scanning slides with flatbed scanner - any other methods?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Steve, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    I have tried scanning old 35mm slides using these methods or various
    combinations -
    http://www.abstractconcreteworks.com/essays/scanning/scanning.html
    http://www.afn.org/~afn11300/slides.html

    but the results have been less than satisfactory (the images appear washed
    out with no color). It may be the flatbed scanner (HP PSC 1610) or the
    type of flourescent light used as a backlight. I have also tried the
    scanner software settings - color, light, "old photo", etc. but this doesn't
    help much. There are not enough slides to justify buying an adapter and I
    know I could get a service to do this with a real slide scanner but before
    that -- has anyone else used these methods or have another way to scan
    slides using a flatbed scanner?
    Any suggestions appreciated!
    Thanks
     
    Steve, Jan 13, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Steve

    Craig Guest

    "Steve" <> wrote...

    >I have tried scanning old 35mm slides using these methods or various
    > combinations -
    > http://www.abstractconcreteworks.com/essays/scanning/scanning.html
    > http://www.afn.org/~afn11300/slides.html
    >
    > but the results have been less than satisfactory (the images appear washed
    > out with no color). It may be the flatbed scanner (HP PSC 1610) or the
    > type of flourescent light used as a backlight. I have also tried the
    > scanner software settings - color, light, "old photo", etc. but this
    > doesn't
    > help much. There are not enough slides to justify buying an adapter and I
    > know I could get a service to do this with a real slide scanner but before
    > that -- has anyone else used these methods or have another way to scan
    > slides using a flatbed scanner?
    > Any suggestions appreciated!
    > Thanks


    Even with dedicated slide/negative scanners, slides are tougher to scan
    well than negatives due to slide's high contrast levels. Scanning slides
    with a flatbed scanner will do much worse. Since you say you have a
    small-ish number of slides, you'd be best off by finding a professional
    scanning service with a high-end slide scanner.

    Craig
     
    Craig, Jan 13, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Steve

    Pat Guest

    Re: scanning slides with flatbed scanner - any other methods?

    This is a bit "old school", but the method has been around forever.
    You'll need an adaptor to hook it up to your digital camera.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home;jsessionid=DH1GTGrcpR!258024540?O=productList&A=buyUsed&Q=81740
     
    Pat, Jan 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Steve

    Tom Guest

    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:43c792dd$0$5701$...
    >I have tried scanning old 35mm slides using these methods or various
    > combinations -
    > http://www.abstractconcreteworks.com/essays/scanning/scanning.html
    > http://www.afn.org/~afn11300/slides.html
    >
    > but the results have been less than satisfactory (the images appear washed
    > out with no color).

    I tried the methods above, and finally got frustrated enough to spend $80
    for an inexpensive scanner with builtin transparency capabilities. Much
    better.

    Tom G.
     
    Tom, Jan 13, 2006
    #4
  5. Steve

    Marvin Guest

    Re: scanning slides with flatbed scanner - any other methods?

    Pat wrote:
    > This is a bit "old school", but the method has been around forever.
    > You'll need an adaptor to hook it up to your digital camera.
    >
    > http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home;jsessionid=DH1GTGrcpR!258024540?O=productList&A=buyUsed&Q=81740
    >

    A limitation when copying with a digicam is that you don't get all the detail in the
    slide, unless you have a camera with at least 12 Mp. but is an inexpensive way to get the
    job done, and it will be faster than scanning.
     
    Marvin, Jan 13, 2006
    #5
  6. Steve

    Malcolm Guest

    > I have tried scanning old 35mm slides using these methods or various
    > combinations -


    You don't say what quality you are looking for.

    If top notch quality isn't a requirement, you can perhaps try this method:

    http://tinyurl.com/c2et8
    (It is a home made slide duplicator)

    Malcolm
     
    Malcolm, Jan 13, 2006
    #6
  7. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Malcolm" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > I have tried scanning old 35mm slides using these methods or various
    > > combinations -

    >
    > You don't say what quality you are looking for.
    >
    > If top notch quality isn't a requirement, you can perhaps try this method:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/c2et8
    > (It is a home made slide duplicator)
    >
    > Malcolm


    the quality of the pics looks pretty good (for my purposes). I may build
    one of those homemade slide duplicators
    thanks!
     
    Steve, Jan 14, 2006
    #7
  8. Steve

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Fri, 13 Jan 2006 22:31:55 +0200, "Malcolm" <>
    wrote:

    >> I have tried scanning old 35mm slides using these methods or various
    >> combinations -

    >
    >You don't say what quality you are looking for.
    >
    >If top notch quality isn't a requirement, you can perhaps try this method:
    >
    >http://tinyurl.com/c2et8
    >(It is a home made slide duplicator)
    >
    >Malcolm


    Serendipitous. This evening I read the above. This afternoon I had
    been trying a similar - but hardly as well-crafted - approach with:

    http://home.earthlink.net/~tony_cooper213/slide.jpg

    Haven't got it to work yet. Haven't been able to focus properly.

    That's a plumbing fitting that I had in the garage. It sorta fits
    over the extended lens if you don't jiggle.

    --


    Tony Cooper
    Orlando, FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 14, 2006
    #8
  9. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Tony Cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 13 Jan 2006 22:31:55 +0200, "Malcolm" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >> I have tried scanning old 35mm slides using these methods or various
    > >> combinations -

    > >
    > >You don't say what quality you are looking for.
    > >
    > >If top notch quality isn't a requirement, you can perhaps try this

    method:
    > >
    > >http://tinyurl.com/c2et8
    > >(It is a home made slide duplicator)
    > >
    > >Malcolm

    >
    > Serendipitous. This evening I read the above. This afternoon I had
    > been trying a similar - but hardly as well-crafted - approach with:
    >
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~tony_cooper213/slide.jpg
    >
    > Haven't got it to work yet. Haven't been able to focus properly.
    >
    > That's a plumbing fitting that I had in the garage. It sorta fits
    > over the extended lens if you don't jiggle.
    >
    > Tony Cooper
    > Orlando, FL


    For something like this to work your camera may need a "super macro"
    function such as - http://users.iafrica.com/m/mc/mcollett/brsd/
     
    Steve, Jan 14, 2006
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Stromer2

    HP 7400C Flatbed scanner-Any good for film

    Stromer2, Jul 13, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    528
    David R
    Jul 16, 2003
  2. Mark Levison

    Flatbed scanner recommendations for scanning film

    Mark Levison, Sep 11, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    460
    Azzz1588
    Sep 12, 2003
  3. nonamegiven
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    2,758
    Robert Feinman
    Dec 14, 2003
  4. Steve

    Re: scanning slides with flatbed scanner -

    Steve, Jan 13, 2006, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,470
    Steve
    Jan 14, 2006
  5. Replies:
    12
    Views:
    1,205
    J. Clarke
    Mar 28, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page