Security overkill?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Louise, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. Louise

    Louise Guest

    Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    email/pim.

    I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.

    I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    the shields active.

    I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    every week or so.

    I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and I'm
    once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on guard" all
    the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.

    Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?

    TIA

    Louise
    Louise, Jul 13, 2005
    #1
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  2. Louise

    KH Guest

    Well, it really depends. On one hand you have the phrase "better safe than
    sorry" which is applicable in this situation. But it also depends on how
    much you use the internet and what kinds of websites you visit.

    In my opinion, a good security set up for a computer on a router (and I
    assume broadband) should consist of A browser that doesn't use activeX
    (Firefox or Netscape), a AntiVirus, a Firewall (Software, on the computer in
    addition to the one on the router because the router does not filter
    outbound connections), 2-3 AntiSpyware (1 paid and 2 Free I recommend
    Ad-Aware and Microsoft AntiSpyware for the free. McAfee, Webroot Spy
    Sweeper or Spyware Doctor for the Paid. Using only one of the paid will
    work.) Yes Spyware Doctor will work and it will not take up any more space
    than any other AntiSpyware. No AntiSpyware is a Magic Bullet so it is
    important to use the combo I listed above or something like it. Personally
    I use McAfee Internet Security suite and McAfee AntiSpyware along with
    AdAware and Microsoft Antispyware and I use Netscape for my browser.

    But again, it all depends on your needs. I need the internet for my job and
    I can't afford any down time and I have to go on a number of sites where the
    security of the site is not clear

    Also, if you are have problems with SPAM run a spam filter. SpamKiller by
    McAfee works well.
    KH, Jul 13, 2005
    #2
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  3. From: "Louise" <>

    | Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    | with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    | email/pim.
    |
    | I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    | software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    |
    | I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    | the shields active.
    |
    | I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    | every week or so.
    |
    | I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and I'm
    | once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on guard" all
    | the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.
    |
    | Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    | inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?
    |
    | TIA
    |
    | Louise

    The software sounds fine.

    However, I do suggest the you block both TCP and UDP ports 135 ~ 139 and 445 on the Router.

    Depending on the model and version, the settings are at the following URL...
    http://192.168.1.1/Filters.htm

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    David H. Lipman, Jul 13, 2005
    #3
  4. Louise

    Imhotep Guest

    Louise wrote:

    > Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    > with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    > email/pim.
    >
    > I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    > software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    >
    > I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    > the shields active.
    >
    > I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    > every week or so.
    >
    > I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and I'm
    > once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on guard" all
    > the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.
    >
    > Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    > inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Louise


    ....on windows you can never run too much security software...
    Imhotep, Jul 13, 2005
    #4
  5. On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 10:04:36 -0400, Louise <> wrote:

    >Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    >with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    >email/pim.
    >
    >I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    >software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    >
    >I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    >the shields active.
    >
    >I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    >every week or so.
    >
    >I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and I'm
    >once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on guard" all
    >the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.
    >
    >Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    >inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >Louise



    I think that you are doing fine,... agree that Spyware Doctor does not
    need to run on guard,... free copy is ok. The only thing I mess in
    your list is a regular clean-up of temporary & other non functional
    bits & pieces. (Be Clean or Crap Cleaner). And a disk cleaning from
    time to time,... defrag,... and an additional (other) spyware cleaner
    (Ad Aware, Spybot)
    not at all overkill imho



    --
    www.nondisputandum.com - soft reviews:
    freeware to Protect & Clean your PC
    freeware Office tools & Webbuilding aid
    + the Internet Addiction Test ;-)
    nondisputandum, Jul 13, 2005
    #5
  6. Louise

    speeder Guest

    On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 10:04:36 -0400, Louise <> wrote:

    >Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    >with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    >email/pim.
    >
    >I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    >software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    >
    >I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    >the shields active.
    >
    >I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    >every week or so.


    It all depends on what sort of internet lifestyle you have.

    You say you are a heavy office user, what does that mean? Do you run
    web/mail/proxy/mySQL servers for example? Vulnerabilities in server
    software could allow an intruder to completely own your box despite
    the things you have right now. For this kind of situation you want to
    look into things such as hardening your server/OS and using security
    apps that monitor processes and prevent hijacking (ProcessGuard is
    absolutely the best).

    As a heavy home user do you install and experiment with a lot of stuff
    from non mainstream sources? If you're not installing stuff regularly,
    it tends to go the overkill side.

    I would ditch Outlook, but that's more of a precaution than a
    necessity. You should be alright but you never know where the next
    security flaw is going to be. And be certain there will be.

    Rootkit technology is only in its infancy so be on the lookout for new
    preventive measures as this evolves. Right now, I think only
    ProcessGuard type apps would be effective against it.
    speeder, Jul 13, 2005
    #6
  7. Louise

    Louise Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 10:04:36 -0400, Louise <> wrote:
    >
    > >Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    > >with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    > >email/pim.
    > >
    > >I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    > >software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    > >
    > >I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    > >the shields active.
    > >
    > >I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    > >every week or so.

    >
    > It all depends on what sort of internet lifestyle you have.
    >
    > You say you are a heavy office user, what does that mean? Do you run
    > web/mail/proxy/mySQL servers for example? Vulnerabilities in server
    > software could allow an intruder to completely own your box despite
    > the things you have right now. For this kind of situation you want to
    > look into things such as hardening your server/OS and using security
    > apps that monitor processes and prevent hijacking (ProcessGuard is
    > absolutely the best).


    I don't run a server. I do access webmail on one host server that gets
    approximately 100 pieces of spam/day. I also run GoToMyPC and access my
    machine from outisde on a somewhat regular basis.
    >
    > As a heavy home user do you install and experiment with a lot of stuff
    > from non mainstream sources? If you're not installing stuff regularly,
    > it tends to go the overkill side.


    I don't install a lot of non-mainstream stuff as I always try to be
    careful. I run Firefox, Trillium, and several small utilities such as a
    batch file creator, but nothing really "experimental".

    >
    > I would ditch Outlook, but that's more of a precaution than a
    > necessity. You should be alright but you never know where the next
    > security flaw is going to be. And be certain there will be.


    I love Outlook and have used it happily for many years. It syncs with
    my Palm Pilot and although I know it's "risky", I don't want to part
    with it. I'm running Avast on the high setting for Outlook and I use
    SpamBayes. Beyond that, I never open attachments without scanning them
    and I hope I stay safe. I do keep a few Ghost image backups about 3
    weeks apart from one another.
    >
    > Rootkit technology is only in its infancy so be on the lookout for new
    > preventive measures as this evolves. Right now, I think only
    > ProcessGuard type apps would be effective against it.
    >

    So, with the above clarifications. You suggested I might be on the
    "overkill side", and that is my suspicion as well. What would you not
    run, or not leave running, to reduce the "overkill"?

    TIA

    Louise
    Louise, Jul 13, 2005
    #7
  8. Louise

    Louise Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 10:04:36 -0400, Louise <> wrote:
    >
    > >Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    > >with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    > >email/pim.
    > >
    > >I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    > >software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    > >
    > >I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    > >the shields active.
    > >
    > >I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    > >every week or so.
    > >
    > >I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and I'm
    > >once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on guard" all
    > >the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.
    > >
    > >Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    > >inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?
    > >
    > >TIA
    > >
    > >Louise

    >
    >
    > I think that you are doing fine,... agree that Spyware Doctor does not
    > need to run on guard,... free copy is ok. The only thing I mess in
    > your list is a regular clean-up of temporary & other non functional
    > bits & pieces. (Be Clean or Crap Cleaner). And a disk cleaning from
    > time to time,... defrag,... and an additional (other) spyware cleaner
    > (Ad Aware, Spybot)
    > not at all overkill imho
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    You have a point about cleanup. Here's what I do now:

    I run AdAware once in a while in addition to Spy Doctor.

    I run a different anti virus program online (free), once in a while.

    I defrag on an average of once a week with Diskeeper.

    I generally use Firfox and have the preferences set so as to keep
    history for only a few days etc. I actually want this history.

    Whenever I uninstall a program, I run JV16 to clean the registry. And,
    about every month, completely haphazardly, I run JV16 and clean out
    whatever has accumulated.

    I use Executive Software Undelete. Therefore, I wouldn't want the
    recycle bin cleaned completely.

    So, a lot of my programs control the data build up, but not all of it.

    I looked a Crap Clean and Be Clean and they both looked like they did a
    lot of the things I'm already doing one way or the other.

    Is there something I could do to just clean out temp files and other
    odds and ends that wouldn't want to do more than I need or want?

    Louise
    Louise, Jul 13, 2005
    #8
  9. Louise

    speeder Guest

    On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 17:11:31 -0400, Louise <> wrote:

    >> You say you are a heavy office user, what does that mean? Do you run
    >> web/mail/proxy/mySQL servers for example? Vulnerabilities in server
    >> software could allow an intruder to completely own your box despite
    >> the things you have right now. For this kind of situation you want to
    >> look into things such as hardening your server/OS and using security
    >> apps that monitor processes and prevent hijacking (ProcessGuard is
    >> absolutely the best).

    >
    >I don't run a server. I do access webmail on one host server that gets
    >approximately 100 pieces of spam/day. I also run GoToMyPC and access my
    >machine from outisde on a somewhat regular basis.


    Is that host server part of your inner network? The fact that it's
    getting spam is not of concern. It can be a problem if it is not
    properly secured or the software has known vulnerabilities to which
    there is no patch. Then your whole network could be at risk.

    GoToMyPC allows remote access to your PC which is a weak link.
    www.Secunia.com has no advisory warnings for it which is good. I would
    much rather have a VPN based solution but if you've done your research
    with it I see no problems.

    >> As a heavy home user do you install and experiment with a lot of stuff
    >> from non mainstream sources? If you're not installing stuff regularly,
    >> it tends to go the overkill side.

    >
    >I don't install a lot of non-mainstream stuff as I always try to be
    >careful. I run Firefox, Trillium, and several small utilities such as a
    >batch file creator, but nothing really "experimental".


    If your box is stable and you won't be installing anything (specially
    freeware/shareware stuff) you could start contemplating the
    possibility to eliminate applications that monitor this area.
    Anti-spyware, personal firewalls, anti-trojans, etc. But only if you
    are not on a local network. Do you have wireless access points? WEP
    128-bits is a joke, crackable by script kiddies in 15 minutes.
    Security is not that simple.

    >> I would ditch Outlook, but that's more of a precaution than a
    >> necessity. You should be alright but you never know where the next
    >> security flaw is going to be. And be certain there will be.

    >
    >I love Outlook and have used it happily for many years. It syncs with
    >my Palm Pilot and although I know it's "risky", I don't want to part
    >with it. I'm running Avast on the high setting for Outlook and I use
    >SpamBayes. Beyond that, I never open attachments without scanning them
    >and I hope I stay safe. I do keep a few Ghost image backups about 3
    >weeks apart from one another.


    Those precautions are fine but they apply to any email client. In the
    past, vulnerabilities specific to Outlook have allowed infection by
    doing nothing! And today the danger is not only in the attachments but
    the links. That's how phishing scams have become so widespread.
    Anti-virus technology relies heavily on signatures, which means it
    must be identified beforehand. I'd say the likelihood of getting a
    0day infection from Outllook is higher than for any other email
    client. You are taking your chances, but at least you know it.

    >So, with the above clarifications. You suggested I might be on the
    >"overkill side", and that is my suspicion as well. What would you not
    >run, or not leave running, to reduce the "overkill"?


    It could be overkill, but it could be "underkill"! My main objective
    was to show you that there are many points of vulnerabilities and some
    are not fixed by simply installing applications. You could need more
    depending on what you are doing! :))

    You appear to be a knowledgable user so how about this for an answer.
    If you want to cut something out, the software firewall is a potential
    candidate. The Linksys router is doing the main part and you are not
    installing new stuff. The anti-spyware I also consider optional if you
    are not installing programs. The Anti-virus could go for the same
    reason but these days they do a lot more than detecting traditional
    viruses. For example, they take care of evil Java/Javascript malware
    from clicking websites and worms. You must have something for those.

    One more tip. Install Process Explorer from www.sysinternals.com and
    check how much resources your system is currently using right now.
    Vendors are much concerned about this nowadays and you might even be
    surprised.
    speeder, Jul 14, 2005
    #9
  10. Louise

    Louise Guest

    In article <JHaBe.6251$zj4.3048@trndny06>, DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net
    says...
    > From: "Louise" <>
    >
    > | Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    > | with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    > | email/pim.
    > |
    > | I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    > | software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    > |
    > | I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    > | the shields active.
    > |
    > | I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    > | every week or so.
    > |
    > | I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and I'm
    > | once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on guard" all
    > | the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.
    > |
    > | Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    > | inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?
    > |
    > | TIA
    > |
    > | Louise
    >
    > The software sounds fine.
    >
    > However, I do suggest the you block both TCP and UDP ports 135 ~ 139 and 445 on the Router.
    >
    > Depending on the model and version, the settings are at the following URL...
    > http://192.168.1.1/Filters.htm
    >
    >

    Thanks.

    Could you tell me what these ports are sometimes used for (other than
    "bad" things)?

    I just want to be sure I'm not blocking something I use and want.

    Louise
    Louise, Jul 14, 2005
    #10
  11. Louise

    DavidPostill Guest

    In article <>, on Thu, 14 Jul 2005 00:08:06 -0400, Louise
    wrote:

    {}

    | Could you tell me what these ports are sometimes used for (other than
    | "bad" things)?
    |
    | I just want to be sure I'm not blocking something I use and want.

    <http://www.commodon.com/threat/threat-allports.htm>
    <http://ports.tantalo.net/>
    <http://www.iss.net/security_center/advice/Exploits/Ports/>
    <http://www.sans.org/resources/idfaq/oddports.php>
    <http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/~rakerman/port-table.html>
    --
    DavidPostill
    DavidPostill, Jul 14, 2005
    #11
  12. <cut>
    >
    >Is there something I could do to just clean out temp files and other
    >odds and ends that wouldn't want to do more than I need or want?
    >
    >Louise


    You do fine, better than most. You know a lot. Share your knowledge.

    Take a look at the configuration of Crap Cleaner or Be Clean. You can
    set it up do do exactly and only what you want. You can ad a specific
    map to be cleaned. And both offer the possibility to clean up
    automatically when you close down your pc.

    I've got - since many many years now - a terribly good feeling about
    Be Clean, but I have to admit that since it's last upgrades, Crap
    Cleaner has become equally good. Be Clean is not updated anymore, so
    the advantage is that you will not be surprized. I wrote the author
    few times but he does not answer. Crap Cleaner is updated regularly,
    it works fine and also known since years but I have no idea who is
    behind this brilliant piece of software. So I remain - as always -
    prudent after every upgrade... and so should you every time a (free)
    program upgrades.





    --
    www.nondisputandum.com - soft reviews:
    freeware to Protect & Clean your PC
    freeware Office tools & Webbuilding aid
    + the Internet Addiction Test ;-)
    nondisputandum, Jul 14, 2005
    #12
  13. On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 17:11:31 -0400, Louise <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > says...
    >> On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 10:04:36 -0400, Louise <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    >> >with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    >> >email/pim.
    >> >
    >> >I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    >> >software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    >> >
    >> >I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    >> >the shields active.
    >> >
    >> >I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my machine
    >> >every week or so.

    >>
    >> It all depends on what sort of internet lifestyle you have.
    >>
    >> You say you are a heavy office user, what does that mean? Do you run
    >> web/mail/proxy/mySQL servers for example? Vulnerabilities in server
    >> software could allow an intruder to completely own your box despite
    >> the things you have right now. For this kind of situation you want to
    >> look into things such as hardening your server/OS and using security
    >> apps that monitor processes and prevent hijacking (ProcessGuard is
    >> absolutely the best).

    >
    >I don't run a server. I do access webmail on one host server that gets
    >approximately 100 pieces of spam/day. I also run GoToMyPC and access my
    >machine from outisde on a somewhat regular basis.
    >>
    >> As a heavy home user do you install and experiment with a lot of stuff
    >> from non mainstream sources? If you're not installing stuff regularly,
    >> it tends to go the overkill side.

    >
    >I don't install a lot of non-mainstream stuff as I always try to be
    >careful. I run Firefox, Trillium, and several small utilities such as a
    >batch file creator, but nothing really "experimental".
    >
    >>
    >> I would ditch Outlook, but that's more of a precaution than a
    >> necessity. You should be alright but you never know where the next
    >> security flaw is going to be. And be certain there will be.

    >
    >I love Outlook and have used it happily for many years. It syncs with
    >my Palm Pilot and although I know it's "risky", I don't want to part
    >with it. I'm running Avast on the high setting for Outlook and I use
    >SpamBayes. Beyond that, I never open attachments without scanning them
    >and I hope I stay safe. I do keep a few Ghost image backups about 3
    >weeks apart from one another.


    I also use (among other) Outlook. It serves me well. Besides, it is
    heavily used in professional context,.. so onece on gets used to it...
    Secundo: En aexample, the Mozilla mailclient is certainly safer,.. but
    less potent than Outlook. A user of Outlook Express would gain by
    switching to another mailclient, not a user of Outlook imho.

    >>
    >> Rootkit technology is only in its infancy so be on the lookout for new
    >> preventive measures as this evolves. Right now, I think only
    >> ProcessGuard type apps would be effective against it.
    >>

    >So, with the above clarifications. You suggested I might be on the
    >"overkill side", and that is my suspicion as well. What would you not
    >run, or not leave running, to reduce the "overkill"?
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >Louise



    --
    www.nondisputandum.com - soft reviews:
    freeware to Protect & Clean your PC
    freeware Office tools & Webbuilding aid
    + the Internet Addiction Test ;-)
    nondisputandum, Jul 14, 2005
    #13
  14. Louise

    Louise Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > <cut>
    > >
    > >Is there something I could do to just clean out temp files and other
    > >odds and ends that wouldn't want to do more than I need or want?
    > >
    > >Louise

    >
    > You do fine, better than most. You know a lot. Share your knowledge.
    >
    > Take a look at the configuration of Crap Cleaner or Be Clean. You can
    > set it up do do exactly and only what you want. You can ad a specific
    > map to be cleaned. And both offer the possibility to clean up
    > automatically when you close down your pc.
    >
    > I've got - since many many years now - a terribly good feeling about
    > Be Clean, but I have to admit that since it's last upgrades, Crap
    > Cleaner has become equally good. Be Clean is not updated anymore, so
    > the advantage is that you will not be surprized. I wrote the author
    > few times but he does not answer. Crap Cleaner is updated regularly,
    > it works fine and also known since years but I have no idea who is
    > behind this brilliant piece of software. So I remain - as always -
    > prudent after every upgrade... and so should you every time a (free)
    > program upgrades.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks - I kind of liked the feel of the Be Clean homepage better and
    now you've given me a better reason to choose it.

    Louise
    Louise, Jul 14, 2005
    #14
  15. From: "Louise" <>


    | Thanks.
    |
    | Could you tell me what these ports are sometimes used for (other than
    | "bad" things)?
    |
    | I just want to be sure I'm not blocking something I use and want.
    |
    | Louise

    Sure...

    Port 135 -- Remote Procedure Call (RPC) and Location Service (loc-srv) -- used by the MS
    Networking for various functionalities.

    Port 136 -- nothing uses this port and it is easier to exclude the range, inclusive of this
    port, than to enter the exact ports.

    Ports 137, 138 and 139 -- NetBIOS over IP, the main component of MS Networking to access
    File and Print Shares.

    Port 445 -- Microsoft-DS, Used for Server Message Blocks and other MS Networking constructs
    on Win2K, WinXP and Win2003 Server.

    None of these ports are used for normal Internet access. They are used on the Local Area
    Network (LAN) to share data between computeers but are not (annd should not be open to) the
    Internet or the Wide Area Network (WAN).

    By putting those plocks in hackers and Internet worms won't enter the LAN and no MS
    Networking can leak out onto the WAN. A simple but effective protection.



    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    David H. Lipman, Jul 14, 2005
    #15
  16. Louise

    Louise Guest

    In article <zNtBe.3634$WA4.959@trndny04>, DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net
    says...
    > From: "Louise" <>
    >
    >
    > | Thanks.
    > |
    > | Could you tell me what these ports are sometimes used for (other than
    > | "bad" things)?
    > |
    > | I just want to be sure I'm not blocking something I use and want.
    > |
    > | Louise
    >
    > Sure...
    >
    > Port 135 -- Remote Procedure Call (RPC) and Location Service (loc-srv) -- used by the MS
    > Networking for various functionalities.
    >
    > Port 136 -- nothing uses this port and it is easier to exclude the range, inclusive of this
    > port, than to enter the exact ports.
    >
    > Ports 137, 138 and 139 -- NetBIOS over IP, the main component of MS Networking to access
    > File and Print Shares.
    >
    > Port 445 -- Microsoft-DS, Used for Server Message Blocks and other MS Networking constructs
    > on Win2K, WinXP and Win2003 Server.
    >
    > None of these ports are used for normal Internet access. They are used on the Local Area
    > Network (LAN) to share data between computeers but are not (annd should not be open to) the
    > Internet or the Wide Area Network (WAN).
    >
    > By putting those plocks in hackers and Internet worms won't enter the LAN and no MS
    > Networking can leak out onto the WAN. A simple but effective protection.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks.

    Louise
    Louise, Jul 15, 2005
    #16
  17. On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 17:11:31 -0400, Louise <> wrote:

    >> I would ditch Outlook, but that's more of a precaution than a
    >> necessity. You should be alright but you never know where the next
    >> security flaw is going to be. And be certain there will be.

    >
    >I love Outlook and have used it happily for many years. It syncs with
    >my Palm Pilot and although I know it's "risky", I don't want to part
    >with it.


    If you need Outlook only for the ability to sync with your PP, then
    know you can still use it for that purpose, while using a safer client
    for e-mail. I use Outlook to sync my calendar with my Kyocera phone,
    but use Pegasus exclusively for e-mail.
    The Ghost of General Lee, Jul 15, 2005
    #17
  18. The Ghost of General Lee <> wrote:

    > If you need Outlook only for the ability to sync with your PP, then
    > know you can still use it for that purpose, while using a safer client
    > for e-mail. I use Outlook to sync my calendar with my Kyocera phone,
    > but use Pegasus exclusively for e-mail.


    Why use Outlook at all, then? Unlike WinCE-devices, Palm Pilots offer
    you to install PalmDesktop - which does all that Outlook does, except
    for email.

    Juergen Nieveler
    --
    MONEY TALKS ... but all mine ever says is GOODBYE!
    Juergen Nieveler, Jul 15, 2005
    #18
  19. Louise

    Robsten Guest

    Författare Louise 2005-07-13 :
    > Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    > with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    > email/pim.


    > I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    > software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.


    > I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with all
    > the shields active.


    > I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my
    > machine every week or so.


    > I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and I'm
    > once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on guard" all
    > the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.


    > Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    > inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?


    > TIA


    > Louise


    I don.t think is overkill, you could use Thunderbird instead of OE and
    use moore than one spywaredetector, I recomend two or three. Use
    Antivir instead of Avast, its better.

    --
    http://w1.853.comhem.se/~u85329080/
    http://web.comhem.se/~u85329080/indexB.htm
    http://web.comhem.se/~u85329080/Freeware.htm
    And I don.t play golf
    Robsten, Jul 15, 2005
    #19
  20. Louise

    Robsten Guest

    Författare David H. Lipman 2005-07-13 :
    > From: "Louise" <>


    >> Win XP Pro, SP2 with MS firewall turned off. Heavy home/office user
    >> with cable ISP. Use Firefox 85% of the time. Use Outlook as my
    >> email/pim.
    >>
    >> I'm wondering whether I really need to run the amount of security
    >> software I'm running or whether it's taking too much overhead.
    >>
    >> I have a Linksys NAT router. I run Sygate Pro. I run Avast with
    >> all the shields active.
    >>
    >> I used to run Spysweeper only when I actually wanted to scan my
    >> machine every week or so.
    >>
    >> I've just switched to Spyware Doctor (was this a good idea?), and
    >> I'm once again wondering whether I should leave it running "on
    >> guard" all the time or whether it's unnecessary use of resources.
    >>
    >> Any thoughts about Spyware Doctor and is it bloated - does it use an
    >> inordinate amount of resources? Is it intrusive?
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> Louise


    > The software sounds fine.


    > However, I do suggest the you block both TCP and UDP ports 135 ~ 139
    > and 445 on the Router.


    > Depending on the model and version, the settings are at the following
    > URL... http://192.168.1.1/Filters.htm


    Why not block every port apart from them you use???

    --
    http://w1.853.comhem.se/~u85329080/
    http://web.comhem.se/~u85329080/indexB.htm
    http://web.comhem.se/~u85329080/Freeware.htm
    And I don.t play golf
    Robsten, Jul 15, 2005
    #20
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