security enabled wireless network

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=, Dec 17, 2005.

  1. In my home my computer detects 4 wireless networks, one of which is mine. The
    other three say that they are securety enabled wireless networks. Mine does
    not. What is security enabling and how do I do create it for my own network?
    =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=, Dec 17, 2005
    #1
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  2. security enabled means that your information and your internet is not
    accesible by any other persons than you(exept for hackers)so this means that
    anyone near you is using your wireless internet service for free while you
    pay for it. there are 2 basic types of security 1. WEP 2.WPA (WPA being much
    better than WEP) to enable security on your network you can use the wireless
    network setup wizard in the control pannel section on your computer. if you
    can, try to use the WPA encryption, if you cant just settle for WEP. After
    you have setup the network you will need to be able to access your router
    through your computer to input the wireless network key into your router.

    "GeorgeR" wrote:

    > In my home my computer detects 4 wireless networks, one of which is mine. The
    > other three say that they are securety enabled wireless networks. Mine does
    > not. What is security enabling and how do I do create it for my own network?
    =?Utf-8?B?amFtZXM=?=, Dec 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. Thank you James. I have gone through the setup process and used WPA. The one
    part of the process that didn't go as my computer wanted was when it asked me
    to connect the USB storage device into the router. There is no USB port on
    the router. In your note you mentioned accessing it through the computer to
    set it up. How do I do that? Thanks again.

    "james" wrote:

    > security enabled means that your information and your internet is not
    > accesible by any other persons than you(exept for hackers)so this means that
    > anyone near you is using your wireless internet service for free while you
    > pay for it. there are 2 basic types of security 1. WEP 2.WPA (WPA being much
    > better than WEP) to enable security on your network you can use the wireless
    > network setup wizard in the control pannel section on your computer. if you
    > can, try to use the WPA encryption, if you cant just settle for WEP. After
    > you have setup the network you will need to be able to access your router
    > through your computer to input the wireless network key into your router.
    >
    > "GeorgeR" wrote:
    >
    > > In my home my computer detects 4 wireless networks, one of which is mine. The
    > > other three say that they are securety enabled wireless networks. Mine does
    > > not. What is security enabling and how do I do create it for my own network?
    =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=, Dec 17, 2005
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=

    Lem Guest

    Routers typically are configured through a web interface that you access
    by directing your browser -- preferably connected to the router by cable
    while making configuration changes -- to the IP address of the router.
    You'll have to check your manual for the default IP address. For most
    Linksys routers, it is 192.168.1.1

    I've never used the "network setup wizard" but if you truly set up WPA
    on your computer but not on your router, you probably can't connect
    wirelessly. In order to connect wirelessly, both the computer and
    router must use the same level of encryption (WEP, WPA-PSK, WPA-AES,
    WPA2) and have the same "key" or password.

    Are you sure the "wizard" asked you to connect the USB device to the
    router (and not, for example, to another computer that you wanted to
    have the same wireless setup)?


    GeorgeR wrote:

    > Thank you James. I have gone through the setup process and used WPA. The one
    > part of the process that didn't go as my computer wanted was when it asked me
    > to connect the USB storage device into the router. There is no USB port on
    > the router. In your note you mentioned accessing it through the computer to
    > set it up. How do I do that? Thanks again.
    >
    > "james" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>security enabled means that your information and your internet is not
    >>accesible by any other persons than you(exept for hackers)so this means that
    >>anyone near you is using your wireless internet service for free while you
    >>pay for it. there are 2 basic types of security 1. WEP 2.WPA (WPA being much
    >>better than WEP) to enable security on your network you can use the wireless
    >>network setup wizard in the control pannel section on your computer. if you
    >>can, try to use the WPA encryption, if you cant just settle for WEP. After
    >>you have setup the network you will need to be able to access your router
    >>through your computer to input the wireless network key into your router.
    >>
    >>"GeorgeR" wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>In my home my computer detects 4 wireless networks, one of which is mine. The
    >>>other three say that they are securety enabled wireless networks. Mine does
    >>>not. What is security enabling and how do I do create it for my own network?
    Lem, Dec 17, 2005
    #4
  5. when i use the wizard i choose to manually setup the rest of the network then
    before clicking the finish button at the end it will give you a "print
    network settings" option, click that and you should find your network key and
    other information in a wordpad document.

    "Lem" wrote:

    > Routers typically are configured through a web interface that you access
    > by directing your browser -- preferably connected to the router by cable
    > while making configuration changes -- to the IP address of the router.
    > You'll have to check your manual for the default IP address. For most
    > Linksys routers, it is 192.168.1.1
    >
    > I've never used the "network setup wizard" but if you truly set up WPA
    > on your computer but not on your router, you probably can't connect
    > wirelessly. In order to connect wirelessly, both the computer and
    > router must use the same level of encryption (WEP, WPA-PSK, WPA-AES,
    > WPA2) and have the same "key" or password.
    >
    > Are you sure the "wizard" asked you to connect the USB device to the
    > router (and not, for example, to another computer that you wanted to
    > have the same wireless setup)?
    >
    >
    > GeorgeR wrote:
    >
    > > Thank you James. I have gone through the setup process and used WPA. The one
    > > part of the process that didn't go as my computer wanted was when it asked me
    > > to connect the USB storage device into the router. There is no USB port on
    > > the router. In your note you mentioned accessing it through the computer to
    > > set it up. How do I do that? Thanks again.
    > >
    > > "james" wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>security enabled means that your information and your internet is not
    > >>accesible by any other persons than you(exept for hackers)so this means that
    > >>anyone near you is using your wireless internet service for free while you
    > >>pay for it. there are 2 basic types of security 1. WEP 2.WPA (WPA being much
    > >>better than WEP) to enable security on your network you can use the wireless
    > >>network setup wizard in the control pannel section on your computer. if you
    > >>can, try to use the WPA encryption, if you cant just settle for WEP. After
    > >>you have setup the network you will need to be able to access your router
    > >>through your computer to input the wireless network key into your router.
    > >>
    > >>"GeorgeR" wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>In my home my computer detects 4 wireless networks, one of which is mine. The
    > >>>other three say that they are securety enabled wireless networks. Mine does
    > >>>not. What is security enabling and how do I do create it for my own network?

    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?amFtZXM=?=, Dec 17, 2005
    #5
  6. Thank you both. Well after about 5 hours of messing around with this I have
    created a security enabled wireless network. Honestly, I would never have
    been able do it without closely reading the manual that came with the router.
    I basically had to start over from scratch and did it all through the
    192.168.1.1 site and then configuring the laptop.

    What still puzzles me though is that there is now a new network with the
    same strength as my SSID network that is unsecured. Its name is linksys. It
    is almost as though there is a second network being broadcast from my router.
    Is that possible? If so, how do I kill it?

    "james" wrote:

    > when i use the wizard i choose to manually setup the rest of the network then
    > before clicking the finish button at the end it will give you a "print
    > network settings" option, click that and you should find your network key and
    > other information in a wordpad document.
    >
    > "Lem" wrote:
    >
    > > Routers typically are configured through a web interface that you access
    > > by directing your browser -- preferably connected to the router by cable
    > > while making configuration changes -- to the IP address of the router.
    > > You'll have to check your manual for the default IP address. For most
    > > Linksys routers, it is 192.168.1.1
    > >
    > > I've never used the "network setup wizard" but if you truly set up WPA
    > > on your computer but not on your router, you probably can't connect
    > > wirelessly. In order to connect wirelessly, both the computer and
    > > router must use the same level of encryption (WEP, WPA-PSK, WPA-AES,
    > > WPA2) and have the same "key" or password.
    > >
    > > Are you sure the "wizard" asked you to connect the USB device to the
    > > router (and not, for example, to another computer that you wanted to
    > > have the same wireless setup)?
    > >
    > >
    > > GeorgeR wrote:
    > >
    > > > Thank you James. I have gone through the setup process and used WPA. The one
    > > > part of the process that didn't go as my computer wanted was when it asked me
    > > > to connect the USB storage device into the router. There is no USB port on
    > > > the router. In your note you mentioned accessing it through the computer to
    > > > set it up. How do I do that? Thanks again.
    > > >
    > > > "james" wrote:
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >>security enabled means that your information and your internet is not
    > > >>accesible by any other persons than you(exept for hackers)so this means that
    > > >>anyone near you is using your wireless internet service for free while you
    > > >>pay for it. there are 2 basic types of security 1. WEP 2.WPA (WPA being much
    > > >>better than WEP) to enable security on your network you can use the wireless
    > > >>network setup wizard in the control pannel section on your computer. if you
    > > >>can, try to use the WPA encryption, if you cant just settle for WEP. After
    > > >>you have setup the network you will need to be able to access your router
    > > >>through your computer to input the wireless network key into your router.
    > > >>
    > > >>"GeorgeR" wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >>>In my home my computer detects 4 wireless networks, one of which is mine. The
    > > >>>other three say that they are securety enabled wireless networks. Mine does
    > > >>>not. What is security enabling and how do I do create it for my own network?

    > >
    > >
    =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=, Dec 19, 2005
    #6
  7. =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=

    johnny Guest

    On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 01:49:02 -0800, GeorgeR wrote:

    > Thank you both. Well after about 5 hours of messing around with this I have
    > created a security enabled wireless network. Honestly, I would never have
    > been able do it without closely reading the manual that came with the router.
    > I basically had to start over from scratch and did it all through the
    > 192.168.1.1 site and then configuring the laptop.
    >
    > What still puzzles me though is that there is now a new network with the
    > same strength as my SSID network that is unsecured. Its name is linksys. It
    > is almost as though there is a second network being broadcast from my router.
    > Is that possible? If so, how do I kill it?


    It's probably a neighbor's router. The neighbor apparently is going with
    the default SSID. One of you will have to change channels to avoid
    the interference.

    >
    > "james" wrote:
    >
    >> when i use the wizard i choose to manually setup the rest of the
    >> network then before clicking the finish button at the end it will give
    >> you a "print network settings" option, click that and you should find
    >> your network key and other information in a wordpad document.
    >>
    >> "Lem" wrote:
    >>
    >> > Routers typically are configured through a web interface that you
    >> > access by directing your browser -- preferably connected to the
    >> > router by cable while making configuration changes -- to the IP
    >> > address of the router. You'll have to check your manual for the
    >> > default IP address. For most Linksys routers, it is 192.168.1.1
    >> >
    >> > I've never used the "network setup wizard" but if you truly set up
    >> > WPA on your computer but not on your router, you probably can't
    >> > connect wirelessly. In order to connect wirelessly, both the
    >> > computer and router must use the same level of encryption (WEP,
    >> > WPA-PSK, WPA-AES, WPA2) and have the same "key" or password.
    >> >
    >> > Are you sure the "wizard" asked you to connect the USB device to the
    >> > router (and not, for example, to another computer that you wanted to
    >> > have the same wireless setup)?
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > GeorgeR wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > Thank you James. I have gone through the setup process and used
    >> > > WPA. The one part of the process that didn't go as my computer
    >> > > wanted was when it asked me to connect the USB storage device into
    >> > > the router. There is no USB port on the router. In your note you
    >> > > mentioned accessing it through the computer to set it up. How do I
    >> > > do that? Thanks again.
    >> > >
    >> > > "james" wrote:
    >> > >
    >> > >
    >> > >>security enabled means that your information and your internet is
    >> > >>not accesible by any other persons than you(exept for hackers)so
    >> > >>this means that anyone near you is using your wireless internet
    >> > >>service for free while you pay for it. there are 2 basic types of
    >> > >>security 1. WEP 2.WPA (WPA being much better than WEP) to enable
    >> > >>security on your network you can use the wireless network setup
    >> > >>wizard in the control pannel section on your computer. if you can,
    >> > >>try to use the WPA encryption, if you cant just settle for WEP.
    >> > >>After you have setup the network you will need to be able to access
    >> > >>your router through your computer to input the wireless network key
    >> > >>into your router.
    >> > >>
    >> > >>"GeorgeR" wrote:
    >> > >>
    >> > >>
    >> > >>>In my home my computer detects 4 wireless networks, one of which
    >> > >>>is mine. The other three say that they are securety enabled
    >> > >>>wireless networks. Mine does not. What is security enabling and
    >> > >>>how do I do create it for my own network?
    >> >
    >> >
    johnny, Dec 20, 2005
    #7
  8. =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=

    Malke Guest

    johnny wrote:

    > On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 01:49:02 -0800, GeorgeR wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you both. Well after about 5 hours of messing around with this
    >> I have created a security enabled wireless network. Honestly, I would
    >> never have been able do it without closely reading the manual that
    >> came with the router. I basically had to start over from scratch and
    >> did it all through the 192.168.1.1 site and then configuring the
    >> laptop.
    >>
    >> What still puzzles me though is that there is now a new network with
    >> the same strength as my SSID network that is unsecured. Its name is
    >> linksys. It is almost as though there is a second network being
    >> broadcast from my router. Is that possible? If so, how do I kill it?

    >
    > It's probably a neighbor's router. The neighbor apparently is going
    > with the default SSID. One of you will have to change channels to
    > avoid the interference.


    George doesn't need to change the channel. He needs to change his SSID
    from the default Linksys to something he likes. Then he can set his
    network to Preferred and check "only connect to preferred networks".

    Malke
    --
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic!"
    MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
    Malke, Dec 20, 2005
    #8
  9. I have changed my SSID and my laptop always selects my network which is the
    preferred network. I just wanted to make sure that I had not accidently set
    up a second unsecured network broadcast in the area. I think that johnny is
    right because sometimes I see the Lynksis network as available and sometimes
    I don't . Thank you all very much.

    "Malke" wrote:

    > johnny wrote:
    >
    > > On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 01:49:02 -0800, GeorgeR wrote:
    > >
    > >> Thank you both. Well after about 5 hours of messing around with this
    > >> I have created a security enabled wireless network. Honestly, I would
    > >> never have been able do it without closely reading the manual that
    > >> came with the router. I basically had to start over from scratch and
    > >> did it all through the 192.168.1.1 site and then configuring the
    > >> laptop.
    > >>
    > >> What still puzzles me though is that there is now a new network with
    > >> the same strength as my SSID network that is unsecured. Its name is
    > >> linksys. It is almost as though there is a second network being
    > >> broadcast from my router. Is that possible? If so, how do I kill it?

    > >
    > > It's probably a neighbor's router. The neighbor apparently is going
    > > with the default SSID. One of you will have to change channels to
    > > avoid the interference.

    >
    > George doesn't need to change the channel. He needs to change his SSID
    > from the default Linksys to something he likes. Then he can set his
    > network to Preferred and check "only connect to preferred networks".
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > Elephant Boy Computers
    > www.elephantboycomputers.com
    > "Don't Panic!"
    > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?R2VvcmdlUg==?=, Dec 22, 2005
    #9
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