 29, 2006
    #14
  15. Briscobar

    kpg Guest

    > Yeah... I don't speak freaky deaky Dutch.

    Well good, because Huffman coding actually uses a binary tree,
    and the encoding is comprised of zeros and ones that describe
    how to traverse the tree to find the encoded character.
    Frequent characters are at the top of the tree, which uses the
    shortest coding, rare characters at the bottom.

    Don't get me started on Run Length Encoding, a very simple yet
    surprisingly effective compression technique, especially for
    images.

    Then there is the loss-full encoding used in jpeg files,
    because for photos it doesn't matter if you get a few pixels
    wrong.

    What about hardware possibilities, like tri-state devices,
    bits that can hold three pieces of information instead of
    just two.

    I'm getting so excited.
     
    kpg, Mar 29, 2006
    #15
  16. Briscobar

    Briscobar Guest

    Bread-teaser <> rambled:
    >
    > Maan.. Who cares anymore about that zip/rarr crap?
    > The world of GB and GHz can hold the entire enterprise in a single
    > hard drive. And if you not awake yet, checkout the iPods in stores
    > near you. It's the size of a credit card. and you can download to it
    > up to 60GB of mcngp crap if you wish


    If you're not kidding, you're rather dumb. It's very true that the sizes of
    hard drives, flash memory, and pretty much any other storage device, has
    risen quite dramatically over the last few years. However, if you haven't
    noticed, so has the size of many files people use on a regular basis. Gone
    are the days when you can store a week's worth of documents on a floppy. In
    fact, my company is outgrowing CDs, and we've just purchased 4 DVD writers
    so that we can keep up with the exponential increase in not only file size,
    but file count. Also, as Neil mentioned, I am also concerned with drive
    space due to SQL backups. We backup 5 databases every night to a file
    server, plus a tape drive. The tape gets pulled every night, but the backups
    on the server stay for a week (I guess this is company policy implemented
    years ago by the guy before the guy before me). Lately, we've been crunched
    for space. We can do one of three things: 1) Delete backups more frequently.
    2) Get a bigger hard drive(s) for the server. 3) Make the backups take up
    less room. Due to the nature of the company, plus the owners'
    tight-wad-ness, we chose option 3.

    Thank you for playing.

    --
    KB

    MCNGP #26
    www.mcngp.com iz t3h h0tn3ss
     
    Briscobar, Mar 29, 2006
    #16
  17. Briscobar

    Neil Guest

    did you hear kpg <> say in
    news:Xns97955053643C4ipostthereforeiam@127.0.0.1:

    > Programs, Operatiing systems, and the data they generate are like
    > goldfish. They grow to the size of their container...or...er..disk
    > space.


    true dat

    --
    The InterNeil MCNGP Triple X

    - When cows laugh, does milk come out their noses?
     
    Neil, Mar 29, 2006
    #17
  18. Briscobar

    Neil Guest

    did you hear kpg <> say in news:Xns979553256E52ipostthereforeiam@
    127.0.0.1:

    > I'm getting so excited.


    geek

    --
    The InterNeil MCNGP Triple X

    - There's always one more SOB than you counted on.
     
    Neil, Mar 29, 2006
    #18
  19. Briscobar

    kpg Guest

    As Neil once said in microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse

    >> I'm getting so excited.

    >
    > geek


    At last. The recognition I deserve.
     
    kpg, Mar 29, 2006
    #19
  20. Briscobar

    kpg Guest

    I just now (like 5 min ago) finished setting up our new back-back up
    system. We have always done nighly backup on tape of critical files
    (about 20GB), using 28 tapes, 14 rotated off site every two weeks..
    blah. blah...blah.

    What's new is the two 120GB USB drives, copy everything once, the sync
    the files that have changed nightly - the whole process takes about 15
    min compared to the tapes 3.5 hours, plus we get everything (about 70GB).

    As USB flash ram gets bigger (I'm thinking terrabyte in 5 years?) and
    cheaper,(I'm thinking free in a box of cereal) we will switch over to
    that.

    kpg
     
    kpg, Mar 29, 2006
    #20
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