(Semi) OT: Connecting guitar to sound card. Preamp?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by David, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. David

    David Guest

    Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.

    TIA

    David
     
    David, Feb 28, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David <> wrote:

    >Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    >on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    >I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    >speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    >annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    >need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    >level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    >myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    >terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >David


    I used Jaycar kit KJ-8090 "Guitar Link"$15.95 to do the same thing for
    my son. Powered by 8xAA cells. I'd recommend a metal box to simplify
    keeping it immune from external fields.
    The idiots at Jaycar sell the instructions for an extra $3. Let me
    know if you want me to hand them onto you.

    --
    Regards
    Malcolm
    Remove sharp objects to get a valid e-mail address
     
    Malcolm Moore, Feb 28, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. David

    SchoolTech Guest

    David wrote:
    > Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    > on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    > I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    > speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    > annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    > need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    > level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    > myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    > terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > David


    50Hz is usually an earth loop.

    DO NOT disconnect the mains earth.
    Ensure all the mains cables are plugged into the same wall socket or
    plugbox.

    If your guitar amp works without the hum when the amp is not connected
    to the Audigy then this is the most likely cause.
     
    SchoolTech, Feb 28, 2006
    #3
  4. On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:

    > Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    > on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    > I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    > speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    > annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    > need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    > level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    > myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    > terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > David


    You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.

    Cheers,
    John
     
    John A Fergusion, Feb 28, 2006
    #4
  5. David

    Brendan Guest

    On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:

    > Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    > on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    > I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    > speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    > annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    > need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    > level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    > myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    > terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.


    Since you know the frequency, maybe a good filter on the software side
    could filter your samples ? e.g. remove the 50hz buzz from the file ?

    Hardly ideal, but maybe it'll work. I had some free software that would
    analyze a (supposed to be silent) piece of the sample you specified, and
    then remove those patterns/freq from the entire sample. Worked quite well
    for cleaning up noisy samples - you just had to be careful not to over do
    it.

    I think Audacity does it; also some other free one some australian crowd
    makes.

    You'd just record a bit of silence on the end of the sample, which would of
    course have the buzz in it, and use that for the analysis bit. Delete it
    off afterwards.

    I cleaned up a shitty sample off the answer machine doing this. And they
    are hardly high quality recording devices... Why ? Long story, but I was
    bored AND trying to figure out who it was (yeah, the recording was that bad
    + the person spoke fast and was not talking directly into the phone I
    guess). It worked.

    --

    .... Brendan

    #5775 +(8483)- [X]

    * ab is away - gone, if anyone talks in the next 25 minutes as me it's bm
    being an asshole -
    <ab> HAHAHA DISREGARD THAT, I SUCK COCKS


    Note: All my comments are copyright 1/03/2006 10:31:56 a.m. and are opinion only where not otherwise stated and always "to the best of my recollection". www.computerman.orcon.net.nz.
     
    Brendan, Mar 1, 2006
    #5
  6. David

    Rob J Guest

    In article <1qwyem9unlymv$>, J.Ferguson@
    127.0.0.1 says...
    > On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    >
    > > Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    > > on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    > > I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    > > speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    > > annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    > > need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    > > level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    > > myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    > > terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    > >
    > > TIA
    > >
    > > David

    >
    > You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    > microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    > end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.


    It is rather unlikely you would get good results this way. A guitar
    preamp needs to have a very high input impedance and normally DIs are
    specially designed with this in mind.
     
    Rob J, Mar 1, 2006
    #6
  7. David

    David Guest

    John A Fergusion wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    >
    >> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    >> on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    >> I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    >> speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    >> annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    >> need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    >> level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    >> myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    >> terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> David

    >
    > You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    > microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    > end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > John


    This sounds quite awful. As Rob J says, the impedance is badly mismatched.
     
    David, Mar 2, 2006
    #7
  8. David

    David Guest

    Brendan wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    >
    >> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    >> on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    >> I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    >> speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    >> annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    >> need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    >> level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    >> myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    >> terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.

    >
    > Since you know the frequency, maybe a good filter on the software side
    > could filter your samples ? e.g. remove the 50hz buzz from the file ?
    >
    > Hardly ideal, but maybe it'll work. I had some free software that would
    > analyze a (supposed to be silent) piece of the sample you specified, and
    > then remove those patterns/freq from the entire sample. Worked quite well
    > for cleaning up noisy samples - you just had to be careful not to over do
    > it.
    >
    > I think Audacity does it; also some other free one some australian crowd
    > makes.
    >
    > You'd just record a bit of silence on the end of the sample, which would of
    > course have the buzz in it, and use that for the analysis bit. Delete it
    > off afterwards.
    >
    > I cleaned up a shitty sample off the answer machine doing this. And they
    > are hardly high quality recording devices... Why ? Long story, but I was
    > bored AND trying to figure out who it was (yeah, the recording was that bad
    > + the person spoke fast and was not talking directly into the phone I
    > guess). It worked.
    >


    Sounds interesting, but I don't really think this is what I want to do.
    Also I would prefer not to have to use the amp for this at all, its big
    and in the way and gets quite hot.
     
    David, Mar 2, 2006
    #8
  9. On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 15:16:02 +1300, David wrote:

    > John A Fergusion wrote:
    >> On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    >>
    >>> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    >>> on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    >>> I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    >>> speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    >>> annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    >>> need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    >>> level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    >>> myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    >>> terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >>>
    >>> TIA
    >>>
    >>> David

    >>
    >> You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    >> microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    >> end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> John

    >
    > This sounds quite awful. As Rob J says, the impedance is badly mismatched.


    Did you try it, or is it the suggestion that sounds awful?
     
    John A Ferguson, Mar 2, 2006
    #9
  10. David

    David Guest

    John A Ferguson wrote:
    > On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 15:16:02 +1300, David wrote:
    >
    >> John A Fergusion wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    >>>> on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    >>>> I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    >>>> speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    >>>> annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    >>>> need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    >>>> level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    >>>> myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    >>>> terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >>>>
    >>>> TIA
    >>>>
    >>>> David
    >>> You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    >>> microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    >>> end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.
    >>>
    >>> Cheers,
    >>> John

    >> This sounds quite awful. As Rob J says, the impedance is badly mismatched.

    >
    > Did you try it, or is it the suggestion that sounds awful?


    Sorry, I meant I tried it and it sounded awful, as if it was just a
    note, but not played on a guitar if you know what I mean :D. Thanks for
    the suggestion nonetheless.
     
    David, Mar 3, 2006
    #10
  11. David

    Rob J Guest

    In article <1653n38h0ft2p$>, J.Ferguson@
    127.0.0.1 says...
    > On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 15:16:02 +1300, David wrote:
    >
    > > John A Fergusion wrote:
    > >> On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    > >>> on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    > >>> I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    > >>> speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    > >>> annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    > >>> need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    > >>> level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    > >>> myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    > >>> terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    > >>>
    > >>> TIA
    > >>>
    > >>> David
    > >>
    > >> You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    > >> microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    > >> end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.
    > >>
    > >> Cheers,
    > >> John

    > >
    > > This sounds quite awful. As Rob J says, the impedance is badly mismatched.

    >
    > Did you try it, or is it the suggestion that sounds awful?


    You can try it and it may sound "OK" for a little while.

    Guitar pickups typically produce a high voltage and low current. To get
    a signal without distortion they need to be loaded by a preamp with a
    very high input impedance - which I think from memory should be in the
    100k - 1 Megohm range. The lower the impedance goes, the more likely you
    are to overload the pickup producing distortion etc.

    A mic input could go as low as 600 ohms - definitely not suitable.
     
    Rob J, Mar 3, 2006
    #11
  12. On Fri, 3 Mar 2006 19:45:41 +1300, Rob J wrote:

    > In article <1653n38h0ft2p$>, J.Ferguson@
    > 127.0.0.1 says...
    >> On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 15:16:02 +1300, David wrote:
    >>
    >>> John A Fergusion wrote:
    >>>> On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    >>>>> on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    >>>>> I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    >>>>> speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    >>>>> annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    >>>>> need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    >>>>> level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    >>>>> myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    >>>>> terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> TIA
    >>>>>
    >>>>> David
    >>>>
    >>>> You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    >>>> microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    >>>> end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.
    >>>>
    >>>> Cheers,
    >>>> John
    >>>
    >>> This sounds quite awful. As Rob J says, the impedance is badly mismatched.

    >>
    >> Did you try it, or is it the suggestion that sounds awful?

    >
    > You can try it and it may sound "OK" for a little while.


    Well it either will or it won't, it's not going to change over time.

    > Guitar pickups typically produce a high voltage and low current. To get
    > a signal without distortion they need to be loaded by a preamp with a
    > very high input impedance - which I think from memory should be in the
    > 100k - 1 Megohm range. The lower the impedance goes, the more likely you
    > are to overload the pickup producing distortion etc.


    What actually happens is that the input signal voltage is reduced based on
    the ratio of the pickup impedance to the mic input impedance. This means
    that more gain is required to achive an appropriate signal voltage. This
    higher gain is also applied to the self-noise at the mic input and thus the
    effective signal to noise ratio is lowered. Note that due to the reactive
    nature of the pickup there *may* also be some harmonic distortion when
    connected to a less than ideal impedance, but guitar players are often
    quite fond of distortion :)

    > A mic input could go as low as 600 ohms - definitely not suitable.


    I quite agree that a 600 ohm input would be unsiuitable, however I belive
    that the mic inputs on Sound Blaster's are typically around 50 k ohm. This
    is why many people do use this method for getting their guitar signal into
    their PCs.

    Cheers,
    John
     
    John A Ferguson, Mar 5, 2006
    #12
  13. On Fri, 03 Mar 2006 16:00:42 +1300, David wrote:

    > John A Ferguson wrote:
    >> On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 15:16:02 +1300, David wrote:
    >>
    >>> John A Fergusion wrote:
    >>>> On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:53:45 +1300, David wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    >>>>> on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    >>>>> I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    >>>>> speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    >>>>> annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    >>>>> need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    >>>>> level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    >>>>> myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    >>>>> terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> TIA
    >>>>>
    >>>>> David
    >>>> You could always try connecting your guitar directly to your Audigy2
    >>>> microphone input. You just need a cable with a 3.5mm mono jack plug on the
    >>>> end and a regular 6.5mm jack on the other.
    >>>>
    >>>> Cheers,
    >>>> John
    >>> This sounds quite awful. As Rob J says, the impedance is badly mismatched.

    >>
    >> Did you try it, or is it the suggestion that sounds awful?

    >
    > Sorry, I meant I tried it and it sounded awful, as if it was just a
    > note, but not played on a guitar if you know what I mean :D. Thanks for
    > the suggestion nonetheless.


    I think I know what you mean. Well, if what I think you mean is what you
    actually mean, then what you are hearing is the raw guitar pickup signal.
    This will not sound like your guitar normally does as it has not been
    through a guitar style preamp, amplifier and then guitar speaker/cabinet.
    Each of these stages colours and modifies the original signal.

    You will need to have some sort of amplifier/cabinet simulation software to
    run your signal through. A free example would be Amplitube UNO
    (http://www.betterguitar.com/Equipment/Recording/AmpliTube/AmpliTubeUno.html).

    I don't know why you're actually connecting to your PC. Are you trying to
    use your PC for recording, or for playing ? What software are you using ?

    Cheers,
    John
     
    John A Ferguson, Mar 5, 2006
    #13
  14. David wrote:
    > Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line Out
    > on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz buzz.
    > I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the amp's own
    > speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This gets especially
    > annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So I'm guessing I
    > need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's output up to line
    > level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't mind building something
    > myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine such a device being
    > terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and more fun) that way.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > David


    What you want is known as a D.I. - short for Direct Input I think.

    They come in two types: electronic or active and transformer or passive.
    Transformers are generally better as they don't need batteries and can cope
    with worse conditions.

    They work by breaking (passive) or compensating for (active) the earth loop
    between the guitar and amplifier and the mixing desk/computer/whatever you are
    connecting it to.

    Bespoke DIs can be quite expensive, but www.jaycar.co.nz sell a stereo
    isolation transformer part number AA3085 for abot $30 which is designed for car
    audio but which works remarkably well as a solution to earth loops in just
    about any audio setup.

    They also sell an active DI but it's more expensive and I can't seem to find it
    on their site.
     
    Mark Robinson, Mar 6, 2006
    #14
  15. David

    SchoolTech Guest

    Mark Robinson wrote:
    > David wrote:
    >> Currently I connect my electric guitar to my Audigy 2 using the Line
    >> Out on my guitar amp. However, this introduces a reasonably loud 50Hz
    >> buzz. I know this is the amp's fault, because I can hear it from the
    >> amp's own speaker too, even when the guitar is not connected. This
    >> gets especially annoying when I try to apply high gain VST effects. So
    >> I'm guessing I need some sort of simple preamp to bump the guitar's
    >> output up to line level. Can anyone recommend anything? I wouldn't
    >> mind building something myself if I had a schematic, I can't imagine
    >> such a device being terribly complex, so it could well be cheaper (and
    >> more fun) that way.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> David

    >
    > What you want is known as a D.I. - short for Direct Input I think.
    >
    > They come in two types: electronic or active and transformer or passive.
    > Transformers are generally better as they don't need batteries and can
    > cope with worse conditions.


    In theory. However in practice most transformer DIs use very cheap
    little ($20) units not suited to high quality audio. It is also very
    difficult (i.e. expensive) to get a DI transformer that has both a good
    frequency response and gives a high enough impedance loading to a guitar
    to get the best out of the instrument. For this reason an active DI is
    preferable.

    >
    > They work by breaking (passive) or compensating for (active) the earth
    > loop between the guitar and amplifier and the mixing
    > desk/computer/whatever you are connecting it to.


    Partly correct. A DI performs several functions:

    1. Unbalanced to balanced signal conversion.
    2. Impedance transformation from high to low.
    3. Earth isolation
    4. Active DIs often provide either amplification or attenuation of the
    source signal.

    > Bespoke DIs can be quite expensive, but www.jaycar.co.nz sell a stereo
    > isolation transformer part number AA3085 for abot $30 which is designed
    > for car audio but which works remarkably well as a solution to earth
    > loops in just about any audio setup.


    Don't expect such a cheap unit to produce hi-fi quality from its tinny
    little transformers. The Audigy is a low-end pro-grade card. You
    wouldn't want to cut corners on a DI if you've just spend $300 plus on a
    sound card as good as an Audigy.

    We paid nearly $200 for a Jensen Isomax DM2 transformer isolator for a
    recording input on an Audigy. Worth every cent considering the specs of
    the JT11 transformers it contains.

    > They also sell an active DI but it's more expensive and I can't seem to
    > find it on their site.


    The active DI is more expensive because it is most likely designed to
    hifi/proaudio specs. In fact it most likely does all four of the above
    functions.
     
    SchoolTech, Mar 6, 2006
    #15
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. benja

    gp3 files in alt.binaries.guitar.tab

    benja, Dec 18, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    2,902
    benja
    Dec 18, 2003
  2. Ionizer

    Power Tab: guitar/bass tabulature freeware

    Ionizer, Feb 13, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    4,073
    Smeagol's late friend
    Feb 19, 2005
  3. Guest

    Guitar through PC

    Guest, Jun 13, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    727
    Shep©
    Jun 14, 2005
  4. Spare
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    997
    Spare
    Mar 2, 2008
  5. thanatoid

    Phono preamp in old receiver problem

    thanatoid, Sep 9, 2010, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    21
    Views:
    2,995
    geeta k
    Mar 18, 2013
Loading...

Share This Page