Seeking for a filter (hardware or soft) that does this...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Laszlo Lebrun, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. Hi community,
    have you ever looked into a very bright point?
    You surely will have noticed some kind of dancing rays in a halo around
    that bright point.
    Since this is a biological aberration, a photo lens will not see the
    same at all.

    Giacomo Galla has painted it in the early 20th century:
    http://uploads1.wikipaintings.org/images/giacomo-balla/street-light-1909.jpg!xlMedium.jpg

    Do you know a filter (physical or software) that does the same?

    I'd be glad to know...
    Laszlo
    --
    One computer and three operating systems, not the other way round.
    One wife and many hotels, not the other way round ! ;-)
     
    Laszlo Lebrun, Jun 18, 2013
    #1
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  2. In article <kpqc8g$25v$>,
    Laszlo Lebrun <> wrote:

    > Hi community,
    > have you ever looked into a very bright point?
    > You surely will have noticed some kind of dancing rays in a halo around
    > that bright point.
    > Since this is a biological aberration, a photo lens will not see the
    > same at all.
    >
    > Giacomo Galla has painted it in the early 20th century:
    > http://uploads1.wikipaintings.org/images/giacomo-balla/street-light-1909.jpg!x
    > lMedium.jpg
    >
    > Do you know a filter (physical or software) that does the same?
    >
    > I'd be glad to know...
    > Laszlo


    For software, look for a "diffraction" or "lens flare" filter. For
    hardware, rub a finger on a cheap UV filter and use a small aperture.
    Fine lines of salt and oil will produce those halos from diffraction.
    --
    I will not see posts from Google because I must filter them as spam
     
    Kevin McMurtrie, Jun 19, 2013
    #2
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  3. Laszlo Lebrun

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 18/06/2013 20:26, Laszlo Lebrun wrote:
    > Hi community,
    > have you ever looked into a very bright point?
    > You surely will have noticed some kind of dancing rays in a halo around
    > that bright point.
    > Since this is a biological aberration, a photo lens will not see the
    > same at all.
    >
    > Giacomo Galla has painted it in the early 20th century:
    > http://uploads1.wikipaintings.org/images/giacomo-balla/street-light-1909.jpg!xlMedium.jpg
    >
    >
    > Do you know a filter (physical or software) that does the same?


    One way to do it would be to clip and contrast enhance a copy of the
    source image until only the very brightest pixels are bright and
    everything else is black. Then convolve the image with the pattern that
    you want on your highlights and add that back to the image with a "keep
    brightest" rule. That should give a fair approximation.

    You might also want to look up starburst filters eg.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Starburst-T...922&sr=1-1-fkmr1&keywords=starburst filter 16

    Though you might have to stack more than one to get the effect you seek.
    ISTR they used to do 16 point starburst filters too.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
     
    Martin Brown, Jun 19, 2013
    #3
  4. On 19.06.2013 08:40, Martin Brown wrote:
    > On 18/06/2013 20:26, Laszlo Lebrun wrote:
    >> Hi community,
    >> have you ever looked into a very bright point?
    >> You surely will have noticed some kind of dancing rays in a halo around
    >> that bright point.
    >> Since this is a biological aberration, a photo lens will not see the
    >> same at all.
    >>
    >> Giacomo Galla has painted it in the early 20th century:
    >> http://uploads1.wikipaintings.org/images/giacomo-balla/street-light-1909.jpg!xlMedium.jpg
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Do you know a filter (physical or software) that does the same?

    >
    > One way to do it would be to clip and contrast enhance a copy of the
    > source image until only the very brightest pixels are bright and
    > everything else is black. Then convolve the image with the pattern that
    > you want on your highlights and add that back to the image with a "keep
    > brightest" rule. That should give a fair approximation.
    >

    Sorry, i can't figure that out.

    > You might also want to look up starburst filters eg.
    >
    > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Starburst-T...922&sr=1-1-fkmr1&keywords=starburst filter 16
    >

    Hmm that's not even close to the effect, i've described, a starburst
    filter returns that:
    http://d2icr5g9bedq6k.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/starburst_day.jpg

    >
    > Though you might have to stack more than one to get the effect you seek.
    > ISTR they used to do 16 point starburst filters too.
    >



    --
    One computer and three operating systems, not the other way round.
    One wife and many hotels, not the other way round ! ;-)
     
    Laszlo Lebrun, Jun 19, 2013
    #4
  5. On 19.06.2013 06:32, Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
    > In article <kpqc8g$25v$>,
    > Laszlo Lebrun <> wrote:
    >
    >> Hi community,
    >> have you ever looked into a very bright point?
    >> You surely will have noticed some kind of dancing rays in a halo around
    >> that bright point.
    >> Since this is a biological aberration, a photo lens will not see the
    >> same at all.
    >>
    >> Giacomo Galla has painted it in the early 20th century:
    >> http://uploads1.wikipaintings.org/images/giacomo-balla/street-light-1909.jpg!x
    >> lMedium.jpg
    >>
    >> Do you know a filter (physical or software) that does the same?
    >>
    >> I'd be glad to know...
    >> Laszlo

    >
    > For software, look for a "diffraction" or "lens flare" filter.

    I did, but did not get anything approaching.

    > For
    > hardware, rub a finger on a cheap UV filter and use a small aperture.
    > Fine lines of salt and oil will produce those halos from diffraction.
    >

    Thank you. That's what I used to do in the 70ies to get a "David
    Hamilton effect" with my oooold Pentax.
    That isn't however even slightly close to what I mean here.

    --
    One computer and three operating systems, not the other way round.
    One wife and many hotels, not the other way round ! ;-)
     
    Laszlo Lebrun, Jun 19, 2013
    #5
  6. Laszlo Lebrun

    Me Guest

    On 20/06/2013 12:56 a.m., Laszlo Lebrun wrote:
    > On 19.06.2013 06:32, Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
    >> In article <kpqc8g$25v$>,
    >> Laszlo Lebrun <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hi community,
    >>> have you ever looked into a very bright point?
    >>> You surely will have noticed some kind of dancing rays in a halo around
    >>> that bright point.
    >>> Since this is a biological aberration, a photo lens will not see the
    >>> same at all.
    >>>
    >>> Giacomo Galla has painted it in the early 20th century:
    >>> http://uploads1.wikipaintings.org/images/giacomo-balla/street-light-1909.jpg!x
    >>>
    >>> lMedium.jpg
    >>>
    >>> Do you know a filter (physical or software) that does the same?
    >>>
    >>> I'd be glad to know...
    >>> Laszlo

    >>
    >> For software, look for a "diffraction" or "lens flare" filter.

    > I did, but did not get anything approaching.
    >
    >> For
    >> hardware, rub a finger on a cheap UV filter and use a small aperture.
    >> Fine lines of salt and oil will produce those halos from diffraction.
    >>

    > Thank you. That's what I used to do in the 70ies to get a "David
    > Hamilton effect" with my oooold Pentax.
    > That isn't however even slightly close to what I mean here.
    >

    Was the painter Giacomo Galla - or Giacomo Balla?
    There is apparently something called a "rainbow spot" filter which
    looked like it might be getting close based on the few samples that came
    up on google images, but there's a dearth of information about them.
    I also tried the suggestion, but all I got was soft focus effect, to
    some extent you can affect the radial blur direction. I even tried
    using some transparent silicone grease, but it didn't work.
    A painter may exaggerate an impression based on such aberration - I mean
    really if you were to see exactly what Balla saw when painting that
    picture, you'd be heading straight to the ophthalmologist the following
    morning, unless you knew there was some other cause, such as what could
    be cured by taking a little more care when eating wild mushrooms.
    What might be worth a try is that decorative laser etched (in patterns)
    metalized polyester (mylar) film used for fancy wrapping. The metal
    layer is very thin so transparent and etched finely to cause a
    diffraction effect - I think if you look through the film with your eyes
    you can get a similar effect with bright points of light.
    But in the end software (or a paintbrush) may be the only way.
     
    Me, Jun 19, 2013
    #6
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