Seeking Advice on Digital SLR

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by BRH, Jul 8, 2006.

  1. BRH

    BRH Guest

    Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price, I'm
    thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.

    So, I'm looking for recommendations as to which current digital SLR's
    meet this requirement. If there are more than one, any comments on
    their relative merits would be greatly appreciated. Also, any links to
    either online sources or reviews would be helpful.

    Thanks!
    BRH, Jul 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. BRH

    Lourens Smak Guest

    In article <>, BRH <BRH>
    wrote:

    > Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    > a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price, I'm
    > thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    > lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.
    >
    > So, I'm looking for recommendations as to which current digital SLR's
    > meet this requirement. If there are more than one, any comments on
    > their relative merits would be greatly appreciated. Also, any links to
    > either online sources or reviews would be helpful.


    There are none. Your camera is too old, Minolta switched to a different
    lensmount in 1985 or so, when auto-focus was introduced. The new (not
    yet available, at least where I live) Sony DSLR will take "old" minolta
    lenses, though not your "even older" ones...

    My advice: Ebay the Minolta stuff (or maybe keep it...you you won't be
    using it much though) and get an Olympus E-500 dual-zoom kit. A great
    starter-set by any standard, great value for money, and you have a 28 to
    300mm (equivalent) outfit instantly. If you have been happy with a XGM
    for the past 25 years, there's no need to buy a more expensive model.

    Lourens
    Lourens Smak, Jul 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. BRH

    SMS Guest

    BRH wrote:
    > Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    > a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price, I'm
    > thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    > lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.


    You can do this with an adapter, and a Konica-Minolta D-SLR (or the new
    Sony D-SLR):

    See
    "http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180003653660&ssPageName=MERC_VIC_ReBay_Pr2_PcY_BIN_IT"

    Practically speaking, you're probably better off not buying a
    Konica-Minolta-Sony D-SLR.

    Choose Nikon or Canon, and make a clean break.
    SMS, Jul 8, 2006
    #3
  4. BRH

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    In article <44b02fdc$0$96178$>,
    SMS <> wrote:

    > BRH wrote:
    > > Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    > > a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price, I'm
    > > thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    > > lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.

    >
    > You can do this with an adapter, and a Konica-Minolta D-SLR (or the new
    > Sony D-SLR):
    >
    > See
    > "http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180003653660&ssPageName=ME
    > RC_VIC_ReBay_Pr2_PcY_BIN_IT"
    >
    > Practically speaking, you're probably better off not buying a
    > Konica-Minolta-Sony D-SLR.
    >
    > Choose Nikon or Canon, and make a clean break.


    I agree. Selecting a dSLR just to continue using some old lenses makes
    no sense. Modern lenses will allow the OP to utilize his new dSLR more
    effectively, be it a Nikon or Canon.
    Shawn Hirn, Jul 9, 2006
    #4
  5. BRH

    J. Clarke Guest

    Shawn Hirn wrote:

    > In article <44b02fdc$0$96178$>,
    > SMS <> wrote:
    >
    >> BRH wrote:
    >> > Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    >> > a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price,
    >> > I'm
    >> > thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    >> > lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.

    >>
    >> You can do this with an adapter, and a Konica-Minolta D-SLR (or the new
    >> Sony D-SLR):
    >>
    >> See
    >>

    "http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180003653660&ssPageName=ME
    >> RC_VIC_ReBay_Pr2_PcY_BIN_IT"
    >>
    >> Practically speaking, you're probably better off not buying a
    >> Konica-Minolta-Sony D-SLR.
    >>
    >> Choose Nikon or Canon, and make a clean break.

    >
    > I agree. Selecting a dSLR just to continue using some old lenses makes
    > no sense. Modern lenses will allow the OP to utilize his new dSLR more
    > effectively, be it a Nikon or Canon.


    Good strategy for someone with a big budget. Replacing a good set of lenses
    can be very costly.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Jul 9, 2006
    #5
  6. BRH

    bmoag Guest

    The marketplace for dSLRs is evolving rapidly with old names exiting and new
    ones entering as well as ongoing technological evolution.
    Canon and Nikon are known entities and when the dust settles they will
    hopefully survive but they will be joined by other credible name brands.
    With Nkon in particular Sony is a major electronic supplier; to dismiss the
    new Sony/Minolta is also to dismiss Nikon. I do not believe there is much
    difference in the basic innards between the two brands. Nikon however has
    been ahead of Minolta and light years ahead of Sony in the software
    engineered into the cameras and in the control systems designed for use by
    experienced photographers. This will change however over time: Sony will get
    better. What if Sony refuses to supply Nikon in the future?
    Pentax may or may not get a technical boost by linking with Samsung: it
    remains to be seen whether Samsung will become a major player in developing
    its own sensors and electronics. At the moment the Pentax lens line-up
    probably has the best price/performance ratio of any manufacturer. There are
    a number of overpriced dogs in the Nikon/Canon lens kennel.
    Panasonic/Leica cannot be dismissed out of hand although it remains to be
    seen if the Leica badge on their lenses is merely window dressing.
    Whither Olympus in all this? I do not think the 4/3 system is sustainable in
    the long term. If the market moves toward full frame sensors how will
    Olympus compete? Can they afford to bring out an entire new line of lenses
    and cameras? Probably not.
    bmoag, Jul 9, 2006
    #6
  7. BRH

    BRH Guest

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > Shawn Hirn wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article <44b02fdc$0$96178$>,
    >> SMS <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>BRH wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    >>>>a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price,
    >>>>I'm
    >>>>thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    >>>>lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.
    >>>
    >>>You can do this with an adapter, and a Konica-Minolta D-SLR (or the new
    >>>Sony D-SLR):
    >>>
    >>>See
    >>>

    >
    > "http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180003653660&ssPageName=ME
    >
    >>>RC_VIC_ReBay_Pr2_PcY_BIN_IT"
    >>>
    >>>Practically speaking, you're probably better off not buying a
    >>>Konica-Minolta-Sony D-SLR.
    >>>
    >>>Choose Nikon or Canon, and make a clean break.

    >>
    >>I agree. Selecting a dSLR just to continue using some old lenses makes
    >>no sense. Modern lenses will allow the OP to utilize his new dSLR more
    >>effectively, be it a Nikon or Canon.

    >
    >
    > Good strategy for someone with a big budget. Replacing a good set of lenses
    > can be very costly.
    >


    Thanks for all the comments, guys.

    So, if I make a clean break, what specific digital models (preferably
    with multiple lenses) would you recommend for someone just getting back
    into using an SLR again? Please note that the budget is not unlimited.

    Thanks!
    BRH, Jul 9, 2006
    #7
  8. BRH

    J. Clarke Guest

    BRH <BRH> wrote:

    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >> Shawn Hirn wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>In article <44b02fdc$0$96178$>,
    >>> SMS <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>BRH wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    >>>>>a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price,
    >>>>>I'm
    >>>>>thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    >>>>>lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.
    >>>>
    >>>>You can do this with an adapter, and a Konica-Minolta D-SLR (or the new
    >>>>Sony D-SLR):
    >>>>
    >>>>See
    >>>>

    >>
    >>

    "http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180003653660&ssPageName=ME
    >>
    >>>>RC_VIC_ReBay_Pr2_PcY_BIN_IT"
    >>>>
    >>>>Practically speaking, you're probably better off not buying a
    >>>>Konica-Minolta-Sony D-SLR.
    >>>>
    >>>>Choose Nikon or Canon, and make a clean break.
    >>>
    >>>I agree. Selecting a dSLR just to continue using some old lenses makes
    >>>no sense. Modern lenses will allow the OP to utilize his new dSLR more
    >>>effectively, be it a Nikon or Canon.

    >>
    >>
    >> Good strategy for someone with a big budget. Replacing a good set of
    >> lenses can be very costly.
    >>

    >
    > Thanks for all the comments, guys.
    >
    > So, if I make a clean break, what specific digital models (preferably
    > with multiple lenses) would you recommend for someone just getting back
    > into using an SLR again? Please note that the budget is not unlimited.


    Personally my recommendation would be to go with whichever Canon you can
    afford (the Digital Rebel XT works very nicely and is inexpensive, but some
    people don't like the feel of it, the 30D is more capable but also costs a
    good bit more), whatever lens you feel you'll use the most, and get an
    adapter to use your existing lenses, that way you won't have to replace the
    whole system in one lump--you'll be able to do it a piece at a time without
    losing a lot of capability in the meantime.

    Nikon is IMO better value in terms of capability vs cost, but you'd have to
    replace all your existing lenses to get back to equivalent capability.


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Jul 9, 2006
    #8
  9. BRH

    Paul J Gans Guest

    J. Clarke <> wrote:
    >Shawn Hirn wrote:


    >> In article <44b02fdc$0$96178$>,
    >> SMS <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> BRH wrote:
    >>> > Many years ago, I used a Minolta XGM SLR camera, for which I still have
    >>> > a number of lenses. Now that Digital SLR's have come down in price,
    >>> > I'm
    >>> > thinking of buying one. However, I would like to continue to use the
    >>> > lenses that fit the Minolta XGM.
    >>>
    >>> You can do this with an adapter, and a Konica-Minolta D-SLR (or the new
    >>> Sony D-SLR):
    >>>
    >>> See
    >>>

    >"http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180003653660&ssPageName=ME
    >>> RC_VIC_ReBay_Pr2_PcY_BIN_IT"
    >>>
    >>> Practically speaking, you're probably better off not buying a
    >>> Konica-Minolta-Sony D-SLR.
    >>>
    >>> Choose Nikon or Canon, and make a clean break.

    >>
    >> I agree. Selecting a dSLR just to continue using some old lenses makes
    >> no sense. Modern lenses will allow the OP to utilize his new dSLR more
    >> effectively, be it a Nikon or Canon.


    >Good strategy for someone with a big budget. Replacing a good set of lenses
    >can be very costly.


    I agree. The best strategy depends on the intended use,
    exactly which lenses the OP has, and which features will
    be lost by using older lenses.

    I don't think there are any hard and fast rules.

    ---- Paul J. Gans
    Paul J Gans, Jul 9, 2006
    #9
  10. BRH

    SMS Guest

    J. Clarke wrote:

    > Personally my recommendation would be to go with whichever Canon you can
    > afford (the Digital Rebel XT works very nicely and is inexpensive, but some
    > people don't like the feel of it, the 30D is more capable but also costs a
    > good bit more), whatever lens you feel you'll use the most, and get an
    > adapter to use your existing lenses, that way you won't have to replace the
    > whole system in one lump--you'll be able to do it a piece at a time without
    > losing a lot of capability in the meantime.


    AFAIK, there is no adapter available for the MC/MD lenses, except to the
    Konica-Minolta D-SLRs.
    SMS, Jul 10, 2006
    #10
  11. BRH

    J. Clarke Guest

    SMS wrote:

    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >
    >> Personally my recommendation would be to go with whichever Canon you can
    >> afford (the Digital Rebel XT works very nicely and is inexpensive, but
    >> some people don't like the feel of it, the 30D is more capable but also
    >> costs a good bit more), whatever lens you feel you'll use the most, and
    >> get an adapter to use your existing lenses, that way you won't have to
    >> replace the whole system in one lump--you'll be able to do it a piece at
    >> a time without losing a lot of capability in the meantime.

    >
    > AFAIK, there is no adapter available for the MC/MD lenses, except to the
    > Konica-Minolta D-SLRs.


    My apologies, it's the 4/3 system for which the MC/MD adapter is available.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Jul 10, 2006
    #11
  12. BRH

    SMS Guest

    Lourens Smak wrote:

    > My advice: Ebay the Minolta stuff (or maybe keep it...you you won't be
    > using it much though) and get an Olympus E-500 dual-zoom kit. A great
    > starter-set by any standard, great value for money, and you have a 28 to
    > 300mm (equivalent) outfit instantly. If you have been happy with a XGM
    > for the past 25 years, there's no need to buy a more expensive model.


    The E-500 is okay, but there's no upgrade path available should the user
    ever want to move beyond the amateur level. It's also noisier than the
    competition, only has three focus points, and doesn't have some crucial
    accessories available for it. They forgot an LCD for the top of the
    camera, and they forgot USB 2.0 high speed.
    SMS, Jul 10, 2006
    #12
  13. BRH

    Lourens Guest

    In article <44b26dd9$0$96241$>,
    SMS <> wrote:

    > Lourens Smak wrote:
    >
    > > My advice: Ebay the Minolta stuff (or maybe keep it...you you won't be
    > > using it much though) and get an Olympus E-500 dual-zoom kit. A great
    > > starter-set by any standard, great value for money, and you have a 28 to
    > > 300mm (equivalent) outfit instantly. If you have been happy with a XGM
    > > for the past 25 years, there's no need to buy a more expensive model.

    >
    > The E-500 is okay, but there's no upgrade path available should the user
    > ever want to move beyond the amateur level.


    Well he is using a 25-year old XGM at the moment...isn't that a clue?
    Buying an E500 doesn't mean one is marrying Olympus...

    > It's also noisier than the
    > competition,


    First, that depends a lot on who does the measuring, it seems... I am a
    professional, I use Olympus, and I ADD noise to some of my iso-100
    images, because it can make them look better in print, in specific
    cases. In reality noise is a total non-issue except for those that are
    not exposing right on a regular basis.

    (and grain will probably even be "en vogue" in a year or so, in
    professional photography, when people are tired of the smooth&soft Canon
    look. Mark my words...)

    > only has three focus points, and doesn't have some crucial
    > accessories available for it. They forgot an LCD for the top of the
    > camera, and they forgot USB 2.0 high speed.


    Well, it does have a fisheye available for it, and an F/2.8 superwide,
    and you can actually changes lenses with it when you want to (or even
    NEED to). Each system has it's own benefits and drawbacks. Many people
    buy a Canon because of the huge lens-range but end up using some crappy
    Sigma f4-5.6 wideangle. It makes me laugh... just as people doing
    "travel" photography professionally while trying to carry 30kg of gear.

    This could have been taken with a Nikon or a Canon:
    http://www.myfourthirds.com/document.php?id=25836
    but the reality is that nobody cares, as long as it looks good.
    (note the original image was taken @ iso 400.)

    Lourens
    Lourens, Jul 10, 2006
    #13
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