Selecting the right image size for 5 by 7 prints on a 7MP camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by success_ny@yahoo.com, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I am new to digital cameras. I just bought Sony DCS-P200 that is a 7m
    digital camera. I like 5 by 7 photo prints, and I am wondering what is
    the recommended image size to produce the best 5 by 7 photo prints
    without using unnecessarily large image size?

    Does it make sense to select 3072 by 2304 which is 7 megapixels?
    Would one see any difference on the 5 by 7 photo print if I select 2592
    by 1944 (5 MP) compare to 7MP?

    Basically, I don't want to waste memory, but I don't want to compromise
    picture quality either. I don't plan to create any pictures larger than
    5 by 7 inches.

    Thanks!
    , Jul 13, 2005
    #1
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  2. Owamanga Guest

    On 13 Jul 2005 11:00:05 -0700, wrote:

    >I am new to digital cameras. I just bought Sony DCS-P200 that is a 7m
    >digital camera. I like 5 by 7 photo prints, and I am wondering what is
    >the recommended image size to produce the best 5 by 7 photo prints
    >without using unnecessarily large image size?
    >
    >Does it make sense to select 3072 by 2304 which is 7 megapixels?
    >Would one see any difference on the 5 by 7 photo print if I select 2592
    >by 1944 (5 MP) compare to 7MP?
    >
    >Basically, I don't want to waste memory, but I don't want to compromise
    >picture quality either. I don't plan to create any pictures larger than
    >5 by 7 inches.


    I would have thought that 5Mp is enough. However, the 7Mpixel option
    gives you more freedom for cropping/zooming.

    Just do a test. Shoot the same scene in both modes, get them printed
    at 5x7 and see if one looks better than the other.

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
    Owamanga, Jul 13, 2005
    #2
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  3. Tumbleweed Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am new to digital cameras. I just bought Sony DCS-P200 that is a 7m
    > digital camera. I like 5 by 7 photo prints, and I am wondering what is
    > the recommended image size to produce the best 5 by 7 photo prints
    > without using unnecessarily large image size?
    >
    > Does it make sense to select 3072 by 2304 which is 7 megapixels?
    > Would one see any difference on the 5 by 7 photo print if I select 2592
    > by 1944 (5 MP) compare to 7MP?
    >
    > Basically, I don't want to waste memory, but I don't want to compromise
    > picture quality either. I don't plan to create any pictures larger than
    > 5 by 7 inches.
    >
    > Thanks!


    memory is cheap (even with Sony). Taking at 7m will give you more ability
    to zoom and crop.

    --
    Tumbleweed

    email replies not necessary but to contact use;
    tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
    Tumbleweed, Jul 13, 2005
    #3
  4. Celcius Guest

    Hi!

    What I do (Canon Rebel XT, 8MP camera) is to crop the photo in Photoshop,
    specifying 7 x 5 (or reverse) and verifying in "image", "image size". It
    will indicate how many pixels per inch the photo has. I consider 250
    pixels/inch good enough to print but I suppose 300 is better. Therefore,
    yes. Take the biggest and finest picture and you can crop it to your taste.
    Don't leave the cropping to the store or to your printer. Better you be the
    judge and crop according to your taste.

    With my camera, a photo might come out as 48 inches by 32 inches at 72
    pixels. Once I crop it at 7 x 5 in Photoshop (cropping the picture at
    maximum), it will be 455 pixels per inch. This means I can crop out 35% of
    the photo and still get 300 pixels per inch.

    Hope this helps

    Marcel



    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am new to digital cameras. I just bought Sony DCS-P200 that is a 7m
    > digital camera. I like 5 by 7 photo prints, and I am wondering what is
    > the recommended image size to produce the best 5 by 7 photo prints
    > without using unnecessarily large image size?
    >
    > Does it make sense to select 3072 by 2304 which is 7 megapixels?
    > Would one see any difference on the 5 by 7 photo print if I select 2592
    > by 1944 (5 MP) compare to 7MP?
    >
    > Basically, I don't want to waste memory, but I don't want to compromise
    > picture quality either. I don't plan to create any pictures larger than
    > 5 by 7 inches.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    Celcius, Jul 13, 2005
    #4
  5. Jim Townsend Guest

    wrote:

    > I am new to digital cameras. I just bought Sony DCS-P200 that is a 7m
    > digital camera. I like 5 by 7 photo prints, and I am wondering what is
    > the recommended image size to produce the best 5 by 7 photo prints
    > without using unnecessarily large image size?



    300 pixels per inch will give you photo quality images, so all
    you NEED for a 5 x 7 print is 2100 x 1500 pixels.

    Having said that, there's no such thing as an "unnecessarily large
    image size" :) You should always use the highest quality setting.
    Camera memory is cheap nowadays..

    This gives you much greater latitude for cropping and should you
    decide you want to print larger, you have the pixels to do it.




    >
    > Does it make sense to select 3072 by 2304 which is 7 megapixels?
    > Would one see any difference on the 5 by 7 photo print if I select 2592
    > by 1944 (5 MP) compare to 7MP?
    >
    > Basically, I don't want to waste memory, but I don't want to compromise
    > picture quality either. I don't plan to create any pictures larger than
    > 5 by 7 inches.
    >
    > Thanks!
    Jim Townsend, Jul 13, 2005
    #5
  6. Larry Guest

    In article <>, owamanga-not-this-
    says...
    > >I am new to digital cameras. I just bought Sony DCS-P200 that is a 7m
    > >digital camera. I like 5 by 7 photo prints, and I am wondering what is
    > >the recommended image size to produce the best 5 by 7 photo prints
    > >without using unnecessarily large image size?
    > >
    > >Does it make sense to select 3072 by 2304 which is 7 megapixels?
    > >Would one see any difference on the 5 by 7 photo print if I select 2592
    > >by 1944 (5 MP) compare to 7MP?
    > >
    > >Basically, I don't want to waste memory, but I don't want to compromise
    > >picture quality either. I don't plan to create any pictures larger than
    > >5 by 7 inches.

    >
    > I would have thought that 5Mp is enough. However, the 7Mpixel option
    > gives you more freedom for cropping/zooming.
    >
    > Just do a test. Shoot the same scene in both modes, get them printed
    > at 5x7 and see if one looks better than the other.
    >
    > --
    > Owamanga!
    > http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
    >
    >


    The best possible way to use the camera is to shoot at the highest
    resolution, with the least compression.

    You NEVER know what you may capture when you press that button. You just
    might end up with something worthy of being printed at the largest size
    available to you.


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
    Larry, Jul 13, 2005
    #6
  7. Owamanga Guest

    On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 15:52:23 -0400, Larry
    <> wrote:

    >The best possible way to use the camera is to shoot at the highest
    >resolution, with the least compression.
    >
    >You NEVER know what you may capture when you press that button. You just
    >might end up with something worthy of being printed at the largest size
    >available to you.


    Although I agree with you on principle, there are two cases where this
    doesn't work:

    Lets assume that you mean RAW when that feature is available - it is
    after all the best quality data you can get from the camera. A college
    of mine shoots on some Olympus thing - can't remember what, but it's a
    couple of years old now. RAW means he shoots a frame and then has to
    wait 15 seconds before it's written to the card (uncompressed TIFF
    file I believe). During this time he can't do anything with the
    camera.

    Small muslim countries have been invaded in the 14 seconds between him
    pressing the button and being able to take another shot. So *here* he
    may be better off shooting jpeg.

    (I may be exaggerating the write-time a little, but it seems like
    forever)

    Case 2: Your 1Gb card is nearly full, you have 2 frames left and
    Concord has only just caught fire. Had you been shooting 5Mpix JPEG
    instead of 7Mpix Jpeg, you'd have 23 frames remaining. No time to
    bugger about deleting, format the card or swap it out, the plane is
    burning *now*.

    Just to clarify however, I am a RAW shooter, and believe that anybody
    who owns Photoshop should shoot RAW if they can.

    --
    Owamanga!
    http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
    Owamanga, Jul 13, 2005
    #7
  8. Bob Williams Guest

    wrote:
    > I am new to digital cameras. I just bought Sony DCS-P200 that is a 7m
    > digital camera. I like 5 by 7 photo prints, and I am wondering what is
    > the recommended image size to produce the best 5 by 7 photo prints
    > without using unnecessarily large image size?
    >
    > Does it make sense to select 3072 by 2304 which is 7 megapixels?
    > Would one see any difference on the 5 by 7 photo print if I select 2592
    > by 1944 (5 MP) compare to 7MP?
    >
    > Basically, I don't want to waste memory, but I don't want to compromise
    > picture quality either. I don't plan to create any pictures larger than
    > 5 by 7 inches.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >

    As most everyone has advised, I too recommend taking all your pix at
    7MP and Lowest compression.
    You paid a premium price for a 7MP camera. Why not get the best it has
    to offer? Accepting lesser quality to save Memory Card space is hardly
    a valid rationale anymore. Memory is quite inexpensive nowadays and is
    getting cheaper all the time. You may THINK that you won't want to print
    anything larger than 5x7 but as you gain skill in picture taking and
    photo editing I predict that you will be printing more and more 8x10s.
    Bob Williams
    Bob Williams, Jul 14, 2005
    #8
  9. Celcius Guest

    Owamanga,

    > Case 2: Your 1Gb card is nearly full, you have 2 frames left and
    > Concord has only just caught fire. Had you been shooting 5Mpix JPEG
    > instead of 7Mpix Jpeg, you'd have 23 frames remaining. No time to
    > bugger about deleting, format the card or swap it out, the plane is
    > burning *now*.


    Your bad case case scenario (above) doesn't necessarily hold water because
    the same scenario could happen with a 2MP, 3MP, 5MP... ad nauseam. Of
    course, at one point in time, you may not have any memory left and might
    miss the next shot. I could also add that had he had a 3MP camera, he would
    have had more than 23 pics left. So where does this lead us? ;-)

    > Lets assume that you mean RAW when that feature is available - it is
    > after all the best quality data you can get from the camera. A college
    > of mine shoots on some Olympus thing - can't remember what, but it's a
    > couple of years old now. RAW means he shoots a frame and then has to
    > wait 15 seconds before it's written to the card (uncompressed TIFF
    > file I believe). During this time he can't do anything with the
    > camera.


    What's the point? If you shoot RAW, then you might not be able to take the
    next picture on time? Cameras now have buffers. You don't need to wait. This
    doesn't preclude the fact that it's better to shoot as large ans fine as it
    is possible.

    Cheers,

    Marcel


    "Owamanga" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 15:52:23 -0400, Larry
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >The best possible way to use the camera is to shoot at the highest
    > >resolution, with the least compression.
    > >
    > >You NEVER know what you may capture when you press that button. You just
    > >might end up with something worthy of being printed at the largest size
    > >available to you.

    >
    > Although I agree with you on principle, there are two cases where this
    > doesn't work:
    >
    > Lets assume that you mean RAW when that feature is available - it is
    > after all the best quality data you can get from the camera. A college
    > of mine shoots on some Olympus thing - can't remember what, but it's a
    > couple of years old now. RAW means he shoots a frame and then has to
    > wait 15 seconds before it's written to the card (uncompressed TIFF
    > file I believe). During this time he can't do anything with the
    > camera.
    >
    > Small muslim countries have been invaded in the 14 seconds between him
    > pressing the button and being able to take another shot. So *here* he
    > may be better off shooting jpeg.
    >
    > (I may be exaggerating the write-time a little, but it seems like
    > forever)
    >
    > Case 2: Your 1Gb card is nearly full, you have 2 frames left and
    > Concord has only just caught fire. Had you been shooting 5Mpix JPEG
    > instead of 7Mpix Jpeg, you'd have 23 frames remaining. No time to
    > bugger about deleting, format the card or swap it out, the plane is
    > burning *now*.
    >
    > Just to clarify however, I am a RAW shooter, and believe that anybody
    > who owns Photoshop should shoot RAW if they can.
    >
    > --
    > Owamanga!
    > http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
    Celcius, Jul 14, 2005
    #9
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