Segate 160 GB SATA Nightmare! HELP!

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by josephclange@gmail.com, Jul 30, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hi all-- Hopefully someone can help.

    I have a Dell Inspiron 8600, 2ghz, 1 gb RAM. I recently bought a
    Serial ATA PCMCIA card so i could hookup a Seagate Barracuda 160 GB
    drive. It is an internal 3.5" drive that i am running externally- with
    an enclosure.

    I went through all the Disk Wizard setup with no problem - it said i
    formatted the drive and everything should be peachy. But when i try to
    access the drive through Windows XP, it says it is not formatted. I
    have tried many times to format it through Disk Manager, but it is
    extremely slow... (only 23% OVERNIGHT).

    All drivers are current, and cannot be updated. I have also gone to
    the dell.com site and updated my BIOS - but to no avail. The PCMCIA
    card seems to work fine-- the drive is recognized but it is seen as
    formatted.

    Another thing-- when the SATA cables are hooked up and i restart, my
    laptop stalls on the "Windows XP with scrolling status bar" and will
    stay there forever, until i power down, and disconnect the cable.

    I can't seem to crack this one. Any options?
    , Jul 30, 2006
    #1
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  2. Ernie Werbel Guest

    I had a similar problem. Check for a loose SATA connector. That caused
    hangups for me when Windows was loading and formatting errors.

    IDE was working great. I can't see why they can't just leave well enough
    alone.

    Good luck!


    wrote in message
    <>...
    >Hi all-- Hopefully someone can help.
    >
    >I have a Dell Inspiron 8600, 2ghz, 1 gb RAM. I recently bought a
    >Serial ATA PCMCIA card so i could hookup a Seagate Barracuda 160 GB
    >drive. It is an internal 3.5" drive that i am running externally- with
    >an enclosure.
    >
    >I went through all the Disk Wizard setup with no problem - it said i
    >formatted the drive and everything should be peachy. But when i try to
    >access the drive through Windows XP, it says it is not formatted. I
    >have tried many times to format it through Disk Manager, but it is
    >extremely slow... (only 23% OVERNIGHT).
    >
    >All drivers are current, and cannot be updated. I have also gone to
    >the dell.com site and updated my BIOS - but to no avail. The PCMCIA
    >card seems to work fine-- the drive is recognized but it is seen as
    >formatted.
    >
    >Another thing-- when the SATA cables are hooked up and i restart, my
    >laptop stalls on the "Windows XP with scrolling status bar" and will
    >stay there forever, until i power down, and disconnect the cable.
    >
    >I can't seem to crack this one. Any options?
    >
    Ernie Werbel, Jul 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 15:29:27 GMT, in alt.computer "Ernie Werbel"
    <no_spam_please@fake_email_address.xyz> wrote:


    |IDE was working great. I can't see why they can't just leave well enough
    |alone.

    Bandwidth=big pipes\speed
    Teh White Recluse, Jul 30, 2006
    #3
  4. bmoag Guest

    Actually there is a physical limit to how fast magnetic info can be read off
    a platter that is slower than current IDE/SATA transmission standards. That
    is why the new trend is to include flash memory in hard drives and try to
    develop predictive caching schemes that will prefetch needed data and
    temporarily store it in the more rapidly accessible flash memory.
    All of this is a stopgap until flash memory, electronic or some form of
    holography, completely replaces the dinosaur magnetic hard drive that still
    runs on "winchester" technology developed in the 1950s.
    O brave new world that hath no fossil fuel left and is hotter than the
    surface of Venus . . .
    bmoag, Jul 30, 2006
    #4
  5. - Bobb - Guest

    "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    news:4E5zg.59453$...
    > Actually there is a physical limit to how fast magnetic info can be
    > read off a platter that is slower than current IDE/SATA transmission
    > standards. That is why the new trend is to include flash memory in
    > hard drives and try to develop predictive caching schemes that will
    > prefetch needed data and temporarily store it in the more rapidly
    > accessible flash memory.
    > All of this is a stopgap until flash memory, electronic or some form
    > of holography, completely replaces the dinosaur magnetic hard drive
    > that still runs on "winchester" technology developed in the 1950s.


    Which was used because it was cheaper than boxes of core memory.
    Seems like eventually we're going full circle.
    - Bobb -, Aug 3, 2006
    #5
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