Scoring

Discussion in 'MCSA' started by RogueIT, May 12, 2008.

  1. RogueIT

    RogueIT Guest

    I know that microsoft scoring is one of the mysteries of the universe but I
    was wondering if any one could attempt a guess at how many of the 47
    questions I missed, If I made a 606 on the test.
    thanks,
    Rogue
     
    RogueIT, May 12, 2008
    #1
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  2. RogueIT

    JohnB Guest

    If I'm not mistaken, the final score represents your percentage of correct
    scores.
    Just like in school, if there were 100 questions and you answered 80 right,
    the formula would be 80/100= .80 or an 80

    So for you it would be:
    (number of right answers) / (number of questions) = 606

    Or more correctly, a .606

    so the formula would be x/47=.606

    With X = 28.482 (correct answers)
    and 47-28=19 (approximately)

    So you got about 19 questions wrong.


    "RogueIT" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I know that microsoft scoring is one of the mysteries of the universe but I
    > was wondering if any one could attempt a guess at how many of the 47
    > questions I missed, If I made a 606 on the test.
    > thanks,
    > Rogue
     
    JohnB, May 12, 2008
    #2
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  3. RogueIT

    RogueIT Guest

    I knew I did better on the test that that...
    I probably only missed one question...the one that counts as 400 magical
    microsoft points...
    %&^$% IT!!!
    Oh well...I got a "2nd shot"
     
    RogueIT, May 12, 2008
    #3
  4. RogueIT

    John R Guest

    "catwalker63" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9A9C681A36Dcatwalker63athotmail@216.196.97.136...
    > "JohnB" <> prattled ceaselessly in
    > news:#:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "RogueIT" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I know that microsoft scoring is one of the mysteries of the universe
    >>>but I
    >>> was wondering if any one could attempt a guess at how many of the 47
    >>> questions I missed, If I made a 606 on the test.
    >>> thanks,
    >>> Rogue

    >>
    >> If I'm not mistaken, the final score represents your percentage of
    >> correct scores.
    >> Just like in school, if there were 100 questions and you answered 80
    >> right, the formula would be 80/100= .80 or an 80
    >>
    >> So for you it would be:
    >> (number of right answers) / (number of questions) = 606
    >>
    >> Or more correctly, a .606
    >>
    >> so the formula would be x/47=.606
    >>
    >> With X = 28.482 (correct answers)
    >> and 47-28=19 (approximately)
    >>
    >> So you got about 19 questions wrong.

    >
    >
    > You are mistaken. That would be correct if 606 represented a percentage
    > but it doesn't. MS has not published the possible score and they have
    > deliberately obfiscated the scoring process. Passing is 700 but it does
    > not represent 70% -- it represents the passing score, which is,
    > potentially, something else entirely. It's like Pass/Fail but more
    > confusing. Questions are possibly weighted, possibly not.
    >
    > --


    You don't even know how many of the 47 questions you were asked actually
    counted towards your final score. Some of them may have been beta questions
    that are not scored.

    John R
     
    John R, May 12, 2008
    #4
  5. RogueIT

    JohnB Guest

    Ok, I'm wrong. There's a first time for everything ;-)

    It's not surprising that Microsoft if making this so secretive but.... this
    raises the question; if everyone is saying it is an unknown, as far as how
    Microsoft scores their tests, how do we know it isn't simply based on a
    percentage, as I had guessed. I'm not having a hard time admitting I'm
    wrong... just wondering how anyone knows that they do in fact NOT use a
    basic percentage system.



    >> If I'm not mistaken, the final score represents your percentage of


    >
    >
    > You are mistaken. That would be correct if 606 represented a percentage
    > but it doesn't. MS has not published the possible score and they have
    > deliberately obfiscated the scoring process. Passing is 700 but it does
    > not represent 70% -- it represents the passing score, which is,
    > potentially, something else entirely. It's like Pass/Fail but more
    > confusing. Questions are possibly weighted, possibly not.
    >
    > --
    > Catwalker
    > MCNGP #43
    > www.mcngp.com
    > "Definitely not wearing any underwear."
     
    JohnB, May 12, 2008
    #5
  6. Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard, Inc.], May 13, 2008
    #6
  7. RogueIT

    John R Guest

    "JohnB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok, I'm wrong. There's a first time for everything ;-)
    >
    > It's not surprising that Microsoft if making this so secretive but....
    > this raises the question; if everyone is saying it is an unknown, as far
    > as how Microsoft scores their tests, how do we know it isn't simply based
    > on a percentage, as I had guessed. I'm not having a hard time admitting
    > I'm wrong... just wondering how anyone knows that they do in fact NOT use
    > a basic percentage system.
    >
    >


    Here is one of the FAQs on exams.
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcpexams/faq/preparing.mspx

    Here is an excerpt from that FAQ...
    "The different passing scores are statistically insignificant. For example,
    an examinee who scores 900 is not necessarily more knowledgeable in the
    exam's topic area than an examinee who scores 800."

    In a pure percentage situation, an examinee who scores 900 would have
    necessarily performed better than an examinee who scored 800. I suggest you
    read the entire FAQ. It may be all smoke and mirrors, we just don't know.
    Therefore, one cannot say with any reasonable amount of certainty that one
    is correct or the other. If it makes you feel better to believe you are
    correct, then by all means, have at it.

    John R
     
    John R, May 13, 2008
    #7
  8. RogueIT

    JaR Guest

    On 5/12/2008,JohnB had the unmitigated gall to claim:

    > Ok, I'm wrong. There's a first time for everything ;-)
    >
    > It's not surprising that Microsoft if making this so secretive
    > but.... this raises the question; if everyone is saying it is an
    > unknown, as far as how Microsoft scores their tests, how do we know
    > it isn't simply based on a percentage, as I had guessed. I'm not
    > having a hard time admitting I'm wrong... just wondering how anyone
    > knows that they do in fact NOT use a basic percentage system.
    >
    >
    >
    > > > If I'm not mistaken, the final score represents your percentage of

    >
    > >
    > >
    > > You are mistaken. That would be correct if 606 represented a
    > > percentage but it doesn't. MS has not published the possible score
    > > and they have deliberately obfiscated the scoring process. Passing
    > > is 700 but it does not represent 70% -- it represents the passing
    > > score, which is, potentially, something else entirely. It's like
    > > Pass/Fail but more confusing. Questions are possibly weighted,
    > > possibly not.
    > >
    > > -- Catwalker
    > > MCNGP #43
    > > www.mcngp.com
    > > "Definitely not wearing any underwear."


    We actually have had folks report scores >1000 in here. Hasn't happened
    very often, but it has happened.

    --
    JaR
    Just to completely confuse
    Remove hat to reply
     
    JaR, May 14, 2008
    #8
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