Self-Destructing DVD: Picture of Disc & Package.

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by One-Shot Scot, Nov 13, 2004.

  1. A DVD of the Christmas-themed movie "Noel" carries warnings that the
    movie must be used immediately after opening, because it has been
    recorded on a "disposable" disc, in this product shot made Thursday,
    Nov. 11, 2004.

    Disposable DVDs look and play like normal DVDs, except that their
    playable surface is dark red. Each disc contains a chemical time-bomb
    that begins ticking once it's exposed to air. Typically, after 48 hours,
    the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
    no longer can read it.

    The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
    stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services. After the
    movie is watched, the consumer tosses it into the trash, eliminating
    late fees and the cost of return mail but creating a potentially large
    new source of trash.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=249081
     
    One-Shot Scot, Nov 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. One-Shot Scot

    Jon Purkey Guest

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 05:33:38 -0800, "One-Shot Scot" <>
    wrote:

    >http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=249081


    From the article:

    "(Discs can live as little as one hour or as long as 60 hours.)"

    So that means the DVD could self-destruct before the movie has even
    finished? I suppose then you would have to buy a second one to see the
    rest of the movie? :)

    I'd probably copy it immediately to my computer and then watch it as
    often as I wanted. Or just spend the extra $$ for the regular DVD. Or
    watch it on the Moon...


    -
    -Jon Purkey - <)
    For a quicker reply by email please use the
    address found here: http://tinyurl.com/o8ka
     
    Jon Purkey, Nov 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. >Typically, after 48 hours,
    >the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
    >no longer can read it.


    One concern could be that the 48 hour window is an approximation.

    Actual time to failure will vary not only with how the disc deteriorates, but
    also how different players will handle a disc that is decaying. Not all DVD
    players are made equal and some may quit working with the disc several hours
    before the intended expiration.

    >The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
    >stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services.


    My concern about this point is that it ends up limiting Flexplay releases only
    to mainstream hits, ignoring other interesting films. This is where rental
    outlets and Netflix has an edge over Flexplay. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 14, 2004
    #3
  4. One-Shot Scot

    Richard C. Guest

    Richard C., Nov 14, 2004
    #4
  5. One-Shot Scot

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <4197aec7$0$31260$>, Richard
    C. <> wrote:

    > X-No-archive: yes
    >
    > "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=249081
    > >

    > =============================
    >
    > And just what happens if it "destructs" while it is in the player and
    > playing?
    >

    You're out of luck. In a perfect world, they'd be able to control the
    decay somewhat and have it happen progressivly. For example, if it took
    two hours for a dvd to be deleted, starting with the first tracks,
    anyone who is able to start watching a film would be able to finish it
    unless they paused it for awhile.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
     
    Invid Fan, Nov 14, 2004
    #5
  6. One-Shot Scot

    Del March Guest

    << You're out of luck. In a perfect world, they'd be able to control the
    decay somewhat and have it happen progressivly. For example, if it took
    two hours for a dvd to be deleted, starting with the first tracks,
    anyone who is able to start watching a film would be able to finish it
    unless they paused it for awhile. >><BR><BR>
    It would be cool if the decay didn't start until the disk was exposed to a
    laser, thus guaranteeing at least one complete viewing.
     
    Del March, Nov 14, 2004
    #6
  7. One-Shot Scot

    Pug Fugley Guest

    "Del March" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > << You're out of luck. In a perfect world, they'd be able to control the
    > decay somewhat and have it happen progressivly. For example, if it took
    > two hours for a dvd to be deleted, starting with the first tracks,
    > anyone who is able to start watching a film would be able to finish it
    > unless they paused it for awhile. >><BR><BR>
    > It would be cool if the decay didn't start until the disk was exposed to a
    > laser, thus guaranteeing at least one complete viewing.


    ....or one good copy, allowing unlimited viewing at any time :)
     
    Pug Fugley, Nov 15, 2004
    #7
  8. "LASERandDVDfan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >Typically, after 48 hours,
    >the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
    >no longer can read it.


    <<One concern could be that the 48 hour window is an approximation.>>

    <<Actual time to failure will vary not only with how the disc
    deteriorates, but also how different players will handle a disc that is
    decaying. Not all DVD players are made equal and some may quit working
    with the disc several hours before the intended expiration.>>

    >The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
    >stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services.


    <<My concern about this point is that it ends up limiting Flexplay
    releases only to mainstream hits, ignoring other interesting films.
    This is where rental outlets and Netflix has an edge over Flexplay. -
    Reinhart>>


    Apparently, the disk turns from a translucent red to an impenetrable
    black. During the final hours of disk decay, a player might be able to
    read parts of the disk and not others. And of course, some players will
    be able to compensate for the missing information better than others.

    My concern about this format is that it will consist mainly of exclusive
    titles --- such as _Noel.
     
    One-Shot Scot, Nov 15, 2004
    #8
  9. One-Shot Scot

    Mike Kohary Guest

    One-Shot Scot wrote:
    >
    > My concern about this format is that it will consist mainly of
    > exclusive titles --- such as _Noel.


    It's notable that this film is actually a current theatrical release, and
    the release on Flexplay is concurrent. In 6 months time, I think we can
    assume this title will see a regular, conventional DVD release.

    --
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Mike Kohary mike at kohary dot com http://www.kohary.com

    Karma Photography: http://www.karmaphotography.com
    Seahawks Historical Database: http://www.kohary.com/seahawks
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Mike Kohary, Nov 15, 2004
    #9
  10. On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 16:53:40 -0800, "One-Shot Scot" <>
    wrote:

    >"LASERandDVDfan" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>Typically, after 48 hours,
    >>the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
    >>no longer can read it.

    >
    ><<One concern could be that the 48 hour window is an approximation.>>
    >
    ><<Actual time to failure will vary not only with how the disc
    >deteriorates, but also how different players will handle a disc that is
    >decaying. Not all DVD players are made equal and some may quit working
    >with the disc several hours before the intended expiration.>>
    >
    >>The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
    >>stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services.

    >
    ><<My concern about this point is that it ends up limiting Flexplay
    >releases only to mainstream hits, ignoring other interesting films.
    >This is where rental outlets and Netflix has an edge over Flexplay. -
    >Reinhart>>
    >
    >
    >Apparently, the disk turns from a translucent red to an impenetrable
    >black. During the final hours of disk decay, a player might be able to
    >read parts of the disk and not others. And of course, some players will
    >be able to compensate for the missing information better than others.
    >
    >My concern about this format is that it will consist mainly of exclusive
    >titles --- such as _Noel.


    I suspect, actually, that Noel will become available later as a
    regular DVD. The problem is that Noel was not picked up by a
    distributor in N.America, therefore the Flexplay discs are the
    equivalent of it's theatrical release. to be followed down the road by
    a regular DVD release.

    Personally I think it's silly, but that seems to be the logic.

    G
    >
     
    grant kinsley, Nov 15, 2004
    #10
  11. One-Shot Scot

    Dick Sidbury Guest

    grant kinsley wrote:

    >
    >
    > I suspect, actually, that Noel will become available later as a
    > regular DVD. The problem is that Noel was not picked up by a
    > distributor in N.America, therefore the Flexplay discs are the
    > equivalent of it's theatrical release. to be followed down the road by
    > a regular DVD release.


    Ebert and Roeper reviewed Noel this week. It apparently is getting a US
    theatrical release and the diposable at about the same time. Also
    according to them it will get a TV release (TNT??) very soon after that
    (a few weeks). And eventually a regular DVD release.

    dick
    -- oh and for those of you who are interested, two thumbs down.
     
    Dick Sidbury, Nov 15, 2004
    #11
  12. Dick Sidbury wrote:

    >> I suspect, actually, that Noel will become available later as a
    >> regular DVD. The problem is that Noel was not picked up by a
    >> distributor in N.America, therefore the Flexplay discs are the
    >> equivalent of it's theatrical release. to be followed down the road by
    >> a regular DVD release.

    >
    > Ebert and Roeper reviewed Noel this week. It apparently is getting a US
    > theatrical release and the diposable at about the same time. Also
    > according to them it will get a TV release (TNT??) very soon after that
    > (a few weeks). And eventually a regular DVD release.
    >
    > -- oh and for those of you who are interested, two thumbs down.


    http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041111/REVIEWS/41103004/1023

    "Only a cynic could dislike this movie, which may be why I disliked it.
    I can be sentimental under the right circumstances, but the movie is
    such a calculating tearjerker that it played like a challenge to me.
    There's a point at which the plot crosses an invisible line, becoming so
    preposterous that it's no longer moving and is just plain weird."

    Derek Janssen (so, they're putting it on special experimental disk
    because nobody wants it?--O-kayyyy.....)
     
    Derek Janssen, Nov 15, 2004
    #12
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