See how smart you are...

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by Marko, Jul 23, 2003.

  1. Marko

    Marko Guest

    In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    know how to deal with this problem.

    If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    just surprises me that very few seem to know how.

    Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    unlikely to get the answer).

    How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    assume that you cannot do this.
     
    Marko, Jul 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. Marko

    Tron2003 Guest

    Homo!!


    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > know how to deal with this problem.
    >
    > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    >
    > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > unlikely to get the answer).
    >
    > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > assume that you cannot do this.
    >
    >
     
    Tron2003, Jul 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. Marko

    Jesse Guest

    Reinstall os without reformating if you can't get the same hw specs.

    Jesse
    Manila, Phils.

    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > know how to deal with this problem.
    >
    > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    >
    > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > unlikely to get the answer).
    >
    > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > assume that you cannot do this.
    >
    >



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date: 7/18/2003
     
    Jesse, Jul 23, 2003
    #3
  4. Marko

    licknlabia Guest

    How does windows know to install ACPI enabled HAL upon installation?
    Why can't you switch between a standard HAL and an ACPI enabled HAL?
    How do you know which HAL is installed by windows? List the steps to get
    there....
    Do you have to reinstall windows if you want to change the HAL type or can
    you change the HAL type without doing anything else?

    You should be able to answer these simple questions... so are you a *hack* ?

    I'm not as nice, I won't post the answers. muahahahahahahaha

    - peace.

    p.s

    reinstall windows over the top otherwise known as an in-place upgrade, hw
    gets reenumerated


    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    know how to deal with this problem.

    If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    just surprises me that very few seem to know how.

    Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    unlikely to get the answer).

    How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    assume that you cannot do this.
     
    licknlabia, Jul 23, 2003
    #4
  5. Well I would do the same as Jesse.
    Reinstall OS without formatiing the HD, and hit F5 during installation to
    install the new HAL

    Best Regards

    Jesper


    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > know how to deal with this problem.
    >
    > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    >
    > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > unlikely to get the answer).
    >
    > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > assume that you cannot do this.
    >
    >
     
    Jesper Pedersen, Jul 23, 2003
    #5
  6. "Tron2003" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Homo!!


    I'm sorry, but Homogenized Milk is the incorrect answer.

    Thank you for playing, though.

    Don Pardo, what parting gifts to we have for Mr. Tron2003?


    --
    Fris "A paper MCSE certificate!" bee® MCNGP #13

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
     
    =?Windows-1252?Q?Frisbee=AE_MCNGP?=, Jul 23, 2003
    #6
  7. Marko

    Consultant Guest

    you could also install it as a second copy (dual boot) to a different folder
    c:\winntnew or whatever which you can boot to the new install then get at
    the data

    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > know how to deal with this problem.
    >
    > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    >
    > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > unlikely to get the answer).
    >
    > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > assume that you cannot do this.
    >
    >
     
    Consultant, Jul 23, 2003
    #7
  8. Marko

    Gary - US Guest

    Sorry puffer. Homo = Tron2003 is not the correct answer.

    --

    Semper Fi & God Bless America,

    Gary-US MCNGP #20 & retired Jarhead

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
    ** Kindly Do The Needful **

    "Tron2003" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Homo!!
    >
    >
    > "Marko" <> wrote in message
    > news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > > know how to deal with this problem.
    > >
    > > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    > >
    > > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > > unlikely to get the answer).
    > >
    > > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > > assume that you cannot do this.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Gary - US, Jul 23, 2003
    #8
  9. Marko

    licknlabia Guest

    yes, that does occur, however, not all of the time.

    "William" <> wrote in message
    news:036a01c35151$b5085990$...
    I don't know about the rest of you, but I've taken a
    perfectly good hard drive with Windows 2000 Pro from one
    computer to another with completely different hardware and
    it boots just fine (and finds the new hardware)....no BSOD
    for me.

    William

    >-----Original Message-----
    >In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    >how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    >guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    >technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    >know how to deal with this problem.
    >
    >If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    >here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who

    works
    >with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    >just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    >
    >Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    >where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    >destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    >needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    >get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    >I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    >need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    >unlikely to get the answer).
    >
    >How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    >lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    >hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    >assume that you cannot do this.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    licknlabia, Jul 23, 2003
    #9
  10. Marko

    Gary - US Guest

    Yes. I did that a couple weeks ago without a hitch. I prefer not to but it
    worked fine.

    --

    Semper Fi & God Bless America,

    Gary-US MCNGP #20 & retired Jarhead

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
    ** Kindly Do The Needful **

    "William" <> wrote in message
    news:036a01c35151$b5085990$...
    > I don't know about the rest of you, but I've taken a
    > perfectly good hard drive with Windows 2000 Pro from one
    > computer to another with completely different hardware and
    > it boots just fine (and finds the new hardware)....no BSOD
    > for me.
    >
    > William
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > >how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > >guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > >technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > >know how to deal with this problem.
    > >
    > >If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > >here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who

    > works
    > >with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > >just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    > >
    > >Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > >where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > >destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > >needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > >get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > >I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > >need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > >unlikely to get the answer).
    > >
    > >How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > >lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > >hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > >assume that you cannot do this.
    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
     
    Gary - US, Jul 23, 2003
    #10
  11. Marko

    licknlabia Guest

    I don't disagree.

    "Gary - US" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    It occurs most of the time.

    --

    Semper Fi & God Bless America,

    Gary-US MCNGP #20 & retired Jarhead

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
    ** Kindly Do The Needful **

    "licknlabia" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > yes, that does occur, however, not all of the time.
    >
    > "William" <> wrote in message
    > news:036a01c35151$b5085990$...
    > I don't know about the rest of you, but I've taken a
    > perfectly good hard drive with Windows 2000 Pro from one
    > computer to another with completely different hardware and
    > it boots just fine (and finds the new hardware)....no BSOD
    > for me.
    >
    > William
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > >how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > >guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > >technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > >know how to deal with this problem.
    > >
    > >If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > >here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who

    > works
    > >with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > >just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    > >
    > >Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > >where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > >destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > >needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > >get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > >I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > >need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > >unlikely to get the answer).
    > >
    > >How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > >lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > >hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > >assume that you cannot do this.
    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >

    >
    >
     
    licknlabia, Jul 23, 2003
    #11
  12. Marko

    Jesse Guest

    ok thanks. i have to try that on my lab.

    Jesse
    Manila, Phils.

    "jon" <> wrote in message
    news:03b401c35154$84aa6c90$...
    > just repair the install, works every time
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >Reinstall os without reformating if you can't get the

    > same hw specs.
    > >
    > >Jesse
    > >Manila, Phils.
    > >
    > >"Marko" <> wrote in message
    > >news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > >> In the last month, I have had to explain to three

    > *hacks*
    > >> how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > >> guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > >> technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > >> know how to deal with this problem.
    > >>
    > >> If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > >> here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who

    > works
    > >> with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > >> just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    > >>
    > >> Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > >> where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > >> destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard

    > disk
    > >> needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > >> get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > >> I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If

    > you
    > >> need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > >> unlikely to get the answer).
    > >>
    > >> How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine

    > and
    > >> lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > >> hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > >> assume that you cannot do this.
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >---
    > >Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > >Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > >Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date:

    > 7/18/2003
    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date: 7/18/2003
     
    Jesse, Jul 24, 2003
    #12
  13. Marko

    Gary - US Guest

    The PI!! WOOOOOOOO HOOOOOOOOO!!

    --
    Semper Fi & God Bless America,

    Gary-US MCNGP #20

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help

    "Kindly do the needful"

    "Jesse" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ok thanks. i have to try that on my lab.
    >
    > Jesse
    > Manila, Phils.
    >
    > "jon" <> wrote in message
    > news:03b401c35154$84aa6c90$...
    > > just repair the install, works every time
    > > >-----Original Message-----
    > > >Reinstall os without reformating if you can't get the

    > > same hw specs.
    > > >
    > > >Jesse
    > > >Manila, Phils.
    > > >
    > > >"Marko" <> wrote in message
    > > >news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > > >> In the last month, I have had to explain to three

    > > *hacks*
    > > >> how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > > >> guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > > >> technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > > >> know how to deal with this problem.
    > > >>
    > > >> If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > > >> here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who

    > > works
    > > >> with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > > >> just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    > > >>
    > > >> Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > > >> where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > > >> destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard

    > > disk
    > > >> needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > > >> get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > > >> I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If

    > > you
    > > >> need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > > >> unlikely to get the answer).
    > > >>
    > > >> How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine

    > > and
    > > >> lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > > >> hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > > >> assume that you cannot do this.
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >---
    > > >Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > > >Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > > >Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date:

    > > 7/18/2003
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >.
    > > >

    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date: 7/18/2003
    >
    >
     
    Gary - US, Jul 24, 2003
    #13
  14. Marko

    Marko Guest

    And the correct answer is....

    It was said fairly early in the piece: Boot from a setup
    disk and go through the motions of running an
    installation. After accepting the agreement during text
    mode setup, you will be told that there was a windows
    installation found and you get to upgrade (which can be a
    downgrade sometimes, but it still works), continue with a
    fresh installation or quit. Key point is that this occurs
    AFTER you would have already had another screen that was
    asking similar questions (in addition to repair option),
    except it would not have advised that there was another
    installation found. You choose to run setup at this time.

    Windows setup will re enumerate all your new hardware and
    install all the correct drivers. It is during discussions
    with the Hardware Abstraction Layer that you get the BSOD
    and windows stops loading.

    Sorry: Being paid by the hour and taking longer to do a
    job (add time for data recovery and additional software
    loading to running Windows setup) is not the correct
    answer. I challenge you to go to the person paying to
    have the job done and tell them you have two options and
    you intend to take the most expensive one that will likely
    yield the poorer overall result. That there is a chance
    you won't be able to recover all the customers data and
    application settings because you choose not to take the
    easier route. Consider the extra work if this is a single
    server for a network domain when all youhave to do is run
    the setup as described, run service pack and hotfixes and
    re install Internet Explorer (since the setup version is
    older).

    XP version of this is a little trickier in that you will
    not be able to legitimately use the old XP activation
    key. Anyhow: you need a new OEM copy of the OS to be
    purchased with the new hardware you are buying, right?

    You will need to run Adobe Reader, Winzip, office product,
    etc. at least once before using since it is just like
    running Sysprep; all the other applications will need
    their license agreements accepted again.


    Thanks for playing.
     
    Marko, Jul 24, 2003
    #14
  15. Marko

    Frank Guest

    Morning,

    1. Check the BIOS to make sure the drive is set for it.
    2. This sounds like a video card problem, and should boot into safe mode to
    see if this resolves the problem.
    3. Do a repair install. after which it fines all the needed hardware.

    Frank


    "Consultant" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > you could also install it as a second copy (dual boot) to a different

    folder
    > c:\winntnew or whatever which you can boot to the new install then get at
    > the data
    >
    > "Marko" <> wrote in message
    > news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > > know how to deal with this problem.
    > >
    > > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    > >
    > > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > > unlikely to get the answer).
    > >
    > > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > > assume that you cannot do this.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Frank, Jul 24, 2003
    #15
  16. Marko

    Consultant Guest

    who mentioned ripping off a customer?


    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:0adf01c351bc$5c192880$...
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >Morning,
    > >
    > >1. Check the BIOS to make sure the drive is set for it.
    > >2. This sounds like a video card problem, and should boot

    > into safe mode to
    > >see if this resolves the problem.
    > >3. Do a repair install. after which it fines all the

    > needed hardware.
    > >
    > >Frank
    > >

    >
    > Hello Frank.
    >
    > 1. Yes.
    > 2. No. It is a problem that occurs when the installation
    > cannot talk to the installed hardware. ie the mainboard
    > has changed so the chipset is different, for one.
    > 3. Repair install. No such thing. If you mean repair the
    > install, the repair option does not work in this case to
    > get the drive to work again with the new hardware. Try it.
    >
    >
    > The point of this challenge was to show how a common
    > problem encounted by anyone working on systems for a
    > reasonable length of time could be tackled in so many
    > different ways when only one answer is a good one time
    > wise and has maximum benefits for the customer in keeping
    > costs down and basically restoring the data set back to
    > the point of failure.
    >
    > Anyone who thinks ripping off the client by charging for
    > hours of work that can be easily avoided and telling the
    > client that "The best solution here is to start with a
    > fresh installation and then we'll try and restore the data
    > as best as we can but you'd better be prepared for some
    > data loss" - You need to revisit Ethics 101.
    >
    > The best solution is sometimes a simple one and doesn't
    > have to be complex and costly.
    >
    >
     
    Consultant, Jul 24, 2003
    #16
  17. Marko

    Guest Guest

    Are you really that dense???

    >-----Original Message-----
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>Morning,
    >>
    >>1. Check the BIOS to make sure the drive is set for it.
    >>2. This sounds like a video card problem, and should

    boot
    >into safe mode to
    >>see if this resolves the problem.
    >>3. Do a repair install. after which it fines all the

    >needed hardware.
    >>
    >>Frank
    >>

    >
    >Hello Frank.
    >
    >1. Yes.
    >2. No. It is a problem that occurs when the installation
    >cannot talk to the installed hardware. ie the mainboard
    >has changed so the chipset is different, for one.
    >3. Repair install. No such thing. If you mean repair

    the
    >install, the repair option does not work in this case to
    >get the drive to work again with the new hardware. Try

    it.
    >
    >
    >The point of this challenge was to show how a common
    >problem encounted by anyone working on systems for a
    >reasonable length of time could be tackled in so many
    >different ways when only one answer is a good one time
    >wise and has maximum benefits for the customer in keeping
    >costs down and basically restoring the data set back to
    >the point of failure.
    >
    >Anyone who thinks ripping off the client by charging for
    >hours of work that can be easily avoided and telling the
    >client that "The best solution here is to start with a
    >fresh installation and then we'll try and restore the

    data
    >as best as we can but you'd better be prepared for some
    >data loss" - You need to revisit Ethics 101.
    >
    >The best solution is sometimes a simple one and doesn't
    >have to be complex and costly.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Guest, Jul 24, 2003
    #17
  18. Marko

    Gary - US Guest

    Re: And the correct answer is....

    Bye

    --

    Semper Fi & God Bless America,

    Gary-US MCNGP #20 & retired Jarhead

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
    ** Kindly Do The Needful **

    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:091401c351a1$770756a0$...
    > It was said fairly early in the piece: Boot from a setup
    > disk and go through the motions of running an
    > installation. After accepting the agreement during text
    > mode setup, you will be told that there was a windows
    > installation found and you get to upgrade (which can be a
    > downgrade sometimes, but it still works), continue with a
    > fresh installation or quit. Key point is that this occurs
    > AFTER you would have already had another screen that was
    > asking similar questions (in addition to repair option),
    > except it would not have advised that there was another
    > installation found. You choose to run setup at this time.
    >
    > Windows setup will re enumerate all your new hardware and
    > install all the correct drivers. It is during discussions
    > with the Hardware Abstraction Layer that you get the BSOD
    > and windows stops loading.
    >
    > Sorry: Being paid by the hour and taking longer to do a
    > job (add time for data recovery and additional software
    > loading to running Windows setup) is not the correct
    > answer. I challenge you to go to the person paying to
    > have the job done and tell them you have two options and
    > you intend to take the most expensive one that will likely
    > yield the poorer overall result. That there is a chance
    > you won't be able to recover all the customers data and
    > application settings because you choose not to take the
    > easier route. Consider the extra work if this is a single
    > server for a network domain when all youhave to do is run
    > the setup as described, run service pack and hotfixes and
    > re install Internet Explorer (since the setup version is
    > older).
    >
    > XP version of this is a little trickier in that you will
    > not be able to legitimately use the old XP activation
    > key. Anyhow: you need a new OEM copy of the OS to be
    > purchased with the new hardware you are buying, right?
    >
    > You will need to run Adobe Reader, Winzip, office product,
    > etc. at least once before using since it is just like
    > running Sysprep; all the other applications will need
    > their license agreements accepted again.
    >
    >
    > Thanks for playing.
    >
    >
     
    Gary - US, Jul 24, 2003
    #18
  19. Marko

    Cheeseburger Guest

    We are all basking in your superior radiance!

    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > know how to deal with this problem.
    >
    > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    >
    > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > unlikely to get the answer).
    >
    > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > assume that you cannot do this.
    >
    >
     
    Cheeseburger, Jul 25, 2003
    #19
  20. First I would try to boot from W2K or W2K3 CD or boot disks and see if a
    "repair" could possibbly trick the OS into letting you update the new HAL
    driver.

    Otherwise, just reinstall the OS in the same folder as before and the DATA
    should be in same location (as long as not in a Windows OS folder. Or
    upgrade OS.

    "Cheeseburger" <name@company> wrote in message
    news:uI%...
    > We are all basking in your superior radiance!
    >
    > "Marko" <> wrote in message
    > news:061f01c350cb$7e7e85b0$...
    > > In the last month, I have had to explain to three *hacks*
    > > how to get past what I think is a simple problem. These
    > > guys are either self confessed computer experts, shop
    > > technicians or gurus in their own minds, but they don't
    > > know how to deal with this problem.
    > >
    > > If you think you know, post an outline of the solution
    > > here, otherwise I will in a few days. Everybody who works
    > > with computers daily needs to know how to do this and it
    > > just surprises me that very few seem to know how.
    > >
    > > Problem: You have a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 computer
    > > where the hard disk is perfect but the mainboard is
    > > destroyed or there is some other reason why the hard disk
    > > needs to go to a new machine. When you turn it on, you
    > > get a BSOD advising you to contact the hardware vendor.
    > > I'll give you a clue: The HAL has changed. (Note: If you
    > > need to ask or look up what HAL is then you are highly
    > > unlikely to get the answer).
    > >
    > > How do you make the harddisk boot in this new machine and
    > > lose NO DATA? The solution is not to replicate the old
    > > hardware. Yes, that nearly always works, but you are to
    > > assume that you cannot do this.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Diana K Brown, Jul 29, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

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