SCSI Drive that fast?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Saddles, Jan 7, 2004.

  1. Saddles

    Saddles Guest

    In my free time (between teaching) I kind of look after ten computers in my
    school's library. They're of different makes with different components, but
    all run Windows Xp and are set up and tweaked similarly, defragged and
    everything. Clock speeds range from 700Mhz to 1.9 Ghz. The curious thing
    is the 700Mhz one appears to run MUCH faster than all the rest. I don't
    have much time to play technician, but I suspected this one must have a SCSI
    drive. Checked, and it had a SCSI controller installed tho' it was flagged
    as having a problem. Could someone comment on three things? How do I
    recognize the drive specs as being SCSI? (Can I *know* that the controller
    is for the hard drive?). Will the SCSI drive alone account for such speed?
    How come I'm geting this speed if the controller has a problem? Why is
    there so little mention of the fact that using a SCSI drive by far outweighs
    any other method of increasing speed (It seems to me)? I mean, the layman
    doesn't need processing speed as much as disk access speed- at every turn -
    disk access.Any comments?
    Saddles, Jan 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Saddles

    ICee Guest

    Saddles wrote:
    > In my free time (between teaching) I kind of look after ten computers
    > in my school's library. They're of different makes with different
    > components, but all run Windows Xp and are set up and tweaked
    > similarly, defragged and everything. Clock speeds range from 700Mhz
    > to 1.9 Ghz. The curious thing is the 700Mhz one appears to run MUCH
    > faster than all the rest. I don't have much time to play technician,
    > but I suspected this one must have a SCSI drive. Checked, and it had
    > a SCSI controller installed tho' it was flagged as having a problem.
    > Could someone comment on three things? How do I recognize the drive
    > specs as being SCSI? (Can I *know* that the controller is for the
    > hard drive?). Will the SCSI drive alone account for such speed? How
    > come I'm geting this speed if the controller has a problem? Why is
    > there so little mention of the fact that using a SCSI drive by far
    > outweighs any other method of increasing speed (It seems to me)? I
    > mean, the layman doesn't need processing speed as much as disk access
    > speed- at every turn - disk access.Any comments?


    SCSI drives are typically 10,000 RPM and a SCSI interface transfers data
    much faster than the standard 7200 RPM ATA drive (or 5400 RPM with older
    drives).
    They are also *much* more expensive compared to "standard" ATA drives.

    --
    "I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by."
    Douglas Adams
    ICee, Jan 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. Saddles wrote:

    > In my free time (between teaching) I kind of look after ten computers in my
    > school's library. They're of different makes with different components, but
    > all run Windows Xp and are set up and tweaked similarly, defragged and
    > everything. Clock speeds range from 700Mhz to 1.9 Ghz. The curious thing
    > is the 700Mhz one appears to run MUCH faster than all the rest. I don't
    > have much time to play technician, but I suspected this one must have a SCSI
    > drive. Checked, and it had a SCSI controller installed tho' it was flagged
    > as having a problem. Could someone comment on three things? How do I
    > recognize the drive specs as being SCSI? (Can I *know* that the controller
    > is for the hard drive?). Will the SCSI drive alone account for such speed?
    > How come I'm geting this speed if the controller has a problem? Why is
    > there so little mention of the fact that using a SCSI drive by far outweighs
    > any other method of increasing speed (It seems to me)? I mean, the layman
    > doesn't need processing speed as much as disk access speed- at every turn -
    > disk access.Any comments?


    Ho, yeah - LOTs of comments will come down about this... Here's a few
    from me.

    If you go into Device Manager again, look at the catagory "Disk Drives".
    You'll be able to see what HD's are installed / running. Most IDE drives
    should say they are IDE. (If worse comes to worse, a simple web-search
    on the drive's info should tell you.)

    Can SCSI account for the speed difference? "No and yes" - SCSI drives
    can be lightning quick thereby speeding up SwapFile access, giving the
    appearence of being faster than another (slower HD) computer. Depends on
    the drive, really.

    As to why SCSI isn't mentioned as much is simple: FUD (fear,
    uncertainty, Doubt). Some people think setting up SCSI is Archane Black
    Voodoo Magic (c)/(tm) used by Mac-Heads, ServerGods, *nix-weirdos and
    Super-high-End-Digital-video-Editing weenies and think a "SCSI WORM
    Drive" is a deep-dark secret that should be PH33R'D.

    The truth is, SCSI is a fairly simple and reliable system to set up
    *IF!* you follow the 3 simple rules of ID #, Position in chain, and
    termination.

    Don't get me wrong, I've used SCSI on WinTel boxes, Macs, hell my Amiga
    2000 came with a 100 MB SCSI HardCard (drive mounted on the controller)
    and never once have I had a setup problem, or a catastrophic crash that
    couldn't be recovered from. (not to mention Scanners!)

    Besides, think of all the data you can push with a WideSCSI-3 Raid setup!

    --
    --

    BuffNET Technical Support Supervisor
    (BEHOLD! The power of the BOFH!)
    BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ, Jan 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Saddles

    Trax Guest

    On Wed, 7 Jan 2004 04:32:42 -0500, "Saddles"
    <mymungeis_memarks_ot_coralwave_ot_com> wrote:

    |> Why is
    |>there so little mention of the fact that using a SCSI drive by far outweighs
    |>any other method of increasing speed (It seems to me)? I mean, the layman
    |>doesn't need processing speed as much as disk access speed- at every turn -
    |>disk access.Any comments?

    Marketing. :) I think alot has to do with the backward compatibility of the IBM.

    SCSI's are the way to go none of this two drives per cable, just chain them
    together, and did I mention fast.
    --
    ,,
    ( "> w
    ,(> )>| TACTICS: Breath freshener for dyslexics.
    ( ^^ '
    Trax, Jan 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Saddles

    Trax Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 17:12:37 -0500, BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ
    <> wrote:

    |>Don't get me wrong, I've used SCSI on WinTel boxes, Macs, hell my Amiga
    |>2000 came with a 100 MB SCSI HardCard (drive mounted on the controller)
    |>and never once have I had a setup problem, or a catastrophic crash that
    |>couldn't be recovered from. (not to mention Scanners!)

    Ahhh a new AmigA user. You must of started at 1.3 or later. I came in at 1.2
    and had to use a floppy disk to boot up my hard drive :)

    Robotics tech support hung up on me one time, gave me the modem strings I needed
    and told me to reboot. I say ok this will only take 5 mins...Dead air.
    --
    ,,
    ( "> w
    ,(> )>| TACTICS: Breath freshener for dyslexics.
    ( ^^ '
    Trax, Jan 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Howdy!

    "Saddles" <mymungeis_memarks_ot_coralwave_ot_com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In my free time (between teaching) I kind of look after ten computers in

    my
    > school's library. They're of different makes with different components,

    but
    > all run Windows Xp and are set up and tweaked similarly, defragged and
    > everything. Clock speeds range from 700Mhz to 1.9 Ghz. The curious thing
    > is the 700Mhz one appears to run MUCH faster than all the rest. I don't
    > have much time to play technician, but I suspected this one must have a

    SCSI
    > drive. Checked, and it had a SCSI controller installed tho' it was

    flagged
    > as having a problem. Could someone comment on three things? How do I
    > recognize the drive specs as being SCSI? (Can I *know* that the controller
    > is for the hard drive?). Will the SCSI drive alone account for such speed?
    > How come I'm geting this speed if the controller has a problem? Why is
    > there so little mention of the fact that using a SCSI drive by far

    outweighs
    > any other method of increasing speed (It seems to me)? I mean, the layman
    > doesn't need processing speed as much as disk access speed- at every

    turn -
    > disk access.Any comments?


    There's a good chance that you've got IDE drives on an IDE host
    adapter using the SCSI MiniPort to link to the NT HAL ...

    For instance, my Promise Ultra 100/TX2 lists as a "SCSI" host
    adapter, since it uses the SCSI MiniPort software hooks.

    RwP
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Jan 9, 2004
    #6
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