Seeking experienced advice:

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by cmyk, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. cmyk

    cmyk Guest

    Hi Ken,

    For what you've described, you really don't need 10-12 megapixels. 4 megapixels is all you'll need for prints of that size - 5
    megapixels will easily give prints up to 6*8in or 6*9in @ 300ppi (depends on the camera's sensor format). The number of megapixels
    has little to do with needing to take photos at close range - that's what the *optical* zoom is for. Ignore digital zoom - it's a
    waste of time.

    Some digital cameras take AA batteries, which gives you a choice of disposable or rechargeable, but most use proprietary
    rechargeable batteries - get a spare.

    Refurbished = 2nd hand. It's your choice. You may get a camera with better resolution/features for a fewer $ that way, but it
    probably won't perform as well as the newer models.

    If you're getting a point&shoot camera (and for $250 that's all you're likely to get), then image stabilisation is almost a
    necessity.

    Storage is cheap - get the largest capacity card you can afford - and a card reader so that you can download the images to your
    computer.

    Cheers
    --
    cmyk


    "Ken" <> wrote in message news:...
    > I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I
    > thought I would see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >
    > I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any suggested merchants?
    >
    > I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.
    >
    > I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I
    > need a lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >
    > I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would probably have a service print them.
    >
    > I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or
    > model is better than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >
    > The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are the way to go. Any comments?
    >
    > I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to buying such a camera?
    >
    > Are there other issues I should be considering such as image stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?
    >
    > Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a
    > camera and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.
     
    cmyk, Mar 12, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. cmyk

    Ken Guest

    I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:

    I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    suggested merchants?

    I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.

    I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.

    I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    probably have a service print them.

    I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is
    better than another, this would be helpful to know.

    The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    the way to go. Any comments?

    I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to
    buying such a camera?

    Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?

    Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.
     
    Ken, Mar 12, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. cmyk

    ray Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 19:11:13 -0600, Ken wrote:

    > I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    > neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    > see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >
    > I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    > suggested merchants?
    >
    > I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    > be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.


    I'm unfamiliar with that terminology - do you mean that you'd like a 10x
    or 12x optical zoom?

    >
    > I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    > possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    > lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >
    > I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    > probably have a service print them.
    >
    > I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    > cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is
    > better than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >
    > The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    > the way to go. Any comments?


    In my experience, if your camera uses AA batteries, then Lithium non-
    rechargeables are the way to go - they last a LONG time.

    >
    > I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to
    > buying such a camera?


    None that I've ever found. I've had three refurbished digital cameras
    (including my current one) several refurbished scanners and printers, and
    never had a problem. The only reason you see 'several' is that I've
    upgraded - every one of them is still functional - in fact I did a shoot
    at the local library for Halowe'en using my old Kodak DC210+ (1.0MP -
    about 10 years old) and it did fine. I've had folks 'in' electronics tell
    me that refurbished is better than new - because when they refurbish they
    totally check out everything.

    >
    > Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    > stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?


    It's good to have with a long zoom.

    >
    > Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    > suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    > and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.


    Suggest you look at the Kodak online store. I'm quite happy with my
    refurb P850 - they are no longer in production, but they show up refurb
    for around $225. You could go a long way with it - it has full manual
    mode as well as full auto, and saves in jpeg, raw, tiff. Nice 12x zoom
    and Electronic ViewFinder with adequate resolution.

    I suggest several one and two gb memory cards - they are quite cheap now
    and a USB card reader.
     
    ray, Mar 12, 2008
    #3
  4. cmyk

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    "Ken" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    > neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    > see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >
    > I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any suggested
    > merchants?
    >
    > I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would be
    > unhappy with only taking photos at close range.
    >
    > I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and possibly
    > some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a lot of mega
    > pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >
    > I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    > probably have a service print them.
    >
    > I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some cameras
    > "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is better
    > than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >
    > The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    > the way to go. Any comments?
    >
    > I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to
    > buying such a camera?
    >
    > Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    > stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?
    >
    > Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to suggest
    > anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera and find
    > out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.


    From what you say, a resolution of 6 megapixels or higher will do quite
    nicely -- no need to get up into the 10 - 12 Mp range.

    Given your budget limits, I'd recommend any of the Canon 'A' series cameras
    you can find in that range -- with the exception of the A460. The A570,
    A580 or A720 in particular are good cameras, and I can give you the thumbs
    up based on my own personal experience.

    As for eating up batteries, they all do. I like the Canon 'A' series
    because 'AA' batteries are used, and rechargeables are readily available, as
    are non-rechargeable alkalines.

    Image stabilization is definitely a good thing, not just for pros.

    Good Luck,
    Dudley
     
    Dudley Hanks, Mar 12, 2008
    #4
  5. Ken <> wrote:
    > I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    >see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >
    > I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >suggested merchants?


    You didn't say where you are living, but B&H in New York will ship worldwide
    expect to Iran, Sudan, or Cuba.

    >I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    >be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.


    No idea what an optical resolution of 10 is supposed to mean.

    >I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    >possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    >lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.


    Anyting in the 6-10MP range will be fine.

    >I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    >cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is
    >better than another, this would be helpful to know.


    Impossible to answer without narrowing down the field first. But yes,
    digital cameras, in particular when used carelessly like not turning off the
    LCD, permanent zooming just for fun, using lots of flash ... can eat
    batteries like crazy. I have heard reports that some people had to switch
    batteries after as few as 50 shots. On average of course they can easily
    last 10-20 times as long, in some cameras with considerate use even much
    longer than that.
    You may also want to check out http://dpreview.com.

    >The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    >the way to go. Any comments?


    Well, non-rechargables are great as backup (they don't self-discharge), but
    used as the main power source will soon cost you more than the camera
    itself.

    >Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?


    Rather the opposite. "Pros" know how to hold a camera steady.
    Aside of that there are many religious believes, like e.g. view finder,
    digital zoom, lens attachments, memory card format, proprietary battery
    format, included software, ..
    ..
    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Mar 12, 2008
    #5
  6. cmyk

    Ken Guest

    cmyk wrote:
    > Hi Ken,
    >
    > For what you've described, you really don't need 10-12 megapixels. 4
    > megapixels is all you'll need for prints of that size - 5 megapixels
    > will easily give prints up to 6*8in or 6*9in @ 300ppi (depends on the
    > camera's sensor format). The number of megapixels has little to do with
    > needing to take photos at close range - that's what the *optical* zoom
    > is for. Ignore digital zoom - it's a waste of time.


    Thanks for your comments. I was thinking the same thing about the
    Megapixels. I thought 5 or 6 should be enough.
    >
    > Some digital cameras take AA batteries, which gives you a choice of
    > disposable or rechargeable, but most use proprietary rechargeable
    > batteries - get a spare.
    >
    > Refurbished = 2nd hand. It's your choice. You may get a camera with
    > better resolution/features for a fewer $ that way, but it probably won't
    > perform as well as the newer models.


    Have you heard of bad experiences with a refurbished one? When you
    talk of "newer ones" I assume you mean newer models? Or did you mean a
    brand new one of the same model?
    >
    > If you're getting a point&shoot camera (and for $250 that's all you're
    > likely to get), then image stabilisation is almost a necessity.


    Any opinion of the Canon SX100? I do not yet have a preference, but it
    seems to fit in the budget and some of the things I THINK I want.
    >
    > Storage is cheap - get the largest capacity card you can afford - and a
    > card reader so that you can download the images to your computer.
    >
    > Cheers

    Thanks for your comments.
     
    Ken, Mar 12, 2008
    #6
  7. cmyk

    Ken Guest

    ray wrote:
    > On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 19:11:13 -0600, Ken wrote:
    >
    >> I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >> neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    >> see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >>
    >> I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >> suggested merchants?
    >>
    >> I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    >> be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.

    >
    > I'm unfamiliar with that terminology - do you mean that you'd like a 10x
    > or 12x optical zoom?


    Yes, I should have said optical zoom I guess. That shows you how much
    I know about cameras.

    >
    >> I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    >> possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    >> lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >>
    >> I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    >> probably have a service print them.
    >>
    >> I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    >> cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is
    >> better than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >>
    >> The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    >> the way to go. Any comments?

    >
    > In my experience, if your camera uses AA batteries, then Lithium non-
    > rechargeables are the way to go - they last a LONG time.


    You recommend Lithium non-rechargeable? Doesn't it get expensive
    versus a rechargeable battery? Again, I do NOT know. I am simply
    seeking advice from someone who does.

    >
    >> I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to
    >> buying such a camera?

    >
    > None that I've ever found. I've had three refurbished digital cameras
    > (including my current one) several refurbished scanners and printers, and
    > never had a problem. The only reason you see 'several' is that I've
    > upgraded - every one of them is still functional - in fact I did a shoot
    > at the local library for Halowe'en using my old Kodak DC210+ (1.0MP -
    > about 10 years old) and it did fine. I've had folks 'in' electronics tell
    > me that refurbished is better than new - because when they refurbish they
    > totally check out everything.


    Interesting. I shall keep that in mind.
    >
    >> Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >> stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?

    >
    > It's good to have with a long zoom.


    So the greater magnification makes this more useful? Good to know.
    >
    >> Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    >> suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    >> and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.

    >
    > Suggest you look at the Kodak online store. I'm quite happy with my
    > refurb P850 - they are no longer in production, but they show up refurb
    > for around $225. You could go a long way with it - it has full manual
    > mode as well as full auto, and saves in jpeg, raw, tiff. Nice 12x zoom
    > and Electronic ViewFinder with adequate resolution.


    Is it difficult to use the LCD for a viewfinder? Or is a camera with a
    true viewfinder a worthwhile feature?
    >
    > I suggest several one and two gb memory cards - they are quite cheap now
    > and a USB card reader.


    Thanks.
     
    Ken, Mar 12, 2008
    #7
  8. cmyk

    Ken Guest

    Dudley Hanks wrote:
    > "Ken" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >> neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    >> see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >>
    >> I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any suggested
    >> merchants?
    >>
    >> I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would be
    >> unhappy with only taking photos at close range.
    >>
    >> I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and possibly
    >> some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a lot of mega
    >> pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >>
    >> I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    >> probably have a service print them.
    >>
    >> I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some cameras
    >> "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is better
    >> than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >>
    >> The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    >> the way to go. Any comments?
    >>
    >> I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to
    >> buying such a camera?
    >>
    >> Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >> stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?
    >>
    >> Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to suggest
    >> anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera and find
    >> out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.

    >
    > From what you say, a resolution of 6 megapixels or higher will do quite
    > nicely -- no need to get up into the 10 - 12 Mp range.
    >
    > Given your budget limits, I'd recommend any of the Canon 'A' series cameras
    > you can find in that range -- with the exception of the A460. The A570,
    > A580 or A720 in particular are good cameras, and I can give you the thumbs
    > up based on my own personal experience.
    >
    > As for eating up batteries, they all do. I like the Canon 'A' series
    > because 'AA' batteries are used, and rechargeables are readily available, as
    > are non-rechargeable alkalines.


    Good to know. I shall look at that series and watch for the AA batteries.

    >
    > Image stabilization is definitely a good thing, not just for pros.
    >
    > Good Luck,
    > Dudley
    >
    >

    Thanks.
     
    Ken, Mar 12, 2008
    #8
  9. cmyk

    Ken Guest

    Jürgen Exner wrote:
    > Ken <> wrote:
    >> I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >> neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    >> see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >>
    >> I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >> suggested merchants?

    >
    > You didn't say where you are living, but B&H in New York will ship worldwide
    > expect to Iran, Sudan, or Cuba.


    Fly-over country. USA.
    >
    >> I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    >> be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.

    >
    > No idea what an optical resolution of 10 is supposed to mean.


    Magnification is what I meant I guess.
    >
    >> I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    >> possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    >> lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.

    >
    > Anyting in the 6-10MP range will be fine.
    >
    >> I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    >> cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is
    >> better than another, this would be helpful to know.

    >
    > Impossible to answer without narrowing down the field first. But yes,
    > digital cameras, in particular when used carelessly like not turning off the
    > LCD, permanent zooming just for fun, using lots of flash ... can eat
    > batteries like crazy. I have heard reports that some people had to switch
    > batteries after as few as 50 shots. On average of course they can easily
    > last 10-20 times as long, in some cameras with considerate use even much
    > longer than that.


    So it is more the how the person uses the camera rather than how the
    camera is made that determines battery life?

    > You may also want to check out http://dpreview.com.


    Thanks for the link, I shall review it.
    >
    >> The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    >> the way to go. Any comments?

    >
    > Well, non-rechargables are great as backup (they don't self-discharge), but
    > used as the main power source will soon cost you more than the camera
    > itself.
    >
    >> Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >> stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?

    >
    > Rather the opposite. "Pros" know how to hold a camera steady.
    > Aside of that there are many religious believes, like e.g. view finder,
    > digital zoom, lens attachments, memory card format, proprietary battery
    > format, included software, ..
    > .
    > jue
     
    Ken, Mar 12, 2008
    #9
  10. cmyk

    cmyk Guest

    "Ken" <> wrote in message news:...
    > cmyk wrote:
    >> Hi Ken,
    >>
    >> For what you've described, you really don't need 10-12 megapixels. 4 megapixels is all you'll need for prints of that size - 5
    >> megapixels will easily give prints up to 6*8in or 6*9in @ 300ppi (depends on the camera's sensor format). The number of
    >> megapixels has little to do with needing to take photos at close range - that's what the *optical* zoom is for. Ignore digital
    >> zoom - it's a waste of time.

    >
    > Thanks for your comments. I was thinking the same thing about the Megapixels. I thought 5 or 6 should be enough.


    In that case, I suppose the 10-12 referred to the amount of zoom. That limits your choices quite a bit and, to some extent, getting
    a camera with more megapixels can make up for a lack of zoom (you can simple crop away more of what you want to exclude).

    >>
    >> Some digital cameras take AA batteries, which gives you a choice of disposable or rechargeable, but most use proprietary
    >> rechargeable batteries - get a spare.


    With the proprietary batteries, they're almost always of the Li-on type. In my experience these are much better performers than the
    NiMh or alkaline AA batteries, and they recharge much faster than NiMh batteries too.

    >>
    >> Refurbished = 2nd hand. It's your choice. You may get a camera with better resolution/features for a fewer $ that way, but it
    >> probably won't perform as well as the newer models.

    >
    > Have you heard of bad experiences with a refurbished one? When you talk of "newer ones" I assume you mean newer models? Or did
    > you mean a brand new one of the same model?


    I've no experience with refurbished cameras. And yes, I was referring to newer models.

    >>
    >> If you're getting a point&shoot camera (and for $250 that's all you're likely to get), then image stabilisation is almost a
    >> necessity.

    >
    > Any opinion of the Canon SX100? I do not yet have a preference, but it seems to fit in the budget and some of the things I THINK
    > I want.


    No idea. My wife has a Ricoh Caplio R7 (8MP, &X Optical zoom and stabilisation). It takes great pics and is so small you can carry
    it around in a shirt pocket.

    >>
    >> Storage is cheap - get the largest capacity card you can afford - and a card reader so that you can download the images to your
    >> computer.
    >>
    >> Cheers

    > Thanks for your comments.


    You're welcome.

    Cheers
    --
    cmyk
     
    cmyk, Mar 12, 2008
    #10
  11. cmyk

    Martin Brown Guest

    In message <>, Ken
    <> writes
    > I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I
    >would see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >
    > I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >suggested merchants?
    >
    >I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    >be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.


    Requiring a 10-12x optical zoom already narrows the field to only a
    handful of cameras in that price range. 3-4x zoom offers a wider choice.
    >
    >I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    >possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    >lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >
    >I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    >probably have a service print them.
    >
    >I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    >cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model
    >is better than another, this would be helpful to know.


    Older cameras used to hammer batteries into the ground. Modern ones are
    more forgiving unless you take a lot of flash shots.
    >
    >The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries
    >are the way to go. Any comments?


    NiMH or even better are Li-ion rechargables (although the latter tend to
    be in custom packaging for a specific camera) which hold more charge and
    last longer. NiCds are a bit of a disaster in most digicams.
    >
    >I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside
    >to buying such a camera?
    >
    >Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?


    Image stabilisation is probably more use to someone not used to holding
    a camera really steady. Also be sure to try out the camera for handling.
    It is no use buying something that is perfect on paper but impossible to
    use because of fiddly miniature controls with impossibly small buttons
    and a perverse menu driven GUI that takes forever to reach the most
    commonly used options.
    >
    >Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    >suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    >and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.


    One thing to think about is do you want a camera to always have with you
    and will fit in a shirt pocket? If so some of the Canon Ixus are worth
    considering or is the wide zoom really important in which case Panasonic
    TZ3 (maybe outside your price range).

    Regards,
    --
    Martin Brown

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Martin Brown, Mar 12, 2008
    #11
  12. cmyk

    ray Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 21:25:22 -0600, Ken wrote:

    > ray wrote:
    >> On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 19:11:13 -0600, Ken wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >>> neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I
    >>> would see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >>>
    >>> I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >>> suggested merchants?
    >>>
    >>> I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I
    >>> would be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.

    >>
    >> I'm unfamiliar with that terminology - do you mean that you'd like a
    >> 10x or 12x optical zoom?

    >
    > Yes, I should have said optical zoom I guess. That shows you how

    much
    > I know about cameras.
    >
    >
    >>> I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    >>> possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need
    >>> a lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >>>
    >>> I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    >>> probably have a service print them.
    >>>
    >>> I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    >>> cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model
    >>> is better than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >>>
    >>> The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries
    >>> are the way to go. Any comments?

    >>
    >> In my experience, if your camera uses AA batteries, then Lithium non-
    >> rechargeables are the way to go - they last a LONG time.

    >
    > You recommend Lithium non-rechargeable? Doesn't it get expensive
    > versus a rechargeable battery? Again, I do NOT know. I am simply
    > seeking advice from someone who does.


    Actually, it's not that expensive because they last a LONG time. They are
    particularly good if you don't shoot that often. My wife uses them in her
    nikon coolpix 2100 - she may go several months without shooting, and it's
    always ready.

    >
    >
    >>> I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside
    >>> to buying such a camera?

    >>
    >> None that I've ever found. I've had three refurbished digital cameras
    >> (including my current one) several refurbished scanners and printers,
    >> and never had a problem. The only reason you see 'several' is that I've
    >> upgraded - every one of them is still functional - in fact I did a
    >> shoot at the local library for Halowe'en using my old Kodak DC210+
    >> (1.0MP - about 10 years old) and it did fine. I've had folks 'in'
    >> electronics tell me that refurbished is better than new - because when
    >> they refurbish they totally check out everything.

    >
    > Interesting. I shall keep that in mind.
    >>
    >>> Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >>> stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?

    >>
    >> It's good to have with a long zoom.

    >
    > So the greater magnification makes this more useful? Good to

    know.

    That is it's main use. If you're shooting without much magnification at a
    decent shutter speed (say about 1/30th or faster) then it does little for
    you. I have some handheld shots I've taken at full zoom (400mm
    equivalent) that don't exhibit any shake.

    >>
    >>> Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    >>> suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    >>> and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.

    >>
    >> Suggest you look at the Kodak online store. I'm quite happy with my
    >> refurb P850 - they are no longer in production, but they show up refurb
    >> for around $225. You could go a long way with it - it has full manual
    >> mode as well as full auto, and saves in jpeg, raw, tiff. Nice 12x zoom
    >> and Electronic ViewFinder with adequate resolution.

    >
    > Is it difficult to use the LCD for a viewfinder? Or is a camera

    with a
    > true viewfinder a worthwhile feature?


    I abhor backpanel LCDs - I cannot see how folks stand to use them. With
    an EVF, you have a real viewfinder - it is simply electronic - it shows
    you what the sensor sees - much like the viewfinder on a SLR camera. The
    only caveat is that some long zoom cameras have only about 110k pixels in
    the EVF - to me they are unacceptably 'blocky'. With about 220k pixels as
    in the Kodak P series, it is very usable. You won't find many digial
    cameras with good optical viewfinders unless you go to DSLR.

    >>
    >> I suggest several one and two gb memory cards - they are quite cheap
    >> now and a USB card reader.

    >
    > Thanks.


    You're welcome.
     
    ray, Mar 12, 2008
    #12
  13. On Mar 11, 10:15 pm, Ken <> wrote:
    me.
    >
    > Thanks for your comments. I was thinking the same thing about the
    > Megapixels. I thought 5 or 6 should be enough.
    >
    >

    Trouble is, you never know when you don't have enough zoom, and will
    have to crop, or when you shoot a super shot and will want a larger
    print. So buy as many pixels as you can afford, consistant with other
    factors.

    If you are serious enough to be participating in this group, you may
    want, in the future, to do a lot of manual settings for better
    control. So make sure you can manually set exposure, or at least do
    exposure compensation or aperture/speed priority.

    This is a personal bias, but I tend to favor the older companies who
    have long built cameras, rather than an electronics company getting
    into the business. However, Sony in particular does seem to make some
    excellent cameras.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Mar 12, 2008
    #13
  14. cmyk

    Ken Guest

    Martin Brown wrote:
    > In message <>, Ken
    > <> writes
    >> I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >> neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I
    >> would see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >>
    >> I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >> suggested merchants?
    >>
    >> I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I
    >> would be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.

    >
    > Requiring a 10-12x optical zoom already narrows the field to only a
    > handful of cameras in that price range. 3-4x zoom offers a wider choice.
    >>
    >> I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    >> possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need
    >> a lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >>
    >> I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    >> probably have a service print them.
    >>
    >> I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    >> cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model
    >> is better than another, this would be helpful to know.

    >
    > Older cameras used to hammer batteries into the ground. Modern ones are
    > more forgiving unless you take a lot of flash shots.
    >>
    >> The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries
    >> are the way to go. Any comments?

    >
    > NiMH or even better are Li-ion rechargables (although the latter tend to
    > be in custom packaging for a specific camera) which hold more charge and
    > last longer. NiCds are a bit of a disaster in most digicams.
    >>
    >> I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside
    >> to buying such a camera?
    >>
    >> Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >> stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?

    >
    > Image stabilisation is probably more use to someone not used to holding
    > a camera really steady. Also be sure to try out the camera for handling.
    > It is no use buying something that is perfect on paper but impossible to
    > use because of fiddly miniature controls with impossibly small buttons
    > and a perverse menu driven GUI that takes forever to reach the most
    > commonly used options.
    >>
    >> Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    >> suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    >> and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.

    >
    > One thing to think about is do you want a camera to always have with you
    > and will fit in a shirt pocket? If so some of the Canon Ixus are worth
    > considering or is the wide zoom really important in which case Panasonic
    > TZ3 (maybe outside your price range).
    >
    > Regards,


    Thanks for your comments. I am thinking about the Canon SX100 camera.
    Do you have any opinion?? I have read much about the battery life
    being short on this camera, but this camera takes two batteries and many
    others take four. I would think that this fact might make the user
    believe the battery life is much shorter.

    As for the size, I did consider that factor but I thought I would long
    for the ability to take pictures further away if I bought one that fit
    into the pocket with perhaps 3X optical magnification. I do wish it the
    SX100 had a viewfinder, but I guess all of life is a trade off.

    Many have commented on the NiMH batteries and a charger but it is a
    little confusing with different MA ratings and discharge rates. Do you
    have a specific size or brand battery and charger you use? A source
    would be nice also as I see the prices vary wildly.
     
    Ken, Mar 14, 2008
    #14
  15. cmyk

    Martin Brown Guest

    In message <>, Ken
    <> writes
    >Martin Brown wrote:
    >> In message <>, Ken
    >><> writes
    >>> I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I
    >>>am neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I
    >>>would see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >>>
    >>> I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >>>suggested merchants?
    >>>
    >>> I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I
    >>>would be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.

    >> Requiring a 10-12x optical zoom already narrows the field to only a
    >>handful of cameras in that price range. 3-4x zoom offers a wider choice.

    [Snip]
    >> One thing to think about is do you want a camera to always have with
    >>you and will fit in a shirt pocket? If so some of the Canon Ixus are
    >>worth considering or is the wide zoom really important in which case
    >>Panasonic TZ3 (maybe outside your price range).
    >> Regards,

    >
    > Thanks for your comments. I am thinking about the Canon SX100
    >camera. Do you have any opinion?? I have read much about the battery
    >life being short on this camera, but this camera takes two batteries
    >and many others take four. I would think that this fact might make the
    >user believe the battery life is much shorter.


    Reviewers do seem to think that it eats batteries. I haven't used one.
    At least with AA cells you can buy them easily if needed. The Canon Ixus
    are nice cameras though. And the Panasonic TZ3 I mentioned is almost
    pocketable (so much so that it may tempt me away from the Canon Ixus
    family).
    >
    > As for the size, I did consider that factor but I thought I
    >would long for the ability to take pictures further away if I bought
    >one that fit into the pocket with perhaps 3X optical magnification. I
    >do wish it the SX100 had a viewfinder, but I guess all of life is a
    >trade off.


    I find lack of a viewfinder annoying since I am used to one. But you can
    live without one. Main problem is out in bright sunlight where the LCD
    display may be almost invisible.
    >
    > Many have commented on the NiMH batteries and a charger but it
    >is a little confusing with different MA ratings and discharge rates.
    >Do you have a specific size or brand battery and charger you use? A
    >source would be nice also as I see the prices vary wildly.


    I would not recommend the charger that I own. It is headed for the
    dustbin just as soon as I find a better one. Any decent brand of NiMH
    batteries with the highest MAh rating should be OK, but bear in mind
    that the more expensive dedicated rechargeable Li-ion batteries in some
    compacts are even better.

    Regards,
    --
    Martin Brown

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Martin Brown, Mar 14, 2008
    #15
  16. cmyk

    Ken Guest

    Ken wrote:
    > I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    > neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    > see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >
    > I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    > suggested merchants?
    >
    > I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    > be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.
    >
    > I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    > possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    > lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >
    > I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    > probably have a service print them.
    >
    > I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    > cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is
    > better than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >
    > The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    > the way to go. Any comments?
    >
    > I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to
    > buying such a camera?
    >
    > Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    > stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?
    >
    > Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    > suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    > and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.



    Thanks to all who commented, I have purchased a Kodak Z812 IS. I hope I
    did the right thing, but I now know more than when I first posted. Time
    will tell if I did the right thing.
     
    Ken, Mar 15, 2008
    #16
  17. cmyk

    ray Guest

    On Fri, 14 Mar 2008 18:11:12 -0600, Ken wrote:

    > Ken wrote:
    >> I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    >> neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I
    >> would see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    >>
    >> I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    >> suggested merchants?
    >>
    >> I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    >> be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.
    >>
    >> I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    >> possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    >> lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    >>
    >> I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    >> probably have a service print them.
    >>
    >> I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    >> cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model
    >> is better than another, this would be helpful to know.
    >>
    >> The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries
    >> are the way to go. Any comments?
    >>
    >> I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside
    >> to buying such a camera?
    >>
    >> Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    >> stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?
    >>
    >> Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    >> suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    >> and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.

    >
    >
    > Thanks to all who commented, I have purchased a Kodak Z812 IS. I hope I
    > did the right thing, but I now know more than when I first posted. Time
    > will tell if I did the right thing.


    Hope it works out for you, let us know.
     
    ray, Mar 15, 2008
    #17
  18. cmyk

    John Turco Guest

    Ken wrote:
    >
    > Ken wrote:
    > > I am planning on purchasing my first digital camera, and since I am
    > > neither a photography expert nor intend to become one, I thought I would
    > > see what others thought I should buy. All comments are welcome:
    > >
    > > I would hope to purchase the camera for less than $250. Any
    > > suggested merchants?
    > >
    > > I believe I want an optical resolution of 10 or 12 since I feel I would
    > > be unhappy with only taking photos at close range.
    > >
    > > I do not intend to do anything other than family type photos and
    > > possibly some landscape shots. Based upon this, I don't THINK I need a
    > > lot of mega pixels. Most would never be printed larger than 5x7.
    > >
    > > I do not intend to print my own photos. If I wanted a print I would
    > > probably have a service print them.
    > >
    > > I have read some reviews about digital cameras and it appears some
    > > cameras "eat batteries." If this is an issue, and one brand or model is
    > > better than another, this would be helpful to know.
    > >
    > > The majority of comments seem to suggest that rechargeable batteries are
    > > the way to go. Any comments?
    > >
    > > I see some models for sale that are refurbished. Is there a downside to
    > > buying such a camera?
    > >
    > > Are there other issues I should be considering such as image
    > > stabilization? Or is that feature just for pros?
    > >
    > > Brand reliability? Needed memory card size? Please feel free to
    > > suggest anything I did not mention. I just don't want to buy a camera
    > > and find out I should have asked more questions. Thanks.

    >
    > Thanks to all who commented, I have purchased a Kodak Z812 IS. I hope I
    > did the right thing, but I now know more than when I first posted. Time
    > will tell if I did the right thing.



    Hello, Ken:

    You've made a very wise decision, I believe. The Z812 IS, is rather similar to my
    P850, which is an older (and since discontinued) Kodak model; this high quality,
    handsome and tastefully styled camera should fulfill all of your requirements,
    quite adequately.

    Also, here's a glowing report, on the digicam in question:

    Digital Camera Review.com - Kodak EasyShare Z812 IS Review
    Submitted by Howard Creech on Monday, October 29, 2007
    <http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/default.asp?newsID=3209&review=kodak+easyshare+z812+IS>

    Good luck and happy snapping!


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Mar 19, 2008
    #18
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Timothy Lee

    Problems experienced from Windows update?

    Timothy Lee, Aug 31, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    514
  2. Paul Tutle Sr. - OCC

    Any experienced incredimail tech people on here?

    Paul Tutle Sr. - OCC, Oct 23, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    3,488
    John Holmes
    Apr 28, 2006
  3. Soul
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    333
    Marvin Margoshes
    Oct 5, 2003
  4. Peter Briggs
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    627
    Brockhurst Pertwee
    Sep 24, 2003
  5. Goro
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,303
    Haans
    Feb 13, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page