Security Questions

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Jase, Jan 20, 2004.

  1. Jase

    Jase Guest

    - Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of the
    concept of ubiquitous computing?

    - Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in the
    context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that user?

    TIA.
    Jase, Jan 20, 2004
    #1
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  2. In article <bujmaf$icbqg$-berlin.de>,
    says...
    > - Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of the
    > concept of ubiquitous computing?
    >


    To me, the above is a no-brainer. If more and more security exploits are
    present and used, causing instability in the current computer use model,
    folks will hesitate to allow computers further and further into their
    lives, hesitate to rely more and more on computers for everyday
    activities.

    > - Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in the
    > context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that user?
    >


    The power switch(es) and/or unplugging from the net.




    --
    Colonel Flagg
    http://www.internetwarzone.org/

    Privacy at a click:
    http://www.cotse.net

    Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."

    "...I see stupid people."
    Colonel Flagg, Jan 20, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jase

    Alan P Guest

    Sounds like a homework question :)

    "Jase" <> wrote in message
    news:bujmaf$icbqg$-berlin.de...
    > - Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of the
    > concept of ubiquitous computing?
    >
    > - Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in the
    > context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that user?
    >
    > TIA.
    >
    >
    Alan P, Jan 20, 2004
    #3
  4. Jase

    Jim Watt Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 16:51:04 -0000, "Jase" <> wrote:

    >- Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of the
    >concept of ubiquitous computing?


    They do not.

    >- Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in the
    >context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that user?


    The Police.


    --
    Jim Watt http://www.gibnet.com
    Jim Watt, Jan 20, 2004
    #4
  5. Jase

    BigWallop Guest

    "Jase" <> wrote in message
    news:bujmaf$icbqg$-berlin.de...
    > - Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of the
    > concept of ubiquitous computing?
    >
    > - Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in the
    > context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that user?
    >
    > TIA.
    >
    >


    You watch to much Sci-Fi. Both your questions are a non-entity for normal
    computer users. Now go away silly boy and read more comic books.
    BigWallop, Jan 21, 2004
    #5
  6. In article <buju1c$bmc$>, "Alan P" <alan@
    (nojunkplease)alancode.net> says...
    > Sounds like a homework question :)
    >
    > "Jase" <> wrote in message
    > news:bujmaf$icbqg$-berlin.de...
    > > - Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of the
    > > concept of ubiquitous computing?
    > >
    > > - Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in the
    > > context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that user?
    > >
    > > TIA.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >



    exactly what I was thinking.



    --
    Colonel Flagg
    http://www.internetwarzone.org/

    Privacy at a click:
    http://www.cotse.net

    Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."

    "...I see stupid people."
    Colonel Flagg, Jan 21, 2004
    #6
  7. The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll see
    biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a resource,
    etc.

    There's probably either a good SF plot device or a thesis in that if these
    were homework questions. :)
    --
    Drew Cooper [MSFT]
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.


    "Colonel Flagg" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > In article <buju1c$bmc$>, "Alan P" <alan@
    > (nojunkplease)alancode.net> says...
    > > Sounds like a homework question :)
    > >
    > > "Jase" <> wrote in message
    > > news:bujmaf$icbqg$-berlin.de...
    > > > - Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of

    the
    > > > concept of ubiquitous computing?
    > > >
    > > > - Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in

    the
    > > > context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that

    user?
    > > >
    > > > TIA.
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > exactly what I was thinking.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Colonel Flagg
    > http://www.internetwarzone.org/
    >
    > Privacy at a click:
    > http://www.cotse.net
    >
    > Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    > A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."
    >
    > "...I see stupid people."
    Drew Cooper [MSFT], Jan 21, 2004
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    says...
    > The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll see
    > biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a resource,
    > etc.



    i've always thought that someone should pass a test before they're
    allowed to own and/or operate a computer.... a level of competency
    should be displayed before you let someone loose on the Internet
    especially. it should be mandatory that parents monitor children <16
    years old.

    yea, I know it's unenforceable. but we all have dreams.


    --
    Colonel Flagg
    http://www.internetwarzone.org/

    Privacy at a click:
    http://www.cotse.net

    Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."

    "...I see stupid people."
    Colonel Flagg, Jan 21, 2004
    #8
  9. Jase

    Ford Prefect Guest

    Drew Cooper [MSFT] wrote:
    > The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll see
    > biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a resource,
    > etc.
    >
    > There's probably either a good SF plot device or a thesis in that if these
    > were homework questions. :)


    "Duress" passwrods already do just that and are in use in some
    interesting places. Principal is that user has a special password that
    is only entered under "duress" conditions - security system then alerts
    appropriate personnel for action.
    Ford Prefect, Jan 21, 2004
    #9
  10. Jase

    BigWallop Guest

    "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > Drew Cooper [MSFT] wrote:
    > > The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll

    see
    > > biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a

    resource,
    > > etc.
    > >
    > > There's probably either a good SF plot device or a thesis in that if

    these
    > > were homework questions. :)

    >
    > "Duress" passwrods already do just that and are in use in some
    > interesting places. Principal is that user has a special password that
    > is only entered under "duress" conditions - security system then alerts
    > appropriate personnel for action.
    >


    An example of this please.


    ---
    http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.563 / Virus Database: 355 - Release Date: 17/01/04
    BigWallop, Jan 21, 2004
    #10
  11. Jase

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    Rowdy Yates, Jan 21, 2004
    #11
  12. Jase

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    Colonel Flagg <> wrote in
    news::

    > In article <>,
    > says...
    >> The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll
    >> see biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access
    >> a resource, etc.

    >
    >
    > i've always thought that someone should pass a test before they're
    > allowed to own and/or operate a computer.... a level of competency
    > should be displayed before you let someone loose on the Internet
    > especially. it should be mandatory that parents monitor children <16
    > years old.
    >
    > yea, I know it's unenforceable. but we all have dreams.
    >
    >


    i think more rigorus testing & screening of automobile drivers on the road
    is of much more importance in society.

    a stupid person in a car can kill you and your entire family in a split
    second on the highway.*

    a stupid computer user can be ignored.

    *sorry, i am just getting real pissed off at people on the cell phone and
    women putting on makeup while they are driving 120 on the highway.

    --
    Rowdy Yates
    I am Against-TCPA
    http://www.againsttcpa.com
    Rowdy Yates, Jan 21, 2004
    #12
  13. Jase

    Ford Prefect Guest

    BigWallop wrote:
    > "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>
    >>Drew Cooper [MSFT] wrote:
    >>
    >>>The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll

    >>

    > see
    >
    >>>biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a

    >>

    > resource,
    >
    >>>etc.
    >>>
    >>>There's probably either a good SF plot device or a thesis in that if

    >>

    > these
    >
    >>>were homework questions. :)

    >>
    >>"Duress" passwrods already do just that and are in use in some
    >>interesting places. Principal is that user has a special password that
    >>is only entered under "duress" conditions - security system then alerts
    >>appropriate personnel for action.
    >>

    >
    >
    > An example of this please.


    Example of what? How it works? That's self-explanatory.

    >
    >
    > ---
    > http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
    >
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.563 / Virus Database: 355 - Release Date: 17/01/04
    >
    >
    Ford Prefect, Jan 21, 2004
    #13
  14. Jase

    BigWallop Guest

    "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > BigWallop wrote:
    > > "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >
    > >>
    > >>Drew Cooper [MSFT] wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll
    > >>

    > > see
    > >
    > >>>biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a
    > >>

    > > resource,
    > >
    > >>>etc.
    > >>>
    > >>>There's probably either a good SF plot device or a thesis in that if
    > >>

    > > these
    > >
    > >>>were homework questions. :)
    > >>
    > >>"Duress" passwrods already do just that and are in use in some
    > >>interesting places. Principal is that user has a special password that
    > >>is only entered under "duress" conditions - security system then alerts
    > >>appropriate personnel for action.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > An example of this please.

    >
    > Example of what? How it works? That's self-explanatory.
    >
    >


    Of how it would work please.


    ---
    http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.563 / Virus Database: 355 - Release Date: 17/01/04
    BigWallop, Jan 21, 2004
    #14
  15. In article <OaoPb.5464$>,
    spamguard@_spam_guard.com says...
    >
    > "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > >
    > > BigWallop wrote:
    > > > "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > >
    > > >>
    > > >>Drew Cooper [MSFT] wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>>The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll
    > > >>
    > > > see
    > > >
    > > >>>biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a
    > > >>
    > > > resource,
    > > >
    > > >>>etc.
    > > >>>
    > > >>>There's probably either a good SF plot device or a thesis in that if
    > > >>
    > > > these
    > > >
    > > >>>were homework questions. :)
    > > >>
    > > >>"Duress" passwrods already do just that and are in use in some
    > > >>interesting places. Principal is that user has a special password that
    > > >>is only entered under "duress" conditions - security system then alerts
    > > >>appropriate personnel for action.
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > An example of this please.

    > >
    > > Example of what? How it works? That's self-explanatory.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Of how it would work please.
    >
    >



    he already did. it's rather simple really and it's been around for a
    long time.... not necessarily an electronically entered password, but
    duress signals of some sort.. the most basic example is a bank. if the
    banker doesn't open a set of window blinds before opening of the
    morning... the signal is read by local law enforcement and indicates a
    possible bank robber.... the practice can be done anywhere, anytime. a
    keyword spoken, a password (or an alternate "duress" password, which
    gives access to certain areas and also notifies authorities of a
    compromise). use your imagination.




    --
    Colonel Flagg
    http://www.internetwarzone.org/

    Privacy at a click:
    http://www.cotse.net

    Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."

    "...I see stupid people."
    Colonel Flagg, Jan 21, 2004
    #15
  16. In article <Xns9476EAD45D187rowdyyatesnospamlyco@66.185.95.104>,
    says...

    > > i've always thought that someone should pass a test before they're
    > > allowed to own and/or operate a computer.... a level of competency
    > > should be displayed before you let someone loose on the Internet
    > > especially. it should be mandatory that parents monitor children <16
    > > years old.
    > >
    > > yea, I know it's unenforceable. but we all have dreams.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > i think more rigorus testing & screening of automobile drivers on the road
    > is of much more importance in society.
    >
    > a stupid person in a car can kill you and your entire family in a split
    > second on the highway.*


    agreed.


    >
    > a stupid computer user can be ignored.
    >



    nope. not if you make your money supporting small businesses that hire
    folks for their "historically" correct skill-sets, not realizing the
    computer-age is here and they MUST be computer savvy.



    > *sorry, i am just getting real pissed off at people on the cell phone and
    > women putting on makeup while they are driving 120 on the highway.
    >
    >


    or reading the morning paper, a novel, leaving children unrestrained,
    driving wild... you should see some of the accidents i've worked
    (volunteer fire fighter for 18 years).



    --
    Colonel Flagg
    http://www.internetwarzone.org/

    Privacy at a click:
    http://www.cotse.net

    Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."

    "...I see stupid people."
    Colonel Flagg, Jan 21, 2004
    #16
  17. Jase

    Guardenman Guest

    Jase wrote:
    >
    > - Why do security breaches in computing threaten the development of the
    > concept of ubiquitous computing?

    I don't have a good answer fo rthis one.


    >
    > - Can anyone suggest a security mechanism which would be effective in the
    > context of an intruder who holds a user hostage and threatens that user?


    A second pass code that would allow the user to log on and gain access,
    but would also notify security that there is a problem. This of coarse
    has to be backed up by well trained armed security guards.



    >
    > TIA.


    --

    Quote of the month

    .. When trouble arises and things look bad, there is
    always one individual who perceives a solution and is
    willing to take command. Very often, that individual is
    crazy.


    Ok two quotes:

    "The SAT losing the analogy section is like Christmas
    losing fruitcake — it may have been “tried and true, but nobody really
    ever liked it that much.”
    Jon Zeitlin, director of Kaplan’s New SAT test-prep program,.
    Guardenman, Jan 21, 2004
    #17
  18. Jase

    Guardenman Guest

    How it would work depends on the system and what it is used for.

    BigWallop wrote:
    >
    > "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > >
    > > BigWallop wrote:
    > > > "Ford Prefect" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > >
    > > >>
    > > >>Drew Cooper [MSFT] wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>>The second question seems interesting to me. Made me wonder if we'll
    > > >>
    > > > see
    > > >
    > > >>>biometric devices that only allow "calm" users to log on, access a
    > > >>
    > > > resource,
    > > >
    > > >>>etc.
    > > >>>
    > > >>>There's probably either a good SF plot device or a thesis in that if
    > > >>
    > > > these
    > > >
    > > >>>were homework questions. :)
    > > >>
    > > >>"Duress" passwrods already do just that and are in use in some
    > > >>interesting places. Principal is that user has a special password that
    > > >>is only entered under "duress" conditions - security system then alerts
    > > >>appropriate personnel for action.
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > An example of this please.

    > >
    > > Example of what? How it works? That's self-explanatory.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Of how it would work please.
    >
    > ---
    > http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
    >
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.563 / Virus Database: 355 - Release Date: 17/01/04


    --

    Quote of the month

    .. When trouble arises and things look bad, there is
    always one individual who perceives a solution and is
    willing to take command. Very often, that individual is
    crazy.


    Ok two quotes:

    "The SAT losing the analogy section is like Christmas
    losing fruitcake — it may have been “tried and true, but nobody really
    ever liked it that much.”
    Jon Zeitlin, director of Kaplan’s New SAT test-prep program,.
    Guardenman, Jan 21, 2004
    #18
  19. Jase

    Jase Guest

    "BigWallop" <spamguard@_spam_guard.com> wrote in message
    news:OaoPb.5464$...
    <snip!>
    >
    > Of how it would work please.


    It's hardly a difficult concept.
    Jase, Jan 21, 2004
    #19
  20. Jase

    Jase Guest

    "Alan P" <alan@(nojunkplease)alancode.net> wrote in message
    news:buju1c$bmc$...
    > Sounds like a homework question :)


    You're warm...
    Jase, Jan 21, 2004
    #20
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