scare tactics

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by philo, Feb 29, 2008.

  1. philo

    philo Guest

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  2. philo

    richard Guest

    richard, Feb 29, 2008
    #2
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  3. philo

    Guest

    richard <> wrote:

    >Actually, that smoke detector in your home puts out more radiation
    >than your router does.


    A router, cell phone, any wireless device gives out microwaves, it
    cooks our food, but not our brains say Nokia and the rest.


    --

    http://www.onahorse.com/
    , Feb 29, 2008
    #3
  4. philo

    Old Gringo Guest

    On Or About Thu, 28 Feb 2008 19:09:52 -0600, Without Any Hesitation
    Or Thinking Twice, philo Stumbled Over To The Keyboard And wrote The
    Following In The 24hoursupport.helpdesk News Group:

    > http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/archive/2007-05-27--the-truth-about-wireless-devices.html


    LOL Aren't the RF signals from the routers in the same space as all
    the other stuff? Some where between channel 5 and 6 on your TV?
    --
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    http://www.NuBoy-Industries.Com
    2/28/2008 8:45:06 PM CST
    Old Gringo, Feb 29, 2008
    #4
  5. Pennywise wrote:

    > richard <> wrote:
    >
    >>Actually, that smoke detector in your home puts out more radiation
    >>than your router does.

    >
    > A router, cell phone, any wireless device gives out microwaves, it
    > cooks our food, but not our brains say Nokia and the rest.


    I probably won't be too worried about this issue until I buy a 1200-watt
    cell phone.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
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    Blinky the Shark, Feb 29, 2008
    #5
  6. philo

    Old Gringo Guest

    On Or About Thu, 28 Feb 2008 18:49:55 -0800, Without Any Hesitation
    Or Thinking Twice, Blinky the Shark Stumbled Over To The Keyboard And
    wrote The Following In The 24hoursupport.helpdesk News Group:

    > Pennywise wrote:
    >
    >> richard <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Actually, that smoke detector in your home puts out more radiation
    >>>than your router does.

    >>
    >> A router, cell phone, any wireless device gives out microwaves, it
    >> cooks our food, but not our brains say Nokia and the rest.

    >
    > I probably won't be too worried about this issue until I buy a 1200-watt
    > cell phone.


    Good one, LMFAO, hit me just right.
    --
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    http://www.NuBoy-Industries.Com
    2/28/2008 8:49:11 PM CST
    Old Gringo, Feb 29, 2008
    #6
  7. philo

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 18:35:56 -0800, wrote:

    > richard <> wrote:
    >
    >>Actually, that smoke detector in your home puts out more radiation
    >>than your router does.

    >
    >A router, cell phone, any wireless device gives out microwaves, it
    >cooks our food, but not our brains say Nokia and the rest.


    Duh. Microwave, for the uninformed, is a term used for extremely high
    radio waves. Although these devices may work in that range, the power
    output is nothing like that of a microwave oven or dish.
    The guy who invented the MW oven itself, said, he had noticed his
    candy bar had been "cooked" while he was working on the dish while it
    was in use. Ergo, if his candy bar had been "cooked", then why wasn't
    he?

    In order for a MW to have any effect upon the human body in any way,
    the output of such a device would have to have a minimum rating of
    1000 watts. If such a router existed, it would be 10 times the size of
    your desktop PC, and have a signal strength capable of 100 miles.

    Hmmmm. So like ok, I'll go build one of those puppies, advertise it,
    and sign up everyone for a 100 miles around.

    So who needs cable?

    could a 200kw router extend over 1000 miles?

    Or we could launch one in a satellite. Cover the entire country.

    Nahh. Never gonna happen.



    --

    A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.
    Mark Twain(attributed)
    richard, Feb 29, 2008
    #7
  8. philo

    Mara Guest

    Mara, Feb 29, 2008
    #8
  9. philo

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 20:47:34 -0600, Old Gringo
    <> wrote:

    >On Or About Thu, 28 Feb 2008 19:09:52 -0600, Without Any Hesitation
    >Or Thinking Twice, philo Stumbled Over To The Keyboard And wrote The
    >Following In The 24hoursupport.helpdesk News Group:
    >
    >> http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/archive/2007-05-27--the-truth-about-wireless-devices.html

    >
    >LOL Aren't the RF signals from the routers in the same space as all
    >the other stuff? Some where between channel 5 and 6 on your TV?



    No. TV signals are in the HF and the UHF range.
    channel 5 is 77.25 mhz
    With uhf channel 83 being 885.25 mhz.

    Wifi uses the 2.4 ghz band.

    Which is in the high side of the Microwave region (0.3 -3 ghz).
    richard, Feb 29, 2008
    #9
  10. philo

    Rôgêr Guest

    richard wrote:
    > On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 18:35:56 -0800, wrote:
    >
    >> richard <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Actually, that smoke detector in your home puts out more radiation
    >>> than your router does.

    >> A router, cell phone, any wireless device gives out microwaves, it
    >> cooks our food, but not our brains say Nokia and the rest.

    >
    > Duh. Microwave, for the uninformed, is a term used for extremely high
    > radio waves. Although these devices may work in that range, the power
    > output is nothing like that of a microwave oven or dish.
    > The guy who invented the MW oven itself, said, he had noticed his
    > candy bar had been "cooked" while he was working on the dish while it
    > was in use. Ergo, if his candy bar had been "cooked", then why wasn't
    > he?
    >
    > In order for a MW to have any effect upon the human body in any way,
    > the output of such a device would have to have a minimum rating of
    > 1000 watts. If such a router existed, it would be 10 times the size of
    > your desktop PC, and have a signal strength capable of 100 miles.
    >
    > Hmmmm. So like ok, I'll go build one of those puppies, advertise it,
    > and sign up everyone for a 100 miles around.
    >
    > So who needs cable?
    >
    > could a 200kw router extend over 1000 miles?


    Frequencies high enough to be labled "microwave" (500 MegaHertz to 30
    GigaHertz is one definition) are far too directional and far too easily
    absorbed by nearly any obstruction for that plan to work. The curvature
    of the Earth make long distances difficult unless you happen to own a
    couple of mountaintops with towers on them. But you still wouldn't need
    that much power if you did have the towers, distances of 100 miles has
    been achieved by standard power wireless equipment, just with special
    antennas and line of sight clearance.

    http://www.unwiredadventures.com/unwire/2005/12/defcon_wifi_sho.html
    Rôgêr, Feb 29, 2008
    #10
  11. philo

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 22:36:57 -0500, richard <>
    wrote:

    >No. TV signals are in the HF and the UHF range.
    >channel 5 is 77.25 mhz
    >With uhf channel 83 being 885.25 mhz.


    Somewhat correct.

    Fully explained at http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/catv-ch.html .
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
    Evan Platt, Feb 29, 2008
    #11
  12. philo

    Old Gringo Guest

    On Or About Thu, 28 Feb 2008 22:36:57 -0500, Without Any Hesitation
    Or Thinking Twice, richard Stumbled Over To The Keyboard And wrote
    The Following In The 24hoursupport.helpdesk News Group:

    > On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 20:47:34 -0600, Old Gringo
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Or About Thu, 28 Feb 2008 19:09:52 -0600, Without Any Hesitation
    >>Or Thinking Twice, philo Stumbled Over To The Keyboard And wrote The
    >>Following In The 24hoursupport.helpdesk News Group:
    >>
    >>> http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/archive/2007-05-27--the-truth-about-wireless-devices.html

    >>
    >>LOL Aren't the RF signals from the routers in the same space as all
    >>the other stuff? Some where between channel 5 and 6 on your TV?

    >
    > No. TV signals are in the HF and the UHF range.
    > channel 5 is 77.25 mhz
    > With uhf channel 83 being 885.25 mhz.
    >
    > Wifi uses the 2.4 ghz band.
    >
    > Which is in the high side of the Microwave region (0.3 -3 ghz).


    Thanks for the update, guess I was thinking of FM. I really haven't
    kept up with all the new technology since AM signals started racing
    across the sky. <g> Thanks again, I'll try to remember that.
    --
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    http://www.NuBoy-Industries.Com
    2/29/2008 7:24:50 AM CST
    Old Gringo, Feb 29, 2008
    #12
  13. philo

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 23:49:29 -0500, Rôgêr <> wrote:

    >richard wrote:
    >> On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 18:35:56 -0800, wrote:
    >>
    >>> richard <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Actually, that smoke detector in your home puts out more radiation
    >>>> than your router does.
    >>> A router, cell phone, any wireless device gives out microwaves, it
    >>> cooks our food, but not our brains say Nokia and the rest.

    >>
    >> Duh. Microwave, for the uninformed, is a term used for extremely high
    >> radio waves. Although these devices may work in that range, the power
    >> output is nothing like that of a microwave oven or dish.
    >> The guy who invented the MW oven itself, said, he had noticed his
    >> candy bar had been "cooked" while he was working on the dish while it
    >> was in use. Ergo, if his candy bar had been "cooked", then why wasn't
    >> he?
    >>
    >> In order for a MW to have any effect upon the human body in any way,
    >> the output of such a device would have to have a minimum rating of
    >> 1000 watts. If such a router existed, it would be 10 times the size of
    >> your desktop PC, and have a signal strength capable of 100 miles.
    >>
    >> Hmmmm. So like ok, I'll go build one of those puppies, advertise it,
    >> and sign up everyone for a 100 miles around.
    >>
    >> So who needs cable?
    >>
    >> could a 200kw router extend over 1000 miles?

    >
    >Frequencies high enough to be labled "microwave" (500 MegaHertz to 30
    >GigaHertz is one definition) are far too directional and far too easily
    >absorbed by nearly any obstruction for that plan to work. The curvature
    >of the Earth make long distances difficult unless you happen to own a
    >couple of mountaintops with towers on them. But you still wouldn't need
    >that much power if you did have the towers, distances of 100 miles has
    >been achieved by standard power wireless equipment, just with special
    >antennas and line of sight clearance.
    >
    >http://www.unwiredadventures.com/unwire/2005/12/defcon_wifi_sho.html


    I know. Seen the "wifi shoot out" page before.
    As a personal experience, I was able to hit a source 25 miles away
    with my little old flash drive antenna.
    Your basic every day router only has a range of less than 1,000 feet
    at the most. Given no basic obstructions in the way.

    The motel I'm in now has a nice setup. They have a router mounted on
    the outside wall right outside my room. So I always have a high
    signal.




    --

    A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.
    Mark Twain(attributed)
    richard, Feb 29, 2008
    #13
  14. philo

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 21:39:23 -0800, Evan Platt
    <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 22:36:57 -0500, richard <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>No. TV signals are in the HF and the UHF range.
    >>channel 5 is 77.25 mhz
    >>With uhf channel 83 being 885.25 mhz.

    >
    >Somewhat correct.
    >
    >Fully explained at http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/catv-ch.html .


    Precisely where I got the info from. Which I did to make sure I had it
    right rather than relying on memory.

    The main reason for the tv stations above ch 69 not being used any
    more is that those frequencies have been turned over to police and
    fire use et al, for use in what is known as "trunked" communication
    systems.
    Now before you go mouthin off about I don't know nuthin, have you ever
    held an FCC license? I have. I held what was then known as a "2nd
    class" license which allowed me to work on radio stations.

    And yes, I actually did. Kind of. My former high school needed a tech
    in order for their radio station to be on the air, so I volunteered my
    services.


    --

    A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.
    Mark Twain(attributed)
    richard, Feb 29, 2008
    #14
  15. philo

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 21:31:50 -0600, Mara
    <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 19:09:52 -0600, "philo" <> wrote:
    >
    >>http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/archive/2007-05-27--the-truth-about-wireless-devices.html

    >
    >http://zapatopi.net/afdb/



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    1-666-beanyhat





    --

    A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.
    Mark Twain(attributed)
    richard, Feb 29, 2008
    #15
  16. philo

    Ponder Guest

    Hiya Old Gringo.

    In <1kcxp57id650n$> you wrote:

    > Thanks for the update, guess I was thinking of FM. I really haven't
    > kept up with all the new technology since AM signals started racing
    > across the sky. <g> Thanks again, I'll try to remember that.


    AM and FM are nothing to do with the frequency (well, they each work
    better on different frequency ranges but that's besides the point). AM
    adjusts the amplitude of a carrier wave to transmit a signal and FM adjusts
    the frequency. This has the side effect of a much larger bandwidth for FM
    than AM.

    The signal acts differently depending on the wavelength (and thus
    frequency). Short wave signals will actually bounce off the ionosphere and
    the ground and make it across the globe. Medium wave has an approximate
    range of 50 miles in daytime, but at night, when the ionosphere is less
    agitated by the sun, it's about 200 miles as the signal bounces back to
    earth. VHF and above are line of sight.

    That's all from memory from a course I did almost 20 years ago, so forgive
    me if there are slight inaccuracies ;)

    --
    PGP key ID - DSS:0x2661A952
    Homepage: http://www.colinjones.co.uk ICQ# 1707811
    Skittles Team: http://www.ddskittles.co.uk
    Ponder, Feb 29, 2008
    #16
  17. philo

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 08:44:47 -0500, richard <>
    wrote:

    >The main reason for the tv stations above ch 69 not being used any
    >more is that those frequencies have been turned over to police and
    >fire use et al, for use in what is known as "trunked" communication
    >systems.


    There's plenty of conventional channels in the 800 band too, not just
    trunked.

    >Now before you go mouthin off about I don't know nuthin, have you ever
    >held an FCC license?


    Yes.

    Go to the FCC and look up my name, Not too difficult.
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
    Evan Platt, Feb 29, 2008
    #17
  18. philo

    richard Guest

    On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 13:56:21 GMT, Ponder <>
    wrote:

    >Hiya Old Gringo.
    >
    >In <1kcxp57id650n$> you wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for the update, guess I was thinking of FM. I really haven't
    >> kept up with all the new technology since AM signals started racing
    >> across the sky. <g> Thanks again, I'll try to remember that.

    >
    > AM and FM are nothing to do with the frequency (well, they each work
    >better on different frequency ranges but that's besides the point). AM
    >adjusts the amplitude of a carrier wave to transmit a signal and FM adjusts
    >the frequency. This has the side effect of a much larger bandwidth for FM
    >than AM.
    >
    > The signal acts differently depending on the wavelength (and thus
    >frequency). Short wave signals will actually bounce off the ionosphere and
    >the ground and make it across the globe. Medium wave has an approximate
    >range of 50 miles in daytime, but at night, when the ionosphere is less
    >agitated by the sun, it's about 200 miles as the signal bounces back to
    >earth. VHF and above are line of sight.
    >
    > That's all from memory from a course I did almost 20 years ago, so forgive
    >me if there are slight inaccuracies ;)


    Done just fine youngster. Tv signals are actually both AM and FM. Am
    for video and FM for audio. That is for about another year or so when
    they switch to digital.

    Actually, any radio signal can be "line of sight". That's a term often
    confused by the words used. Just think of "line of sight" as tunnel
    vision and you get the idea. As radio signals will go anywhere they
    damn well please unless "directed" by the antenna.

    Some years ago, when connected with a search and rescue group, I had
    our base radio set up in my parent's home. A mere 100 watt radio with
    a 110ft antenna. Which I built. There was one particular summer day
    when radio signals could be heard 2,000 miles away with ease.
    In Cincinnati, I was hearing ambulances in Los Angeles, Ca.
    So I keyed down the mic, announced the call sign and location.
    "Christ did you guys hear that station from Cincinnati? Sounded like
    he was right beside me."
    So I politely advised all stations on that frequency of the weather
    conditions and said that if someone was having problems talking to
    their dispatch, and they could hear the unit, to go ahead and relay.
    After that, practically every station in the country on that frequency
    switched to private line. Sub audible tone included with the
    transmission.

    Before that, there was another similar case. Involving Hamilton Co.
    Ohio's sheriff's office. Dispatch sent out a call to a unit about an
    accident at an intersection.
    "What are those street names again? I don't believe we have those
    streets in this county."
    "What county are you in sir?"
    "Los Angeles of course."
    "Uh well sir, you can disregard this dispatch. This is Hamilton County
    Ohio."

    That was just before the Tv show "1-adam-12" appeared.
    The reason for the unit designation was so that in case that ever
    happened again, there would be no confusion. LA county used numbers
    and letters from 1 to 5 for police and hamilton county used numbers 6
    through 9.

    Given the right circumstances, all kinds of strange things can happen
    with radio signals.

    I once talked to a gal in california on my 4 watt CB while I was in
    Ohio. For about a minute.





    --

    A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.
    Mark Twain(attributed)
    richard, Feb 29, 2008
    #18
  19. philo

    nobody > Guest

    richard wrote:

    > Now before you go mouthin off about I don't know nuthin, have you ever
    > held an FCC license? I have. I held what was then known as a "2nd
    > class" license which allowed me to work on radio stations.
    >
    > And yes, I actually did. Kind of. My former high school needed a tech
    > in order for their radio station to be on the air, so I volunteered my
    > services.


    And what license mill did you use? Which Q&A cheatbook did you memorize?

    I passed the General Radiotelephone from working knowledge and my USAF
    techschool books, not questions with answers. FWIW, I held 1 9-level and
    3 more 7-level commo electronics Air Force Specialty Codes. I didn't
    need a license in the military but decided it might just help with a
    civilian job. It would have been a "First" but I waited too long and Fox
    Charley changed the rules.

    Let me guess:
    You decided to use that 2nd class to repair ChickenBanders. You got to
    meet truckers and decided that 18wheelin' would get you more pussy than
    fixin' radios. The rest is history best left untold.
    nobody >, Mar 1, 2008
    #19
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