Scanning a Mapped Drive on a LAN

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by John Gregory, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. John Gregory

    John Gregory Guest

    Situation: Three machines running different platforms; WIN95, WIN98SE, XP
    (new). The I mapped the main 98SE drive onto the XP machine. The 98SE has
    scheduled scans from Norton's System Works and Personal Firewall. The new
    machine runs McAfee VirusScan, Personal Firewall Plus, and Privacy Service.
    I'm investigating "SpyBot" and "Ad-Ware" but know little of them at this
    point. I threw the XP into a scan the other day and wondered why it was
    taking so long. I found it scanning the drive I mapped from the 98SE. That
    made me wonder what might happen if Norton and McAfee stated any kind of
    scan at all at the same time the other was attempting to use the drive. Do I
    have a potential conflict here or is the software sophisticated enough that
    it will catch itself and avoid damage to ... well... anything? If not, any
    recommendations? I didn't find provision to leave out the main drive from a
    scan with either of the two programs.
    John Gregory, Feb 22, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In article <mu7_b.15366$>, jaygreg90
    @hotmail.com says...
    > Situation: Three machines running different platforms; WIN95, WIN98SE, XP
    > (new). The I mapped the main 98SE drive onto the XP machine. The 98SE has
    > scheduled scans from Norton's System Works and Personal Firewall. The new
    > machine runs McAfee VirusScan, Personal Firewall Plus, and Privacy Service.
    > I'm investigating "SpyBot" and "Ad-Ware" but know little of them at this
    > point. I threw the XP into a scan the other day and wondered why it was
    > taking so long. I found it scanning the drive I mapped from the 98SE. That
    > made me wonder what might happen if Norton and McAfee stated any kind of
    > scan at all at the same time the other was attempting to use the drive. Do I
    > have a potential conflict here or is the software sophisticated enough that
    > it will catch itself and avoid damage to ... well... anything? If not, any
    > recommendations? I didn't find provision to leave out the main drive from a
    > scan with either of the two programs.
    >
    >
    >



    a large portion of _all_ end-user type programs have the potential to
    "do harm" if there's a conflict with another running application. for
    instance: loops when running two anti-viruses at the same time. it's
    always a good idea to "shut down", or at the very least, "make sure" two
    apps aren't attempting to "scan" the same file system, at the same time.
    this can lead to completely shutting down program "A" to allow program
    "B" to do it's thing. anyone that tells you "it's fine" to do both at
    once is potentially about to get you into trouble with your file system.



    --
    Colonel Flagg
    http://www.internetwarzone.org/

    Privacy at a click:
    http://www.cotse.net

    Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."

    "...I see stupid people."
    Colonel Flagg, Feb 22, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. John Gregory

    John Gregory Guest

    Thanks Colonel. Would you have any suggestion of how to handle this? The
    only thing I can think of is make one of those machines a completely manual
    scan and place reminders on my Outlook calendar.

    "Colonel Flagg" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > In article <mu7_b.15366$>, jaygreg90
    > @hotmail.com says...
    > > Situation: Three machines running different platforms; WIN95, WIN98SE,

    XP
    > > (new). The I mapped the main 98SE drive onto the XP machine. The 98SE

    has
    > > scheduled scans from Norton's System Works and Personal Firewall. The

    new
    > > machine runs McAfee VirusScan, Personal Firewall Plus, and Privacy

    Service.
    > > I'm investigating "SpyBot" and "Ad-Ware" but know little of them at this
    > > point. I threw the XP into a scan the other day and wondered why it was
    > > taking so long. I found it scanning the drive I mapped from the 98SE.

    That
    > > made me wonder what might happen if Norton and McAfee stated any kind of
    > > scan at all at the same time the other was attempting to use the drive.

    Do I
    > > have a potential conflict here or is the software sophisticated enough

    that
    > > it will catch itself and avoid damage to ... well... anything? If not,

    any
    > > recommendations? I didn't find provision to leave out the main drive

    from a
    > > scan with either of the two programs.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > a large portion of _all_ end-user type programs have the potential to
    > "do harm" if there's a conflict with another running application. for
    > instance: loops when running two anti-viruses at the same time. it's
    > always a good idea to "shut down", or at the very least, "make sure" two
    > apps aren't attempting to "scan" the same file system, at the same time.
    > this can lead to completely shutting down program "A" to allow program
    > "B" to do it's thing. anyone that tells you "it's fine" to do both at
    > once is potentially about to get you into trouble with your file system.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Colonel Flagg
    > http://www.internetwarzone.org/
    >
    > Privacy at a click:
    > http://www.cotse.net
    >
    > Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    > A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."
    >
    > "...I see stupid people."
    John Gregory, Feb 22, 2004
    #3
  4. In article <aH8_b.15445$>, jaygreg90
    @hotmail.com says...
    > Thanks Colonel. Would you have any suggestion of how to handle this? The
    > only thing I can think of is make one of those machines a completely manual
    > scan and place reminders on my Outlook calendar.



    I'd say do it by hand.... I have a "calendar" in my head to which I
    refer to and remember to do my "manual scans" when it's time... even
    though I automate many things on unix servers, I don't do the same on
    Windows desktops.... there's so many things that go wrong, I just don't
    trust Windows automation.





    --
    Colonel Flagg
    http://www.internetwarzone.org/

    Privacy at a click:
    http://www.cotse.net

    Q: How many Bill Gates does it take to change a lightbulb?
    A: None, he just defines Darkness? as the new industry standard..."

    "...I see stupid people."
    Colonel Flagg, Feb 22, 2004
    #4
  5. John Gregory

    johns Guest

    "> Situation: Three machines running different platforms; WIN95, WIN98SE, XP

    If you are running '95 or '98SE, then you are wide open
    to hacking of all sorts, and there is not one program out
    there that can stop it. If you haven't seen scanning of lan
    drives before now, I can only assume you are new to
    this. The very first thing you need to do is get rid of those
    two machines. Nothing else needs to be said.

    johns
    johns, Feb 23, 2004
    #5
  6. John Gregory

    Leythos Guest

    In article <c1dbtn$q5i$>,
    says...
    >
    > "> Situation: Three machines running different platforms; WIN95, WIN98SE, XP
    >
    > If you are running '95 or '98SE, then you are wide open
    > to hacking of all sorts, and there is not one program out
    > there that can stop it. If you haven't seen scanning of lan
    > drives before now, I can only assume you are new to
    > this. The very first thing you need to do is get rid of those
    > two machines. Nothing else needs to be said.


    Um, since you don't know what is LAN to internet connection is setup as,
    your statement could be untrue.

    It's very easy to secure a W98 W98SE machine for use on the Internet.
    Even easier running a personal firewall. Even easier for W95, W98, W98SE
    if the person has a NAT router in front of them.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    Leythos, Feb 23, 2004
    #6
  7. John Gregory

    John Gregory Guest

    My machines connect to the net via cable modem/router/switch/PCs. It's the
    potential scanning conflicts of a mapped drive on the LAN that concerns me.
    In addition, I'd like some opinions on Spybot and Ad-Ware running with
    Norton SystemWorks and Personal Firewall; it has an ad block so I don't know
    if that puts it into conflict with Ad-Ware or not.


    "Leythos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <c1dbtn$q5i$>,
    > says...
    > >
    > > "> Situation: Three machines running different platforms; WIN95,

    WIN98SE, XP
    > >
    > > If you are running '95 or '98SE, then you are wide open
    > > to hacking of all sorts, and there is not one program out
    > > there that can stop it. If you haven't seen scanning of lan
    > > drives before now, I can only assume you are new to
    > > this. The very first thing you need to do is get rid of those
    > > two machines. Nothing else needs to be said.

    >
    > Um, since you don't know what is LAN to internet connection is setup as,
    > your statement could be untrue.
    >
    > It's very easy to secure a W98 W98SE machine for use on the Internet.
    > Even easier running a personal firewall. Even easier for W95, W98, W98SE
    > if the person has a NAT router in front of them.
    >
    > --
    > --
    >
    > (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    John Gregory, Feb 24, 2004
    #7
  8. John Gregory

    johns Guest


    > Um, since you don't know what is LAN to internet connection is setup as,
    > your statement could be untrue.


    Bullshit. I do this for a living.

    johns
    johns, Feb 25, 2004
    #8
  9. John Gregory

    johns Guest


    > My machines connect to the net via cable modem/router/switch/PCs. It's the
    > potential scanning conflicts of a mapped drive on the LAN that concerns

    me.

    Why? You are wide open to even kid stuff running W95, 98SE.
    You don't know what you are doing. You need to can those OSes
    as soon as possible. .

    > In addition, I'd like some opinions on Spybot and Ad-Ware running


    Neither one of those programs is effective as they claim. Both of
    those programs only find pieces of the dropper, and you will
    reinfect over and over. You are wasting your time on trivia.
    You cannot do what you need to do for security in any degree
    whatsoever running W95, 98SE. That is total nonsense.

    johns
    johns, Feb 25, 2004
    #9
  10. John Gregory

    John Gregory Guest

    >>Why? You are wide open to even kid stuff running W95, 98SE.
    You don't know what you are doing. You need to can those OSes
    as soon as possible. <<

    Well, genious, let's hear your explanation instead of boasting you know it
    all. I don't giove a damn WHAT you do for a living. I asked the question
    because I DON'T know. Didn't need you to tell me that. If you can't offer a
    civil explanation and advice, go play elsewhere! You've brought nothing
    constructive to the thread so far.

    "johns" <> wrote in message
    news:c1hfsl$2pnb$...
    >
    > > My machines connect to the net via cable modem/router/switch/PCs. It's

    the
    > > potential scanning conflicts of a mapped drive on the LAN that concerns

    > me.
    >
    > Why? You are wide open to even kid stuff running W95, 98SE.
    > You don't know what you are doing. You need to can those OSes
    > as soon as possible. .
    >
    > > In addition, I'd like some opinions on Spybot and Ad-Ware running

    >
    > Neither one of those programs is effective as they claim. Both of
    > those programs only find pieces of the dropper, and you will
    > reinfect over and over. You are wasting your time on trivia.
    > You cannot do what you need to do for security in any degree
    > whatsoever running W95, 98SE. That is total nonsense.
    >
    > johns
    >
    >
    John Gregory, Feb 25, 2004
    #10
  11. John Gregory

    Leythos Guest

    In article <c1hfjt$2pfs$>, x says...
    >
    > > Um, since you don't know what is LAN to internet connection is setup as,
    > > your statement could be untrue.

    >
    > Bullshit. I do this for a living.


    So do I and I've been doing it for more than 20 years, and from your
    post I am sure that you have a real hard time diagnosing problems. You
    were wrong.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    Leythos, Feb 25, 2004
    #11
  12. John Gregory

    Leythos Guest

    In article <c1hfsl$2pnb$>, x says...
    > > In addition, I'd like some opinions on Spybot and Ad-Ware running

    >
    > Neither one of those programs is effective as they claim. Both of
    > those programs only find pieces of the dropper, and you will
    > reinfect over and over. You are wasting your time on trivia.


    When the heck are you going to learn?

    SpyBot S & D from www.safer-networking.net is a very good program that
    often needs to be run 3 or 4 times to clean a machine. As I recall,
    having actually visited the site many time, it does NOT claim to remove
    all traces from a users machine. SBS&D is a free application and does
    well. If you find something that it doesn't take care of you should
    contact the chaps that make it and the updates and let them know - it's
    a free project (much like open source project teams).

    When running SBS&D (as with others) you need to run it once, then again
    in Safe Mode (if your OS has one), and then again, then after using the
    system for a few hours, run it again to see if there were any timed
    droppers in there that it can detect that it could not remove.

    > You cannot do what you need to do for security in any degree
    > whatsoever running W95, 98SE. That is total nonsense.


    This is utter BS. You should really quit your IT job and get a factory
    job. For someone that does this stuff for a living (as you said earlier)
    you keep showing that you really don't know much about networking or
    security.


    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    Leythos, Feb 25, 2004
    #12
  13. John Gregory

    John Gregory Guest

    Leythos, you seem to be a bit more analytical than "Shoot from the hip"
    johns. What's you're take on my situation please. I have the original issue
    resolved; the Colonel made sense and I've decided to simply schedule my
    scans of one machine with reminders on my Outlook calendar. But that leaves
    me with the issue of these other programs I think I need - or something
    better if I find it; SpyBot and Ad-Ware. Got a comment or recommendation?

    Regarding the misread by "johns", I was told long ago I had little to be
    concern with as a simple home LAN user with my machines behind a router. Two
    of the machines run firewalls, the WIN95 doesn't. In your opinion, an I
    reasonibly well protected? IF not, I'd appreaciate hearing something
    constructive in a straightforeward manner. Use polysyllabic words to
    disguise the conversation from "johns" if you wish.


    "Leythos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <c1hfjt$2pfs$>, x says...
    > >
    > > > Um, since you don't know what is LAN to internet connection is setup

    as,
    > > > your statement could be untrue.

    > >
    > > Bullshit. I do this for a living.

    >
    > So do I and I've been doing it for more than 20 years, and from your
    > post I am sure that you have a real hard time diagnosing problems. You
    > were wrong.
    >
    > --
    > --
    >
    > (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    John Gregory, Feb 25, 2004
    #13
  14. John Gregory

    Leythos Guest

    In article <QP2%b.1501$>, jaygreg90
    @hotmail.com says...
    > Leythos, you seem to be a bit more analytical than "Shoot from the hip"
    > johns. What's you're take on my situation please. I have the original issue
    > resolved; the Colonel made sense and I've decided to simply schedule my
    > scans of one machine with reminders on my Outlook calendar. But that leaves
    > me with the issue of these other programs I think I need - or something
    > better if I find it; SpyBot and Ad-Ware. Got a comment or recommendation?


    I'm not sure I understand the "reminders on my OL calendar" bit? If you
    do a live-update every day, and run a full scan every evening, and leave
    the AV product active all the time, you can't really ask for more.

    As for SB and AW, I've only used SBS&D from www.safer-networking.net,
    there is a clone-type Spybot that's a rip-off of SBS&D, so make sure you
    have the real one.

    I've found that SBS&D finds about 95% of the things out there that don't
    like you, but, since it's a free application I can't complain about it.

    What I do is run it about 4 times, making sure I've downloaded the
    updates before I run it. I boot to safe mode on the last scan and check
    again - this is on customers systems, not one my own systems.

    I also edit the registry to remove items from the RUN, RUNONCE sections
    that are not needed and I also search for items in the registry that may
    be hidden.

    I run NAV Small Business Edition 8.1 on my computers - smaller foot
    print, faster, never failed me yet.

    > Regarding the misread by "johns", I was told long ago I had little to be
    > concern with as a simple home LAN user with my machines behind a router. Two
    > of the machines run firewalls, the WIN95 doesn't. In your opinion, an I
    > reasonibly well protected? IF not, I'd appreaciate hearing something
    > constructive in a straightforeward manner. Use polysyllabic words to
    > disguise the conversation from "johns" if you wish.


    In the old days I had a simple Linksys Router BEFSR41 and a good NAV
    product (not NIS or NPF) running on my computers, never had a problem.
    When I started a server farm I bought a WatchGuard Firebox II unit and
    I've removed the BEFSR41. I also run Wall Watcher on one of the systems
    that sits behind the Linksys units - this lets me see all in/outbound so
    that I can tell if a machine has been compromised based on traffic.

    Since I have a block of IP's I setup a couple development areas where I
    attach a BEFSX41 router to an IP and then have several servers and
    workstations behind that. This lets me build applications without the
    risk of compromising my LAN (the FB II network) should something go
    wrong. Again, each system in running a licensed copy of SBE 8.1 full
    time.

    It doesn't make any difference what OS you run, Linux, Windows, MAC,
    etc... there are things out there that, once they reach you, will
    compromise your machine. A border device like a router with NAT is a
    first step in blocking intruders from even gaining access to your
    computers. A second step is a quality AV product. A final step is to
    understand the issues with your use of the internet, browsing, usenet,
    email, etc...

    As an example, I use IE 6 because I write .Net code and need IE 6 for
    some of the features, but I secure IE 6 in a manner that I feel safe in
    using it on the generic web - I do not visit warez sites or porn sites
    or other places that are high-risk areas. For usenet I use Gravity and
    feel very secure using it. For email I use MS Outlook, BUT, I have my
    own email servers and all in/out bound email is scanned, stripped of
    unapproved attachments, virus's removed, and any files that are unknown
    in the attachments are removed. I also don't open email from people I
    don't know.

    Here is something I sent to customers and friends about IE the other
    day:

    The easiest way to clean a machine is to download SpyBot Search and
    Destroy from http://www.safer-networking.org/index.php?page=download and
    the update and run it several times (download button is about half-way
    down the page).

    Once you get your machine cleaned, you can make the following changes to
    your Internet Explorer settings to help keep web sites from installing
    bad things on your computers.

    There are a couple simple things that you can do if you are using IE,
    they make browsing a little more of a challenge, but they make it more
    secure and still provide full ability on sites you trust:

    1) Open IE, select TOOLS, Internet Options
    2) Select Security TAB
    3) Select "Internet" globe
    4) Click DEFAULT LEVEL, then SELECT HIGH
    5) Select "Custom Level"
    6) Select "Scripting - Active Scripting - Prompt"
    7) Click OK
    8) Select "Trusted Sites Check Mark Circle"
    9) Select "SITES", uncheck "Require Server Verification" - you will be
    adding the normal and secure sites in here that you trust, if you don't
    uncheck this you can't enter non-secure sites in this list.
    10) Type "http://v4.windowsupdate.microsoft.com" in the ADD box and
    click ADD
    11) Type "http://Windowsupdate.microsoft.com" in the ADD box and click
    ADD, click OK to close window
    12) Click "Default Level" then change to "Medium".
    13) Select "Privacy" tab, set to MEDIUM HIGH
    14) Select "General" tab, select "Temporary Internet Files - Settings"
    15) Select "Every visit to the page"
    16) Select 20MB for the temp internet files size, click OK
    17) Select "Advanced" Tab
    18) Uncheck both "Enable Install On Demand" items
    19) Uncheck "Enable third-party browser extensions"
    20) Uncheck "Play Animations, sounds, videos in web pages"
    21) Select/Check "Empty Temporary Internet file folder..."
    22) Click OK to close the settings window

    Now, when you browse to a site you want to trust, it's not going to
    work, you are going to have to ADD the site to the TRUSTED SITES in the
    OPTIONS / SECURITY tab. This can be a real pain, but it can save your
    butt when it comes to sites that can compromise your system.

    You will find that after the first week that you are not adding sites to
    the list any more and that you're experience is a lot nicer, less pop-
    ups, and less chance for something to hack your browser.

    Don't forget, you should only ADD TRUSTED SITES to the list. Even if you
    make a mistake, we set the TRUSTED SITES to MEDIUM in stead of it's
    default LOW, but you really want to limit the ones you add to verifiable
    commercial quality sites.

    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    Leythos, Feb 25, 2004
    #14
  15. John Gregory

    John Gregory Guest

    Thank you very much for the help, Leythos. I installed and ran SpyBot. It
    found a page and a half of "stuff", all but two being usage trackers so I
    guess for about 5 years of use, I've done fairly well. Now I'll investigate
    Ad-Ware for the same machine. When I feel comfortable with both, I'll move
    put a copy on my new XP. If you have any comments on Ad-Ware that might be
    helpful, I'd appreaciate hearing them. Your suggestions were very good and
    I'll study you recommendation to the IE adjustments.

    By the way, my reference to placing reminders on my Outlook calendar was to
    serve as a reminder to manually run the scanning software of McAfee on the
    new machine and leave the old one automated. The new one has the C drive of
    the old one mapped. When I scan the new... it scans the old. Since I'm not
    knowledible about the inworking of the Norton SystemWorks scans on that old
    machine, I don't trust my ability to avoid conflic on the mapped drive. If
    my calendar reminds me to scan and nothing is kicked into gear without my
    hand, I can shut the other machine off completely and scan the new one. I'f
    there were a way to automate bot and be certain the two would never attempt
    to access the mapped drive at the same time, I'd do it.

    Again, thank you for your help.

    "Leythos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <QP2%b.1501$>, jaygreg90
    > @hotmail.com says...
    > > Leythos, you seem to be a bit more analytical than "Shoot from the hip"
    > > johns. What's you're take on my situation please. I have the original

    issue
    > > resolved; the Colonel made sense and I've decided to simply schedule my
    > > scans of one machine with reminders on my Outlook calendar. But that

    leaves
    > > me with the issue of these other programs I think I need - or something
    > > better if I find it; SpyBot and Ad-Ware. Got a comment or

    recommendation?
    >
    > I'm not sure I understand the "reminders on my OL calendar" bit? If you
    > do a live-update every day, and run a full scan every evening, and leave
    > the AV product active all the time, you can't really ask for more.
    >
    > As for SB and AW, I've only used SBS&D from www.safer-networking.net,
    > there is a clone-type Spybot that's a rip-off of SBS&D, so make sure you
    > have the real one.
    >
    > I've found that SBS&D finds about 95% of the things out there that don't
    > like you, but, since it's a free application I can't complain about it.
    >
    > What I do is run it about 4 times, making sure I've downloaded the
    > updates before I run it. I boot to safe mode on the last scan and check
    > again - this is on customers systems, not one my own systems.
    >
    > I also edit the registry to remove items from the RUN, RUNONCE sections
    > that are not needed and I also search for items in the registry that may
    > be hidden.
    >
    > I run NAV Small Business Edition 8.1 on my computers - smaller foot
    > print, faster, never failed me yet.
    >
    > > Regarding the misread by "johns", I was told long ago I had little to be
    > > concern with as a simple home LAN user with my machines behind a router.

    Two
    > > of the machines run firewalls, the WIN95 doesn't. In your opinion, an I
    > > reasonibly well protected? IF not, I'd appreaciate hearing something
    > > constructive in a straightforeward manner. Use polysyllabic words to
    > > disguise the conversation from "johns" if you wish.

    >
    > In the old days I had a simple Linksys Router BEFSR41 and a good NAV
    > product (not NIS or NPF) running on my computers, never had a problem.
    > When I started a server farm I bought a WatchGuard Firebox II unit and
    > I've removed the BEFSR41. I also run Wall Watcher on one of the systems
    > that sits behind the Linksys units - this lets me see all in/outbound so
    > that I can tell if a machine has been compromised based on traffic.
    >
    > Since I have a block of IP's I setup a couple development areas where I
    > attach a BEFSX41 router to an IP and then have several servers and
    > workstations behind that. This lets me build applications without the
    > risk of compromising my LAN (the FB II network) should something go
    > wrong. Again, each system in running a licensed copy of SBE 8.1 full
    > time.
    >
    > It doesn't make any difference what OS you run, Linux, Windows, MAC,
    > etc... there are things out there that, once they reach you, will
    > compromise your machine. A border device like a router with NAT is a
    > first step in blocking intruders from even gaining access to your
    > computers. A second step is a quality AV product. A final step is to
    > understand the issues with your use of the internet, browsing, usenet,
    > email, etc...
    >
    > As an example, I use IE 6 because I write .Net code and need IE 6 for
    > some of the features, but I secure IE 6 in a manner that I feel safe in
    > using it on the generic web - I do not visit warez sites or porn sites
    > or other places that are high-risk areas. For usenet I use Gravity and
    > feel very secure using it. For email I use MS Outlook, BUT, I have my
    > own email servers and all in/out bound email is scanned, stripped of
    > unapproved attachments, virus's removed, and any files that are unknown
    > in the attachments are removed. I also don't open email from people I
    > don't know.
    >
    > Here is something I sent to customers and friends about IE the other
    > day:
    >
    > The easiest way to clean a machine is to download SpyBot Search and
    > Destroy from http://www.safer-networking.org/index.php?page=download and
    > the update and run it several times (download button is about half-way
    > down the page).
    >
    > Once you get your machine cleaned, you can make the following changes to
    > your Internet Explorer settings to help keep web sites from installing
    > bad things on your computers.
    >
    > There are a couple simple things that you can do if you are using IE,
    > they make browsing a little more of a challenge, but they make it more
    > secure and still provide full ability on sites you trust:
    >
    > 1) Open IE, select TOOLS, Internet Options
    > 2) Select Security TAB
    > 3) Select "Internet" globe
    > 4) Click DEFAULT LEVEL, then SELECT HIGH
    > 5) Select "Custom Level"
    > 6) Select "Scripting - Active Scripting - Prompt"
    > 7) Click OK
    > 8) Select "Trusted Sites Check Mark Circle"
    > 9) Select "SITES", uncheck "Require Server Verification" - you will be
    > adding the normal and secure sites in here that you trust, if you don't
    > uncheck this you can't enter non-secure sites in this list.
    > 10) Type "http://v4.windowsupdate.microsoft.com" in the ADD box and
    > click ADD
    > 11) Type "http://Windowsupdate.microsoft.com" in the ADD box and click
    > ADD, click OK to close window
    > 12) Click "Default Level" then change to "Medium".
    > 13) Select "Privacy" tab, set to MEDIUM HIGH
    > 14) Select "General" tab, select "Temporary Internet Files - Settings"
    > 15) Select "Every visit to the page"
    > 16) Select 20MB for the temp internet files size, click OK
    > 17) Select "Advanced" Tab
    > 18) Uncheck both "Enable Install On Demand" items
    > 19) Uncheck "Enable third-party browser extensions"
    > 20) Uncheck "Play Animations, sounds, videos in web pages"
    > 21) Select/Check "Empty Temporary Internet file folder..."
    > 22) Click OK to close the settings window
    >
    > Now, when you browse to a site you want to trust, it's not going to
    > work, you are going to have to ADD the site to the TRUSTED SITES in the
    > OPTIONS / SECURITY tab. This can be a real pain, but it can save your
    > butt when it comes to sites that can compromise your system.
    >
    > You will find that after the first week that you are not adding sites to
    > the list any more and that you're experience is a lot nicer, less pop-
    > ups, and less chance for something to hack your browser.
    >
    > Don't forget, you should only ADD TRUSTED SITES to the list. Even if you
    > make a mistake, we set the TRUSTED SITES to MEDIUM in stead of it's
    > default LOW, but you really want to limit the ones you add to verifiable
    > commercial quality sites.
    >
    > --
    > --
    >
    > (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    John Gregory, Feb 25, 2004
    #15
  16. John Gregory

    John Gregory Guest

    Leythos,

    One small problem... apparently after I installed SpyBot I never tried
    accessing the net. When I fired up that machine this morning, it wouldn't
    access through my browser IE nor Outlook. I then reconfigured my firewall (I
    didn't. The program did.) and everything seems to be working fine.

    Instruction for installing SpyBot did say to make sure nothing was runnig.
    But I've always let my anti virus and firewall run during installations and
    have never noticed a problem.

    Should these two be shut down as well when I install on my XP machine?
    Perhaps what I observed was merely an unrelated glich that somehow
    straightened itself out.

    "Leythos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <QP2%b.1501$>, jaygreg90
    > @hotmail.com says...
    > > Leythos, you seem to be a bit more analytical than "Shoot from the hip"
    > > johns. What's you're take on my situation please. I have the original

    issue
    > > resolved; the Colonel made sense and I've decided to simply schedule my
    > > scans of one machine with reminders on my Outlook calendar. But that

    leaves
    > > me with the issue of these other programs I think I need - or something
    > > better if I find it; SpyBot and Ad-Ware. Got a comment or

    recommendation?
    >
    > I'm not sure I understand the "reminders on my OL calendar" bit? If you
    > do a live-update every day, and run a full scan every evening, and leave
    > the AV product active all the time, you can't really ask for more.
    >
    > As for SB and AW, I've only used SBS&D from www.safer-networking.net,
    > there is a clone-type Spybot that's a rip-off of SBS&D, so make sure you
    > have the real one.
    >
    > I've found that SBS&D finds about 95% of the things out there that don't
    > like you, but, since it's a free application I can't complain about it.
    >
    > What I do is run it about 4 times, making sure I've downloaded the
    > updates before I run it. I boot to safe mode on the last scan and check
    > again - this is on customers systems, not one my own systems.
    >
    > I also edit the registry to remove items from the RUN, RUNONCE sections
    > that are not needed and I also search for items in the registry that may
    > be hidden.
    >
    > I run NAV Small Business Edition 8.1 on my computers - smaller foot
    > print, faster, never failed me yet.
    >
    > > Regarding the misread by "johns", I was told long ago I had little to be
    > > concern with as a simple home LAN user with my machines behind a router.

    Two
    > > of the machines run firewalls, the WIN95 doesn't. In your opinion, an I
    > > reasonibly well protected? IF not, I'd appreaciate hearing something
    > > constructive in a straightforeward manner. Use polysyllabic words to
    > > disguise the conversation from "johns" if you wish.

    >
    > In the old days I had a simple Linksys Router BEFSR41 and a good NAV
    > product (not NIS or NPF) running on my computers, never had a problem.
    > When I started a server farm I bought a WatchGuard Firebox II unit and
    > I've removed the BEFSR41. I also run Wall Watcher on one of the systems
    > that sits behind the Linksys units - this lets me see all in/outbound so
    > that I can tell if a machine has been compromised based on traffic.
    >
    > Since I have a block of IP's I setup a couple development areas where I
    > attach a BEFSX41 router to an IP and then have several servers and
    > workstations behind that. This lets me build applications without the
    > risk of compromising my LAN (the FB II network) should something go
    > wrong. Again, each system in running a licensed copy of SBE 8.1 full
    > time.
    >
    > It doesn't make any difference what OS you run, Linux, Windows, MAC,
    > etc... there are things out there that, once they reach you, will
    > compromise your machine. A border device like a router with NAT is a
    > first step in blocking intruders from even gaining access to your
    > computers. A second step is a quality AV product. A final step is to
    > understand the issues with your use of the internet, browsing, usenet,
    > email, etc...
    >
    > As an example, I use IE 6 because I write .Net code and need IE 6 for
    > some of the features, but I secure IE 6 in a manner that I feel safe in
    > using it on the generic web - I do not visit warez sites or porn sites
    > or other places that are high-risk areas. For usenet I use Gravity and
    > feel very secure using it. For email I use MS Outlook, BUT, I have my
    > own email servers and all in/out bound email is scanned, stripped of
    > unapproved attachments, virus's removed, and any files that are unknown
    > in the attachments are removed. I also don't open email from people I
    > don't know.
    >
    > Here is something I sent to customers and friends about IE the other
    > day:
    >
    > The easiest way to clean a machine is to download SpyBot Search and
    > Destroy from http://www.safer-networking.org/index.php?page=download and
    > the update and run it several times (download button is about half-way
    > down the page).
    >
    > Once you get your machine cleaned, you can make the following changes to
    > your Internet Explorer settings to help keep web sites from installing
    > bad things on your computers.
    >
    > There are a couple simple things that you can do if you are using IE,
    > they make browsing a little more of a challenge, but they make it more
    > secure and still provide full ability on sites you trust:
    >
    > 1) Open IE, select TOOLS, Internet Options
    > 2) Select Security TAB
    > 3) Select "Internet" globe
    > 4) Click DEFAULT LEVEL, then SELECT HIGH
    > 5) Select "Custom Level"
    > 6) Select "Scripting - Active Scripting - Prompt"
    > 7) Click OK
    > 8) Select "Trusted Sites Check Mark Circle"
    > 9) Select "SITES", uncheck "Require Server Verification" - you will be
    > adding the normal and secure sites in here that you trust, if you don't
    > uncheck this you can't enter non-secure sites in this list.
    > 10) Type "http://v4.windowsupdate.microsoft.com" in the ADD box and
    > click ADD
    > 11) Type "http://Windowsupdate.microsoft.com" in the ADD box and click
    > ADD, click OK to close window
    > 12) Click "Default Level" then change to "Medium".
    > 13) Select "Privacy" tab, set to MEDIUM HIGH
    > 14) Select "General" tab, select "Temporary Internet Files - Settings"
    > 15) Select "Every visit to the page"
    > 16) Select 20MB for the temp internet files size, click OK
    > 17) Select "Advanced" Tab
    > 18) Uncheck both "Enable Install On Demand" items
    > 19) Uncheck "Enable third-party browser extensions"
    > 20) Uncheck "Play Animations, sounds, videos in web pages"
    > 21) Select/Check "Empty Temporary Internet file folder..."
    > 22) Click OK to close the settings window
    >
    > Now, when you browse to a site you want to trust, it's not going to
    > work, you are going to have to ADD the site to the TRUSTED SITES in the
    > OPTIONS / SECURITY tab. This can be a real pain, but it can save your
    > butt when it comes to sites that can compromise your system.
    >
    > You will find that after the first week that you are not adding sites to
    > the list any more and that you're experience is a lot nicer, less pop-
    > ups, and less chance for something to hack your browser.
    >
    > Don't forget, you should only ADD TRUSTED SITES to the list. Even if you
    > make a mistake, we set the TRUSTED SITES to MEDIUM in stead of it's
    > default LOW, but you really want to limit the ones you add to verifiable
    > commercial quality sites.
    >
    > --
    > --
    >
    > (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    John Gregory, Feb 27, 2004
    #16
  17. John Gregory

    Leythos Guest

    In article <LHJ%b.3406$>, jaygreg90
    @hotmail.com says...
    > Leythos,
    >
    > One small problem... apparently after I installed SpyBot I never tried
    > accessing the net. When I fired up that machine this morning, it wouldn't
    > access through my browser IE nor Outlook. I then reconfigured my firewall (I
    > didn't. The program did.) and everything seems to be working fine.


    I can assure you that SpyBot did nothing to your firewall application,
    it can't, there is nothing in the code to do that. This sounds like a
    Windows Update or Firewall Update issue to me.

    > Instruction for installing SpyBot did say to make sure nothing was runnig.
    > But I've always let my anti virus and firewall run during installations and
    > have never noticed a problem.


    I always leave mine running to, never had a problem either.

    > Should these two be shut down as well when I install on my XP machine?
    > Perhaps what I observed was merely an unrelated glich that somehow
    > straightened itself out.


    I've never seen SBS&D do anything wrong on any computer we've installed
    it on, in fact, I've never seen it hurt anything on any machine.

    There is a fake SBS&D out there, could you have got that one?

    [snip]

    It's always better to BOTTOM reply and snip the parts you don't need to
    show in the reply when using Usenet.

    Anyway, I hope it's all working for you now.


    --
    --

    (Remove 999 to reply to me)
    Leythos, Feb 27, 2004
    #17
    1. Advertising

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