Self Destructing DVDs

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by DavesVideo, Nov 13, 2004.

  1. DavesVideo

    DavesVideo Guest

    A while back someone started a silly thread about exploding DVDs, that hasn't
    quite happened, but they have developed self destruct ones. Sealed in an air
    tight package, once opened an air activated chemical process starts to darken
    the dyes. After about 4 days, the DVD is no longer readable. The makers have
    been trying to sell the idea to rental places so postage is only one way.


    Dave
    http://members.tripod.com/~VideoDave
     
    DavesVideo, Nov 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. >A while back someone started a silly thread about exploding DVDs,

    And another person was talking about DVDs with radioactive isotopes, which is
    another BS troll story.

    >that hasn't
    >quite happened, but they have developed self destruct ones. Sealed in an air
    >tight package, once opened an air activated chemical process starts to darken
    >the dyes. After about 4 days, the DVD is no longer readable.


    The FlexPlay/EZ-D product, and it goes bad after two days, not four.

    >The makers have
    >been trying to sell the idea to rental places so postage is only one way.


    In this case, the only company trying to push EZ-D is Buena Vista (Disney). So
    far, they haven't had much luck. I most certainly hope it stays that way, but
    I have a feeling that it probably will remain obscure. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. LASERandDVDfan wrote:

    > The FlexPlay/EZ-D product, and it goes bad after two days, not four.
    >
    >>The makers have
    >>been trying to sell the idea to rental places so postage is only one way.

    >
    > In this case, the only company trying to push EZ-D is Buena Vista (Disney). So
    > far, they haven't had much luck. I most certainly hope it stays that way, but
    > I have a feeling that it probably will remain obscure. - Reinhart


    Flexplay is a different company, and trying to sell "indie films that
    deserve a chance" [sic] like "Noel"--

    Oh, and they've now tried to get around the usual environmentalist
    "landfill" complaints, by allowing customers to recycle them back to the
    company...By postage.
    (Oh, well, that'll COMPLETELY crush Netflix!) :)

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Nov 13, 2004
    #3
  4. DavesVideo

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Derek Janssen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > LASERandDVDfan wrote:


    >> In this case, the only company trying to push EZ-D is Buena Vista
    >> (Disney). So
    >> far, they haven't had much luck. I most certainly hope it stays that
    >> way, but
    >> I have a feeling that it probably will remain obscure. - Reinhart

    >
    > Flexplay is a different company, and trying to sell "indie films that
    > deserve a chance" [sic] like "Noel"--


    As I understand it, Flexplay originated the technology and licensed it to
    EZ-CD. EZ-CD is now defunct and Flexplay is going it on their own, having
    acquired EZ-CD's assets (including, presumably, the already-licensed titles
    previously released by EZ-CD). I think there's a press release about this on
    Flexplay.com.

    RichC
     
    Rich Clark, Nov 13, 2004
    #4
  5. Rich Clark wrote:

    >>>In this case, the only company trying to push EZ-D is Buena Vista
    >>>(Disney). So
    >>>far, they haven't had much luck. I most certainly hope it stays that
    >>>way, but
    >>>I have a feeling that it probably will remain obscure. - Reinhart

    >>
    >>Flexplay is a different company, and trying to sell "indie films that
    >>deserve a chance" [sic] like "Noel"--

    >
    > As I understand it, Flexplay originated the technology and licensed it to
    > EZ-CD. EZ-CD is now defunct and Flexplay is going it on their own, having
    > acquired EZ-CD's assets (including, presumably, the already-licensed titles
    > previously released by EZ-CD). I think there's a press release about this on
    > Flexplay.com.


    And here's the *free* press:
    http://tinyurl.com/4sdvq

    Derek Janssen (people just don't remember what happened with "Pirates of
    Penzance")
     
    Derek Janssen, Nov 14, 2004
    #5
  6. DavesVideo

    DavesVideo Guest

    Derek Janssen said:

    >>people just don't remember what happened with "Pirates of Penzance">>


    I sure don't. I'm guessing it is no longer available on DVD?


    Dave
    http://members.tripod.com/~VideoDave
     
    DavesVideo, Nov 14, 2004
    #6
  7. DavesVideo wrote:
    >
    >>>people just don't remember what happened with "Pirates of Penzance">>

    >
    > I sure don't. I'm guessing it is no longer available on DVD?


    Nope:
    This was back in 1983, when the new invention of cable and pay-per-view
    were getting the same tech-smitten "Wow, isn't this NEAT?...Someday,
    we'll order our groceries through interactive cable, too!" treatment
    that destructible DVD's and downloadable movies get today--
    And, like "no-rental" DVD's, the one Holy Grail of cable/PPV that
    everyone and his brother Sid wanted to experiment with was "Sayyyy,
    wouldn't it be neat if you could watch a new movie in your home the same
    day it opened in theaters?"

    So, they tried it--And the most family-friendly G-rated guinea pig was
    selected as first victim.
    Unfortunately, every theater chain in the country actually BELIEVED this
    Neat-O New Technology would change the world, and boycotted the movie in
    protest--The movie was ultimately exiled to a handful of indie
    arthouses, and Universal cut their losses two weeks into the run.
    (And it was Kevin Kline's best comedy, too!)

    ....Now, apply the above to theaters actually believing the "unique
    distribution" system publicity and refusing to show "Noel".
    Except for the part about being good.

    Derek Janssen (and we're still waiting for the DVD, but that's just
    Universal)
     
    Derek Janssen, Nov 14, 2004
    #7
  8. >Flexplay is a different company, and trying to sell "indie films that
    >deserve a chance" [sic] like "Noel"--


    Yeah, just found out.

    Flexplay is currently a division of the Convex Group.

    >Oh, and they've now tried to get around the usual environmentalist
    >"landfill" complaints, by allowing customers to recycle them back to the
    >company...By postage.
    >(Oh, well, that'll COMPLETELY crush Netflix!) :)


    And, to add insult to injury, the person who bought the Flexplay disc has to
    pay for the postage. :p

    Anyways, I can't see how Flexplay can be successful in the long run. The very
    nature of the product limits the kind of releases that it can have.

    You can only release what's popular with the mainstream and/or are most
    marketable in order to sell the most discs, and usually films that will get
    released are the kind that usually caters to the lowest common denominator.

    Nothing that's cutting edge would ever be considered for release on Flexplay
    since they wouldn't be able to sell enough of them to turn a good profit at the
    average retail price, plus the product has a one year shelf life further
    reducing the potential of a larger, more eclectic selection.

    Broad selection are the main points that puts regular DVD and rental outlets
    above Flexplay. Even Blockbuster can have quite a few obscure but decent
    movies available for rent or purchase on DVD that will never see a release on
    Flexplay. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 15, 2004
    #8
  9. LASERandDVDfan wrote:

    > Anyways, I can't see how Flexplay can be successful in the long run. The very
    > nature of the product limits the kind of releases that it can have.
    >
    > You can only release what's popular with the mainstream and/or are most
    > marketable in order to sell the most discs, and usually films that will get
    > released are the kind that usually caters to the lowest common denominator.


    And, y'know, one point in EZ-D's favor:
    After "The Hot Chick", "Frida" and "25th Hour", do you realize how
    *LONG* it took Disney to finally stumble upon the idea of "Sayyy, what
    if we put 'Pirates of the Caribbean' out as one of the rentals?"?

    (Unless, like the rest of us, they figured that most who wanted to see
    it very decidedly wanted to own a permanent copy...
    Here we see the basic double-edged problem.)

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Nov 15, 2004
    #9
  10. DavesVideo

    awknod Guest

    How much will these self destructing discs be to rent?
    "Derek Janssen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > LASERandDVDfan wrote:
    >
    > > Anyways, I can't see how Flexplay can be successful in the long run.

    The very
    > > nature of the product limits the kind of releases that it can have.
    > >
    > > You can only release what's popular with the mainstream and/or are most
    > > marketable in order to sell the most discs, and usually films that will

    get
    > > released are the kind that usually caters to the lowest common

    denominator.
    >
    > And, y'know, one point in EZ-D's favor:
    > After "The Hot Chick", "Frida" and "25th Hour", do you realize how
    > *LONG* it took Disney to finally stumble upon the idea of "Sayyy, what
    > if we put 'Pirates of the Caribbean' out as one of the rentals?"?
    >
    > (Unless, like the rest of us, they figured that most who wanted to see
    > it very decidedly wanted to own a permanent copy...
    > Here we see the basic double-edged problem.)
    >
    > Derek Janssen
    >
     
    awknod, Nov 16, 2004
    #10
  11. DavesVideo

    Pug Fugley Guest

    "awknod" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > How much will these self destructing discs be to rent?


    $5.99 + shipping, doubt you'll be able to find them locally anywhere.
     
    Pug Fugley, Nov 16, 2004
    #11
  12. awknod wrote:

    > How much will these self destructing discs be to rent?


    About the same as to buy the regular versions at Wal-Mart...
    That's why they flopped the first time.

    Derek Janssen (hey, that wasn't the reason *I* picked, but it's the one
    that seems to have stuck)
     
    Derek Janssen, Nov 16, 2004
    #12
  13. >Anyways, I can't see how Flexplay can be successful in the long run. The
    >very
    >nature of the product limits the kind of releases that it can have.


    I'm kind of surprised that studios haven't experimented with Flexplay for
    screener DVDs; it still allows them to send out review copies at will, and
    undermines aftermarket sales of the disc.

    I'm also kind of curious as to how deep the color-changing layer is- it'd be
    funny if it could be removed with a few runs through a DiscDoctor.
     
    Robert Morgan, Nov 16, 2004
    #13
  14. DavesVideo

    John Savard Guest

    On 16 Nov 2004 12:59:30 GMT, robozz (Robert Morgan)
    wrote, in part:

    >I'm kind of surprised that studios haven't experimented with Flexplay for
    >screener DVDs; it still allows them to send out review copies at will, and
    >undermines aftermarket sales of the disc.


    But the problem with a screener DVD is that the digital bits on it can
    be cracked and then preserved on other media. A thing like Flexplay
    affects this not at all.

    The solution for screener DVDs is simple. Put the movie on a DVD-ROM
    scrambled with a custom code, instead of just CSS, and along with the
    DVD-ROM, ship a special player that will descramble and play the disk.

    Of course, analogue video signals are still vulnerable to copying, but
    this would actually make the kind of copying that is the problem a
    little more awkward.

    John Savard
    http://home.ecn.ab.ca/~jsavard/index.html
     
    John Savard, Nov 16, 2004
    #14
  15. >Of course, analogue video signals are still vulnerable to copying, but
    >this would actually make the kind of copying that is the problem a
    >little more awkward.


    A way around this is watermarking. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 16, 2004
    #15
  16. >But the problem with a screener DVD is that the digital bits on it can
    >be cracked and then preserved on other media. A thing like Flexplay
    >affects this not at all.


    Right... but aftermarket sales are another one of the problems of screener
    DVDs.

    The encrypted DVDs scenario would work for Academy reviewers, but I can't
    imagine many magazine/lifestyle/website reviewers wanting to use non-standard
    equipment in their home theater set-ups (unless the studios then want to
    provide reference-quality players).
     
    Robert Morgan, Nov 17, 2004
    #16
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