Scanning Resolution

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by thankyou, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. thankyou

    thankyou Guest

    If anyone has a suggestion on scanner resolutions I’d appreciate the
    help. I’m sort of up against time on this project, so, excuse me if
    this question has an easy answer that I have not thought through.

    I have a $50 HP Scanner, I want to scan photo prints (3x5, 4x6) to
    enlarge (possibly crop) up to maybe 24 x 18.

    The only thing I know about scanning is, if you set the dpi higher it
    takes more time to scan and the file size is larger (sort of joking
    here).

    What resolution do you suggest? Can I get some help with the math
    again?

    If I’m trying for a 24 x18 print at 300 dpi then the pixel size
    “should” be, 7200 x 5400.

    If the above is correct, how does the 7200 x 5400 translate to my
    scanning a 3x5 or 4x6?
     
    thankyou, Jun 20, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. thankyou

    thankyou Guest

    7200 x 5400 = 38 mb file? Wow!
     
    thankyou, Jun 20, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. thankyou

    Don Stauffer Guest

    thankyou wrote:

    >
    > If I’m trying for a 24 x18 print at 300 dpi then the pixel size
    > “should” be, 7200 x 5400.
    >
    > If the above is correct, how does the 7200 x 5400 translate to my
    > scanning a 3x5 or 4x6?


    Divide 7200 by 5, and 5400 by 3 for the 3x5 print. Do a similar
    exercise for the 4 x 6.
     
    Don Stauffer, Jun 20, 2009
    #3
  4. thankyou

    thankyou Guest

    Thanks. I see what you are saying.
    What are my options for scanning the negatives? What results can I
    expect?

    Thanks again, Jon
     
    thankyou, Jun 20, 2009
    #4
  5. thankyou

    Marvin Guest

    thankyou wrote:
    > If anyone has a suggestion on scanner resolutions I’d appreciate the
    > help. I’m sort of up against time on this project, so, excuse me if
    > this question has an easy answer that I have not thought through.
    >
    > I have a $50 HP Scanner, I want to scan photo prints (3x5, 4x6) to
    > enlarge (possibly crop) up to maybe 24 x 18.
    >
    > The only thing I know about scanning is, if you set the dpi higher it
    > takes more time to scan and the file size is larger (sort of joking
    > here).
    >
    > What resolution do you suggest? Can I get some help with the math
    > again?
    >
    > If I’m trying for a 24 x18 print at 300 dpi then the pixel size
    > “should” be, 7200 x 5400.
    >
    > If the above is correct, how does the 7200 x 5400 translate to my
    > scanning a 3x5 or 4x6?


    HP suggests scanning photos at 250 ppi. Depending on the
    quality of the print being scanned, I sometimes scan at 300
    ppi. A higher dpi setting doesn't collect more information
    from the print, and it can pick up small imperfections.
     
    Marvin, Jun 20, 2009
    #5
  6. thankyou

    John Navas Guest

    On Sat, 20 Jun 2009 14:38:22 GMT, Marvin <> wrote in
    <yv6%l.187$>:

    >thankyou wrote:
    >> If anyone has a suggestion on scanner resolutions I’d appreciate the
    >> help. I’m sort of up against time on this project, so, excuse me if
    >> this question has an easy answer that I have not thought through.
    >>
    >> I have a $50 HP Scanner, I want to scan photo prints (3x5, 4x6) to
    >> enlarge (possibly crop) up to maybe 24 x 18.
    >>
    >> The only thing I know about scanning is, if you set the dpi higher it
    >> takes more time to scan and the file size is larger (sort of joking
    >> here).
    >>
    >> What resolution do you suggest? Can I get some help with the math
    >> again?
    >>
    >> If I’m trying for a 24 x18 print at 300 dpi then the pixel size
    >> “should” be, 7200 x 5400.
    >>
    >> If the above is correct, how does the 7200 x 5400 translate to my
    >> scanning a 3x5 or 4x6?

    >
    >HP suggests scanning photos at 250 ppi. Depending on the
    >quality of the print being scanned, I sometimes scan at 300
    >ppi. A higher dpi setting doesn't collect more information
    >from the print, and it can pick up small imperfections.


    Correct.

    For larger prints, given the low resolution source, it's helpful to then
    upscale scans before printing in advanced software like Genuine Fractals
    to 200-300 PPI for the desired print size.

    Then I usually print a section of the resulting image file at the same
    resolution on 4x6 or 8x10 paper to be sure I'm satisfied with the result
    before spending money on a large print.

    --
    Best regards,
    John (Panasonic DMC-FZ28, and several others)
     
    John Navas, Jun 20, 2009
    #6
  7. thankyou

    thankyou Guest

    thankyou, Jun 20, 2009
    #7
  8. thankyou

    John Navas Guest

    On Sat, 20 Jun 2009 07:56:17 -0700 (PDT), thankyou <>
    wrote in
    <>:

    >Would this be a good option?
    >
    >Would a negative scaner from Costco work?
    >http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11472903&whse=BC&topnav=&browse=&lang=en-US&s=1


    It will work, and be much better than scanning prints, but you tend to
    get what you pay for, and results won't be as good as:
    <http://www.abesofmaine.com/item.do?item=NKLS5000&id=NKLS5000&l=PRICEGRABB>
    or a good used CoolScan IV, which go for about $400 or so on eBay.

    --
    Best regards,
    John (Panasonic DMC-FZ28, and several others)
     
    John Navas, Jun 20, 2009
    #8
  9. thankyou

    thankyou Guest

    Right!

    Why is the Nikon Coolscan 5000 rated "only" 4000 dpi true optical
    resolution and the Costco at 7200 dpi x 3600 dpi?

    Thanks again John.
     
    thankyou, Jun 20, 2009
    #9
  10. thankyou

    thankyou Guest

    thankyou, Jun 20, 2009
    #10
  11. thankyou wrote:
    > Right!
    >
    > Why is the Nikon Coolscan 5000 rated "only" 4000 dpi true optical
    > resolution and the Costco at 7200 dpi x 3600 dpi?
    >
    > Thanks again John.


    Because some low-end manufacturers are *very* optimistic with their specs.

    Claudio Bonavolta
    http://www.bonavolta.ch
     
    Claudio Bonavolta, Jun 20, 2009
    #11
  12. thankyou

    Marvin Guest

    Marvin, Jun 21, 2009
    #12
  13. thankyou

    Marvin Guest

    thankyou wrote:
    > Also, with the PrimeFilm PF7250u from Costco
    > http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11472903&whse=BC&top...
    >
    > Would I be able to get a file large enough to enlarge a print up to 24
    > x 18?
    >
    > Thanks again,
    > Jon

    You can print at any size you want, but the resolution will
    never be better than in the original. You seem to have a
    poster in mind. Posters aren't meant to be viewed close-up,
    so the resolution doesn't have to be great.
     
    Marvin, Jun 21, 2009
    #13
  14. thankyou

    John Navas Guest

    On Sat, 20 Jun 2009 08:32:15 -0700 (PDT), thankyou <>
    wrote in
    <>:

    >Why is the Nikon Coolscan 5000 rated "only" 4000 dpi true optical
    >resolution and the Costco at 7200 dpi x 3600 dpi?


    Because there's much more to scanned image quality than resolution
    claims by the hardware manufacturer, like optical quality and
    distortion, definition, and Dmax.
    <http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/scantek.htm>

    --
    Best regards,
    John (Panasonic DMC-FZ28, and several others)
     
    John Navas, Jun 21, 2009
    #14
  15. thankyou

    John Navas Guest

    On Sat, 20 Jun 2009 09:07:30 -0700 (PDT), thankyou <>
    wrote in
    <>:

    >Also, with the PrimeFilm PF7250u from Costco
    >http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11472903&whse=BC&top...
    >
    >Would I be able to get a file large enough to enlarge a print up to 24
    >x 18?


    Possibly, depending on how fussy you are. You'd have to try it to be
    sure, but of course you can always return it to Costco. As a check, pay
    to have the same slide or negative drum scanned.

    --
    Best regards,
    John (Panasonic DMC-FZ28, and several others)
     
    John Navas, Jun 21, 2009
    #15
  16. thankyou

    PDM Guest


    > Simple solution. Scan the images until you see film-grain in the images.
    > Scanning at any higher resolution than that is empty data. Since these are


    He's scanning photo's not neg's or transparancies. So how can he see film
    grain?

    PDM
     
    PDM, Jun 22, 2009
    #16
  17. thankyou

    PatM Guest

    On Jun 20, 9:33 am, thankyou <> wrote:
    > If anyone has a suggestion on scanner resolutions I’d appreciate the
    > help. I’m sort of up against time on this project, so, excuse me if
    > this question has an easy answer that I have not thought through.
    >
    > I have a $50 HP Scanner, I want to scan photo prints (3x5, 4x6) to
    > enlarge (possibly crop) up to maybe 24 x 18.
    >
    > The only thing I know about scanning is, if you set the dpi higher it
    > takes more time to scan and the file size is larger (sort of joking
    > here).
    >
    > What resolution do you suggest? Can I get some help with the math
    > again?
    >
    > If I’m trying for a 24 x18 print at 300 dpi then the pixel size
    > “should” be, 7200 x 5400.
    >
    > If the above is correct, how does the 7200 x 5400 translate to my
    > scanning a 3x5 or 4x6?


    If you are against a timeline, make tomorrow "Take-your-pictures-to-
    work Day" and use the photocopier. Mine scans at 50 pages per
    minute. You can do a lot, quickly, at that speed.
     
    PatM, Jun 22, 2009
    #17
  18. PDM wrote:
    >> Simple solution. Scan the images until you see film-grain in the images.
    >> Scanning at any higher resolution than that is empty data. Since these are

    >
    > He's scanning photo's not neg's or transparancies. So how can he see film
    > grain?


    Maybe he can see it in the print, maybe not. But it's there, even if it
    doesn't start showing to the naked eye until it's enlarged.

    --
    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 22, 2009
    #18
  19. What belongs to the photo? What belongs to the neg?

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..


    "PDM" <pdcm99[deletethisbit]@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:4a3fd24a$...

    He's scanning photo's not neg's or transparancies. So how
    can he see film
    grain?

    PDM
     
    Stormin Mormon, Jun 23, 2009
    #19
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. ~*Eternity*~

    Best scanning resolution

    ~*Eternity*~, Jan 31, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    898
    ~*Eternity*~
    Feb 4, 2004
  2. Jako

    Scanning Resolution

    Jako, Jul 16, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    446
    Robert E. Williams
    Jul 16, 2003
  3. hassy_user
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    825
    Bart van der Wolf
    Oct 27, 2004
  4. Anthony Buckland

    Resolution for scanning slides?

    Anthony Buckland, Feb 23, 2005, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    927
    Anthony Buckland
    Feb 26, 2005
  5. Louise
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    448
    Robert Feinman
    Jun 24, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page