scam

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Ionizer, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. Ionizer

    Ionizer Guest

    "ivan clough" <> wrote in message
    news:cj3tfl$234$...
    > Hi'
    > I have just received an email informing me that my email addy was used

    to
    > win me a $2 million lottery prize.
    > All I have to do is contact someone call Dr. Harry Thompson.
    > It is unfortunately, a scam, but to what purpose I have
    > no idea.
    > Can anyone spread any light on the subjects?
    > I have emailed the good doctor, and am awaiting his response.
    > I will not open any attachments or send any money for what
    > ever reason, so what else should I beware of


    Dr. Harry may need a bit of money to process your prize, or he may need
    some personal information to verify your identity. (It would be
    irresponsible of him to just fire off a cheque to somebody "claiming" to
    be the real Ivan Clough.) And he might need some of your banking
    information if he intends to deposit the prize in your account.

    Don't fool around with him too much- these aren't nice people.

    Regards,
    Ian.
    Ionizer, Sep 25, 2004
    #1
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  2. Ionizer

    ivan clough Guest

    Hi'
    I have just received an email informing me that my email addy was used to
    win me a $2 million lottery prize.
    All I have to do is contact someone call Dr. Harry Thompson.
    It is unfortunately, a scam, but to what purpose I have
    no idea.
    Can anyone spread any light on the subjects?
    I have emailed the good doctor, and am awaiting his response.
    I will not open any attachments or send any money for what
    ever reason, so what else should I beware of
    TIA
    Ivan


    --
    www.goodforu2.co.uk
    ivan clough, Sep 25, 2004
    #2
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  3. In article <cj3tfl$234$>, ivan clough says...

    > I have just received an email informing me that my email addy was used to
    > win me a $2 million lottery prize.
    > All I have to do is contact someone call Dr. Harry Thompson.
    > It is unfortunately, a scam, but to what purpose I have
    > no idea.
    > Can anyone spread any light on the subjects?
    > I have emailed the good doctor, and am awaiting his response.
    > I will not open any attachments or send any money for what
    > ever reason, so what else should I beware of


    Well, you have just verified to the spammer that you are a spam reader, and
    that your email address is active. Expect even more such offers.

    You are right; it is a scam. The purpose is pretty obvious, if you have been
    around a while. The "winner" is told that they need to pay a "handling fee",
    or something similar, in order to process the winning pay out. I don't know,
    maybe they actually string the mark along for a few such fees; until the
    mark finally becomes suspicious and stops sending money.

    Your only options for handling such email are to either learn how to
    identify the responsible parties, and file complaints, or just to delete the
    message unread. Deleting spam unread is far preferable to actually
    contacting the spammer.

    --
    Norman
    ~Win dain a lotica, En vai tu ri, Si lo ta
    ~Fin dein a loluca, En dragu a sei lain
    ~Vi fa-ru les shutai am, En riga-lint
    Norman Miller, Sep 25, 2004
    #3
  4. Ionizer

    Joel Rubin Guest

    On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 15:24:22 +0100, "ivan clough"
    <> wrote:

    >Hi'
    >I have just received an email informing me that my email addy was used to
    >win me a $2 million lottery prize.
    >All I have to do is contact someone call Dr. Harry Thompson.
    >It is unfortunately, a scam, but to what purpose I have
    >no idea.
    >Can anyone spread any light on the subjects?
    >I have emailed the good doctor, and am awaiting his response.
    >I will not open any attachments or send any money for what
    >ever reason, so what else should I beware of
    >TIA



    So did I. I've received hundreds of similar emails.

    BBC-TV and the New York Daily News, among others, have had stories
    about this. It's a variation on the Nigerian 419.

    You'll be asked to pay taxes and this fee and that fee and that other
    fee and you'll never see the first penny of your winnings.

    In at least one case, the "agent for the lottery" had a website where
    he collected your bank account info, like in a "phish".

    Complain to support at handbag.com and abuse at newskies.com. (at
    least using the headers I got.)

    From my email:

    >Your email address attached to ticket number :77770054689 with serial num=


    http://pandora.idnes.cz/part/2004/7/15523

    A Czech mailing list also had winning number 77770054689.

    They're probably beginning to change the winning numbers a bit because
    they used to use the same winning numbers for months and even years
    and I think some ISP's were filtering on them.
    Joel Rubin, Sep 25, 2004
    #4
  5. Ionizer

    Joel Rubin Guest

    With apologies to the ghosts of Yip Harburg and Groucho Marx, I have
    thought up the following lyrics (to the tune of "Lydia the Tatooed
    Lady")

    Fraudo El Fraudo oh you've won El Fraudo
    El Fraudo the big spam lottery
    It's got fees that scammers adore so
    And Nigerians even more so

    Fraudo El Fraudo oh you've won El Fraudo
    El Fraudo the King of Turds

    I once knew a man who won 20 mil
    They told him to talk to agent Bill
    He was down forty thousand when Bill took a pill
    You can learn a lot from scammers.
    Joel Rubin, Sep 25, 2004
    #5
  6. Ionizer

    ivan clough Guest

    Hi,
    Thanks for the feed back.
    Too right, I will not be entering into any sort of discussion
    with the "Dr.".
    I am tempted to tell him to shove the $2 million up his
    anus dollar by dollar...BUT...what the hell!
    Cheers
    Ivan

    "Joel Rubin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 15:24:22 +0100, "ivan clough"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi'
    > >I have just received an email informing me that my email addy was used to
    > >win me a $2 million lottery prize.
    > >All I have to do is contact someone call Dr. Harry Thompson.
    > >It is unfortunately, a scam, but to what purpose I have
    > >no idea.
    > >Can anyone spread any light on the subjects?
    > >I have emailed the good doctor, and am awaiting his response.
    > >I will not open any attachments or send any money for what
    > >ever reason, so what else should I beware of
    > >TIA

    >
    >
    > So did I. I've received hundreds of similar emails.
    >
    > BBC-TV and the New York Daily News, among others, have had stories
    > about this. It's a variation on the Nigerian 419.
    >
    > You'll be asked to pay taxes and this fee and that fee and that other
    > fee and you'll never see the first penny of your winnings.
    >
    > In at least one case, the "agent for the lottery" had a website where
    > he collected your bank account info, like in a "phish".
    >
    > Complain to support at handbag.com and abuse at newskies.com. (at
    > least using the headers I got.)
    >
    > From my email:
    >
    > >Your email address attached to ticket number :77770054689 with serial

    num=
    >
    > http://pandora.idnes.cz/part/2004/7/15523
    >
    > A Czech mailing list also had winning number 77770054689.
    >
    > They're probably beginning to change the winning numbers a bit because
    > they used to use the same winning numbers for months and even years
    > and I think some ISP's were filtering on them.
    >
    >
    ivan clough, Sep 25, 2004
    #6
  7. Ionizer

    Ionizer Guest

    "Joel Rubin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > With apologies to the ghosts of Yip Harburg and Groucho Marx, I have
    > thought up the following lyrics (to the tune of "Lydia the Tatooed
    > Lady")
    >
    > Fraudo El Fraudo oh you've won El Fraudo
    > El Fraudo the big spam lottery
    > It's got fees that scammers adore so
    > And Nigerians even more so
    >
    > Fraudo El Fraudo oh you've won El Fraudo
    > El Fraudo the King of Turds
    >
    > I once knew a man who won 20 mil
    > They told him to talk to agent Bill
    > He was down forty thousand when Bill took a pill
    > You can learn a lot from scammers.
    >


    Well, don't stop there. Get busy with this freeware:
    http://www.karaokeanything.com/ and post your performance to one of the
    binaries groups as soon as possible.

    Regards,
    Ian.
    (Now Playing: Sing - The Carpenters)
    Ionizer, Sep 25, 2004
    #7
  8. Ionizer

    proprclr Guest

    On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 10:17:21 -0400, "Ionizer" <> wrote:

    >"ivan clough" <> wrote in message
    >news:cj3tfl$234$...
    >> Hi'
    >> I have just received an email informing me that my email addy was used

    >to
    >> win me a $2 million lottery prize.
    >> All I have to do is contact someone call Dr. Harry Thompson.
    >> It is unfortunately, a scam, but to what purpose I have
    >> no idea.
    >> Can anyone spread any light on the subjects?
    >> I have emailed the good doctor, and am awaiting his response.
    >> I will not open any attachments or send any money for what
    >> ever reason, so what else should I beware of

    >
    >Dr. Harry may>>>>>>>>>>> need a bit of money to process your prize,<<<<<<<<<< or he may need


    !!!!SCAM! SCAM! SCAM!!!!! They should never need any money from you to

    process your prise(sic), especialy when they are giving away money!

    >some personal information to verify your identity. (It would be
    >irresponsible of him to just fire off a cheque to somebody "claiming" to
    >be the real Ivan Clough.) And he might need some of your banking
    >information if he intends to deposit the prize in your account.


    In other words, this "DR." is just someone looking for ways to get
    into your financial pants.

    >
    >Don't fool around with him too much- these aren't nice people.



    Defently.

    >
    >Regards,
    >Ian.
    >
    >
    proprclr, Sep 26, 2004
    #8
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