self provisioning feature of cable modems

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by RT, Jul 27, 2004.

  1. RT

    RT Guest

    I am curious to know how the self provisioning feature of cable modems
    is architected in hotels. By this I mean, when I check in to my room,
    hook up my laptop, and open a browser, I get redirected to page
    describing the hotel's connecitivity policy.

    What happens behind the scenes? Assuming the hotel is using a CMTS
    box, DHCP server, and a router connected to a T1 link, how is my http
    traffic getting redirected to a page that I never requested in the
    first place.

    Any networking gurus out there who understand what happens
    under-the-hood?

    RT
     
    RT, Jul 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. It varies. Usually, though, the hotels are just handing out an RFC1918
    address and intercepting web traffic through a proxy like the Cisco BBSM
    (Building Broadband Service Manager), which authenticates the PC (usually by
    mac address) and then punches a hole through the proxy to allow you use the
    service.
     
    Phillip Remaker, Jul 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. RT

    Peter Peters Guest

    On 27 Jul 2004 15:24:04 -0700, (RT) wrote:

    >I am curious to know how the self provisioning feature of cable modems
    >is architected in hotels. By this I mean, when I check in to my room,
    >hook up my laptop, and open a browser, I get redirected to page
    >describing the hotel's connecitivity policy.
    >
    >What happens behind the scenes? Assuming the hotel is using a CMTS
    >box, DHCP server, and a router connected to a T1 link, how is my http
    >traffic getting redirected to a page that I never requested in the
    >first place.


    We are doing appr. the same thing with infected hosts that are put in
    quarantaine. We give out an IP address that is routed to a server that
    accepts every URL and answers with the "same" page. Routing is based on
    source IP addresses through Cisco's policy based routing facilities.

    But I know of a hotel that routes /30's to each room. Eacht room is in
    it's own VLAN so the router can do anything with the traffic that comes
    from or goes to that VLAN. And because of the routing the people in the
    room can't use any other address than provided.

    --
    Peter Peters, senior netwerkbeheerder
    Dienst Informatietechnologie, Bibliotheek en Educatie (ITBE)
    Universiteit Twente
     
    Peter Peters, Jul 29, 2004
    #3
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