Saving digital images to iPod

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by IRO, Jun 9, 2006.

  1. IRO

    IRO Guest

    Just back from a month's holiday, with 2000-odd photos in the can. The
    can in this case is a 30GB iPod Video, which was periodically hooked to
    my Panasonic FZ30 with Apple's Camera Connect.

    As expected for an Apple product the system works pretty smoothly, but I
    managed to lose some photos due to a couple of fish-hooks. Firstly, the
    iPod couldn't cope with camera cards 1GB or bigger because it takes
    longer to download the contents than a fully charged battery can run the
    iPod. During a dump, the hard drive is running continuously, something
    that doesn't happen normally. When the battery runs out the iPod deletes
    everything already copied and shuts down (Nice one, Apple!!)

    The workaround in my case (eventually) was to download about 500MB then
    Stop and Save. Followed by a very slow process of deleting the images
    from the camera that had been copied so they wouldn't be recopied on the
    next run after a recharge.

    That's where I struck the second fish-hook. When I was getting very low
    on space, I deleted a lot of dud images scattered across the card. The
    problem is that although their replacements were taken just before the
    download, the files are actually mixed in with photos taken days
    earlier. On the iPod Video, they appear on the same 'Roll' as the
    earlier shots, albeit at the end. I got confused as to just where I had
    safely copied to and it was here, I think, the lost photos went AWOL.

    LESSON 1: Don't use cards larger than 512MB. Really fast cards might get
    away with it but there's some merit in having your eggs in more than one
    basket anyway. If you have a bigger card already, resist the temptation
    to overfill it.

    LESSON 2: Don't erase images and over-write. Better to keep everything
    clean & tidy and move onto another card. See lesson 1.

    LESSON 3: It may be worthwhile to take an iPod Dock with you so you can
    keep the iPod on mains power during the downloads. Yeah, yeah, something
    else to lug around when you're on holiday. It's bad enough having to
    carry camera battery & cell phone chargers, mains adaptors, assorted
    cables and all that junk....

    LESSON 4: If you need to retrieve only some images from the iPod,
    they're hidden in the DCIM folder with the Rolls in numerical order but
    renamed "###APPLE". Ask iPhoto to import from there.

    LESSON 5: Be VERY careful when Browsing a Roll of images. You're only a
    tiny slip of the finger away from accidently Deleting that Roll.

    Now that I'm older and wiser I can recommend the iPod as a backup for
    serious holiday digital photography, although it did get a bit fraught
    for a while there.

    --
    ~IRO
    (enzed = nz)
     
    IRO, Jun 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. IRO

    Roy G Guest

    "IRO" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just back from a month's holiday, with 2000-odd photos in the can. The
    > can in this case is a 30GB iPod Video, which was periodically hooked to
    > my Panasonic FZ30 with Apple's Camera Connect.
    >
    > As expected for an Apple product the system works pretty smoothly, but I
    > managed to lose some photos due to a couple of fish-hooks. Firstly, the
    > iPod couldn't cope with camera cards 1GB or bigger because it takes
    > longer to download the contents than a fully charged battery can run the
    > iPod. During a dump, the hard drive is running continuously, something
    > that doesn't happen normally. When the battery runs out the iPod deletes
    > everything already copied and shuts down (Nice one, Apple!!)
    >
    > The workaround in my case (eventually) was to download about 500MB then
    > Stop and Save. Followed by a very slow process of deleting the images
    > from the camera that had been copied so they wouldn't be recopied on the
    > next run after a recharge.
    >
    > That's where I struck the second fish-hook. When I was getting very low
    > on space, I deleted a lot of dud images scattered across the card. The
    > problem is that although their replacements were taken just before the
    > download, the files are actually mixed in with photos taken days
    > earlier. On the iPod Video, they appear on the same 'Roll' as the
    > earlier shots, albeit at the end. I got confused as to just where I had
    > safely copied to and it was here, I think, the lost photos went AWOL.
    >
    > LESSON 1: Don't use cards larger than 512MB. Really fast cards might get
    > away with it but there's some merit in having your eggs in more than one
    > basket anyway. If you have a bigger card already, resist the temptation
    > to overfill it.
    >
    > LESSON 2: Don't erase images and over-write. Better to keep everything
    > clean & tidy and move onto another card. See lesson 1.
    >
    > LESSON 3: It may be worthwhile to take an iPod Dock with you so you can
    > keep the iPod on mains power during the downloads. Yeah, yeah, something
    > else to lug around when you're on holiday. It's bad enough having to
    > carry camera battery & cell phone chargers, mains adaptors, assorted
    > cables and all that junk....
    >
    > LESSON 4: If you need to retrieve only some images from the iPod,
    > they're hidden in the DCIM folder with the Rolls in numerical order but
    > renamed "###APPLE". Ask iPhoto to import from there.
    >
    > LESSON 5: Be VERY careful when Browsing a Roll of images. You're only a
    > tiny slip of the finger away from accidently Deleting that Roll.
    >
    > Now that I'm older and wiser I can recommend the iPod as a backup for
    > serious holiday digital photography, although it did get a bit fraught
    > for a while there.
    >
    > --
    > ~IRO
    > (enzed = nz


    This is perfect example of "Mac Blinkers".

    He has recommended this Ipod, after explaining rather a lot of problems. It
    can't even download 1 Gig of images in one run.

    This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should buy
    one of these badly designed things.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Jun 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. IRO

    Tony Rice Guest

    "Roy G" <> wrote in
    news:Jdeig.14309$:

    > This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    > buy one of these badly designed things.


    The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.

    As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not what it
    was designed for.
     
    Tony Rice, Jun 9, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <Jdeig.14309$>, Roy G
    <> wrote:

    > This is perfect example of "Mac Blinkers".


    PC moron

    > He has recommended this Ipod, after explaining rather a lot of problems. It
    > can't even download 1 Gig of images in one run.
    >
    > This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should buy
    > one of these badly designed things.


    The iPod was designed for playing music.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jun 9, 2006
    #4
  5. IRO

    Pete D Guest

    "Randall Ainsworth" <> wrote in message
    news:090620060630484094%...
    > In article <Jdeig.14309$>, Roy G
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> This is perfect example of "Mac Blinkers".

    >
    > PC moron
    >
    >> He has recommended this Ipod, after explaining rather a lot of problems.
    >> It
    >> can't even download 1 Gig of images in one run.
    >>
    >> This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    >> buy
    >> one of these badly designed things.

    >
    > The iPod was designed for playing music.


    It is still touted as a photo holder!!
     
    Pete D, Jun 9, 2006
    #5
  6. IRO

    Pete D Guest

    "Tony Rice" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns97DD5CAE8E45Djkl123iop@216.196.97.131...
    > "Roy G" <> wrote in
    > news:Jdeig.14309$:
    >
    >> This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    >> buy one of these badly designed things.

    >
    > The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.
    >
    > As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not what
    > it
    > was designed for.


    It is now and video!
     
    Pete D, Jun 9, 2006
    #6
  7. IRO

    J. Clarke Guest

    Roy G wrote:

    > "IRO" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Just back from a month's holiday, with 2000-odd photos in the can. The
    >> can in this case is a 30GB iPod Video, which was periodically hooked to
    >> my Panasonic FZ30 with Apple's Camera Connect.
    >>
    >> As expected for an Apple product the system works pretty smoothly, but I
    >> managed to lose some photos due to a couple of fish-hooks. Firstly, the
    >> iPod couldn't cope with camera cards 1GB or bigger because it takes
    >> longer to download the contents than a fully charged battery can run the
    >> iPod. During a dump, the hard drive is running continuously, something
    >> that doesn't happen normally. When the battery runs out the iPod deletes
    >> everything already copied and shuts down (Nice one, Apple!!)
    >>
    >> The workaround in my case (eventually) was to download about 500MB then
    >> Stop and Save. Followed by a very slow process of deleting the images
    >> from the camera that had been copied so they wouldn't be recopied on the
    >> next run after a recharge.
    >>
    >> That's where I struck the second fish-hook. When I was getting very low
    >> on space, I deleted a lot of dud images scattered across the card. The
    >> problem is that although their replacements were taken just before the
    >> download, the files are actually mixed in with photos taken days
    >> earlier. On the iPod Video, they appear on the same 'Roll' as the
    >> earlier shots, albeit at the end. I got confused as to just where I had
    >> safely copied to and it was here, I think, the lost photos went AWOL.
    >>
    >> LESSON 1: Don't use cards larger than 512MB. Really fast cards might get
    >> away with it but there's some merit in having your eggs in more than one
    >> basket anyway. If you have a bigger card already, resist the temptation
    >> to overfill it.
    >>
    >> LESSON 2: Don't erase images and over-write. Better to keep everything
    >> clean & tidy and move onto another card. See lesson 1.
    >>
    >> LESSON 3: It may be worthwhile to take an iPod Dock with you so you can
    >> keep the iPod on mains power during the downloads. Yeah, yeah, something
    >> else to lug around when you're on holiday. It's bad enough having to
    >> carry camera battery & cell phone chargers, mains adaptors, assorted
    >> cables and all that junk....
    >>
    >> LESSON 4: If you need to retrieve only some images from the iPod,
    >> they're hidden in the DCIM folder with the Rolls in numerical order but
    >> renamed "###APPLE". Ask iPhoto to import from there.
    >>
    >> LESSON 5: Be VERY careful when Browsing a Roll of images. You're only a
    >> tiny slip of the finger away from accidently Deleting that Roll.
    >>
    >> Now that I'm older and wiser I can recommend the iPod as a backup for
    >> serious holiday digital photography, although it did get a bit fraught
    >> for a while there.
    >>
    >> --
    >> ~IRO
    >> (enzed = nz

    >
    > This is perfect example of "Mac Blinkers".
    >
    > He has recommended this Ipod, after explaining rather a lot of problems.
    > It can't even download 1 Gig of images in one run.
    >
    > This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should buy
    > one of these badly designed things.


    I'm reminded of a physician who Richard Hooker (author of M*A*S*H, and
    himself a medical doctor) once described--the fellow was very
    useful--whenever Hooker was having problems with a diagnosis he would call
    in this fellow for a consultation. The fellow was a brilliant analyst, who
    point by point identified and went through every single salient aspect of
    the case, then, having clearly spelled out the analysis in terms that would
    lead the greenest intern to the right diagnosis, he invariably ignored all
    his own careful analysis and came up with something totally off the wall.
    Meanwhile, Hooker, with analysis in hand, was able to easily arrive at the
    correct diagnosis.


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 9, 2006
    #7
  8. IRO

    J. Clarke Guest

    Pete D wrote:

    >
    > "Tony Rice" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns97DD5CAE8E45Djkl123iop@216.196.97.131...
    >> "Roy G" <> wrote in
    >> news:Jdeig.14309$:
    >>
    >>> This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    >>> buy one of these badly designed things.

    >>
    >> The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.
    >>
    >> As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not what
    >> it
    >> was designed for.

    >
    > It is now and video!


    That's like saying that a cheap video camera is designed for taking stills.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 9, 2006
    #8
  9. IRO

    Pete D Guest

    "J. Clarke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Pete D wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Tony Rice" <> wrote in message
    >> news:Xns97DD5CAE8E45Djkl123iop@216.196.97.131...
    >>> "Roy G" <> wrote in
    >>> news:Jdeig.14309$:
    >>>
    >>>> This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    >>>> buy one of these badly designed things.
    >>>
    >>> The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.
    >>>
    >>> As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not what
    >>> it
    >>> was designed for.

    >>
    >> It is now and video!

    >
    > That's like saying that a cheap video camera is designed for taking
    > stills.
    >


    Nothing like it, the Ipod is just a storage device, my X'Drive plays MP3's
    perfectly and still does its primary funtion of storing files perfectly as
    well.
     
    Pete D, Jun 9, 2006
    #9
  10. IRO

    J. Clarke Guest

    Pete D wrote:

    >
    > "J. Clarke" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Pete D wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Tony Rice" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:Xns97DD5CAE8E45Djkl123iop@216.196.97.131...
    >>>> "Roy G" <> wrote in
    >>>> news:Jdeig.14309$:
    >>>>
    >>>>> This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    >>>>> buy one of these badly designed things.
    >>>>
    >>>> The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.
    >>>>
    >>>> As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not
    >>>> what it
    >>>> was designed for.
    >>>
    >>> It is now and video!

    >>
    >> That's like saying that a cheap video camera is designed for taking
    >> stills.
    >>

    >
    > Nothing like it, the Ipod is just a storage device,


    In that case a camera is "just a storage device".

    > my X'Drive plays MP3's
    > perfectly and still does its primary funtion of storing files perfectly as
    > well.


    Then it sounds like it does far better than the allegedly purposely designed
    ipod in that regard.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 9, 2006
    #10
  11. IRO

    Kevin Agard Guest

    Tony Rice wrote:
    > "Roy G" <> wrote in
    > news:Jdeig.14309$:
    >
    >
    >>This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    >>buy one of these badly designed things.

    >
    >
    > The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.
    >
    > As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not what it
    > was designed for.


    But that's exactly what they are marketing these things as. . . .
     
    Kevin Agard, Jun 10, 2006
    #11
  12. In article <Xns97DD5CAE8E45Djkl123iop@216.196.97.131>,
    Tony Rice <> wrote:

    > "Roy G" <> wrote in
    > news:Jdeig.14309$:
    >
    > > This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should
    > > buy one of these badly designed things.

    >
    > The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.
    >
    > As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not what it
    > was designed for.


    On the contrary, it works very well if you keep it simple. Everything
    has limitations and the iPod is no exception. Travellers who enjoy
    carrying their music with them can be assured that if there is a few gig
    of space available, it is VERY easy to both dump the contents of their
    camera to the iPod and to retrieve those images to iPhoto when they get
    home. Problems may appear if you push the boundaries, but that's a
    universal truism.

    --
    ~Dibley
     
    Dibley Fanshaw, Jun 10, 2006
    #12
  13. IRO

    cjcampbell Guest

    Roy G wrote:
    >
    > This is perfect example of "Mac Blinkers".
    >
    > He has recommended this Ipod, after explaining rather a lot of problems. It
    > can't even download 1 Gig of images in one run.
    >


    That is a bit of a stretch, isn't it? The only iPod problem was
    inadequate battery life. Shoot, most image storage devices either
    require that you plug them in or they are much bigger and heavier in
    order to accomodate a beefier battery.

    The iPod is primarily a music player. Yes, it will store pictures, but
    it is not sold as a bulk storage device for vast numbers of photos. It
    was designed to handle a few hundred megabytes of data at once, which
    is how most consumers would treat it. Heck, most consumers don't have a
    storage card of over 256 megabytes. Transferring more than that becomes
    a race as to which battery will die first -- the iPod's or the
    camera's. I would bet that the iPod will outlast a lot of cameras.

    So, really, I cannot recommend the iPod for storing photos pending
    transfer to the computer. In fact, I have not seen a bulk storage
    device that I can recommend. I simply don't think that the iPod or any
    other device of this kind is an adequate substitute for a laptop.

    The iPod is supposed to have some planner functions, too, but I doubt
    if they are any better than what I have on my cell phone. Does that
    mean that the iPod has "rather a lot of problems" because it will not
    dial a contact in its planner?

    > This post would seem to give rather a lot of reasons why no-one should buy
    > one of these badly designed things.
    >


    It gave one reason, not "rather a lot of reasons." If I wanted a music
    player (which I don't) or something to show a few pictures on a tiny
    screen (which I don't), then I would consider an iPod. Since I do not
    want either of those things an iPod does not interest me. If Apple ever
    releases a cell phone iPod, maybe I will look at it, but it will have
    to offer something special to pry me away from any other cell phone or
    even a Blackberry.
     
    cjcampbell, Jun 10, 2006
    #13
  14. IRO

    Roy G Guest

    "IRO" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just back from a month's holiday, with 2000-odd photos in the can. The
    > can in this case is a 30GB iPod Video, which was periodically hooked to
    > my Panasonic FZ30 with Apple's Camera Connect.
    >
    > As expected for an Apple product the system works pretty smoothly, but I
    > managed to lose some photos due to a couple of fish-hooks. Firstly, the
    > iPod couldn't cope with camera cards 1GB or bigger because it takes
    > longer to download the contents than a fully charged battery can run the
    > iPod. During a dump, the hard drive is running continuously, something
    > that doesn't happen normally. When the battery runs out the iPod deletes
    > everything already copied and shuts down (Nice one, Apple!!)
    >
    > The workaround in my case (eventually) was to download about 500MB then
    > Stop and Save. Followed by a very slow process of deleting the images
    > from the camera that had been copied so they wouldn't be recopied on the
    > next run after a recharge.
    >
    > That's where I struck the second fish-hook. When I was getting very low
    > on space, I deleted a lot of dud images scattered across the card. The
    > problem is that although their replacements were taken just before the
    > download, the files are actually mixed in with photos taken days
    > earlier. On the iPod Video, they appear on the same 'Roll' as the
    > earlier shots, albeit at the end. I got confused as to just where I had
    > safely copied to and it was here, I think, the lost photos went AWOL.
    >
    > LESSON 1: Don't use cards larger than 512MB. Really fast cards might get
    > away with it but there's some merit in having your eggs in more than one
    > basket anyway. If you have a bigger card already, resist the temptation
    > to overfill it.
    >
    > LESSON 2: Don't erase images and over-write. Better to keep everything
    > clean & tidy and move onto another card. See lesson 1.
    >
    > LESSON 3: It may be worthwhile to take an iPod Dock with you so you can
    > keep the iPod on mains power during the downloads. Yeah, yeah, something
    > else to lug around when you're on holiday. It's bad enough having to
    > carry camera battery & cell phone chargers, mains adaptors, assorted
    > cables and all that junk....
    >
    > LESSON 4: If you need to retrieve only some images from the iPod,
    > they're hidden in the DCIM folder with the Rolls in numerical order but
    > renamed "###APPLE". Ask iPhoto to import from there.
    >
    > LESSON 5: Be VERY careful when Browsing a Roll of images. You're only a
    > tiny slip of the finger away from accidently Deleting that Roll.
    >
    > Now that I'm older and wiser I can recommend the iPod as a backup for
    > serious holiday digital photography, although it did get a bit fraught
    > for a while there.
    >
    > --
    > ~IRO
    > (enzed = nz)


    Hi again.

    Quite interesting responses. Well, some of them were.

    I am a "PC Moron" because I dared to criticise an Apple product.

    I did not criticise any-"thing". I criticised a poster who listed 5 major
    problems and then finished by doing an about turn and recommending that
    product for Photo Storage.

    I have been told it was not designed as a Photo Storage Device, it is a MP3
    Player. That would seem to me to be yet another very good reason why
    Photographers should not buy it for Photo Storage. It certainly seems to be
    excellent for storing and playing music, but that is not what this poster
    was advocating it should be used for.

    There do seem to be a certain group, who believe that all Apple Products are
    wonderful, even when the particular product can only just manage, (with
    considerable difficulty and workarounds), to do what it was advertised and
    bought for.

    Hence my remark about the Blinkers.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Jun 10, 2006
    #14
  15. IRO

    Tony Rice Guest

    Kevin Agard <> wrote in
    news:XBrig.2358$%m5.1356@trnddc04:

    >> The iPod is designed very well as an MP3 player.
    >>
    >> As a digital photo storage device, it's not so good, but that's not
    >> what it was designed for.

    >
    > But that's exactly what they are marketing these things as. . . .


    They are marketing them as displaying tiny thumbnails of photos transfered
    there by iTunes software.

    Aren't all of these CF Card interfaces and similar add-ons 3rd party
    devices?
     
    Tony Rice, Jun 10, 2006
    #15
  16. IRO

    Tim Guest

    > "IRO" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Just back from a month's holiday, with 2000-odd photos in the can.
    >> The can in this case is a 30GB iPod Video, which was periodically
    >> hooked to my Panasonic FZ30 with Apple's Camera Connect.
    >>
    >> As expected for an Apple product the system works pretty smoothly,
    >> but I managed to lose some photos due to a couple of fish-hooks.
    >> Firstly, the iPod couldn't cope with camera cards 1GB or bigger
    >> because it takes longer to download the contents than a fully
    >> charged battery can run the iPod. During a dump, the hard drive is
    >> running continuously, something that doesn't happen normally. When
    >> the battery runs out the iPod deletes everything already copied and
    >> shuts down (Nice one, Apple!!) The workaround in my case (eventually) was
    >> to download about 500MB
    >> then Stop and Save. Followed by a very slow process of deleting the
    >> images from the camera that had been copied so they wouldn't be
    >> recopied on the next run after a recharge.
    >>
    >> That's where I struck the second fish-hook. When I was getting very
    >> low on space, I deleted a lot of dud images scattered across the
    >> card. The problem is that although their replacements were taken
    >> just before the download, the files are actually mixed in with
    >> photos taken days earlier. On the iPod Video, they appear on the
    >> same 'Roll' as the earlier shots, albeit at the end. I got confused
    >> as to just where I had safely copied to and it was here, I think,
    >> the lost photos went AWOL. LESSON 1: Don't use cards larger than 512MB.
    >> Really fast cards might
    >> get away with it but there's some merit in having your eggs in more
    >> than one basket anyway. If you have a bigger card already, resist
    >> the temptation to overfill it.
    >>
    >> LESSON 2: Don't erase images and over-write. Better to keep
    >> everything clean & tidy and move onto another card. See lesson 1.
    >>
    >> LESSON 3: It may be worthwhile to take an iPod Dock with you so you
    >> can keep the iPod on mains power during the downloads. Yeah, yeah,
    >> something else to lug around when you're on holiday. It's bad enough
    >> having to carry camera battery & cell phone chargers, mains
    >> adaptors, assorted cables and all that junk....
    >>
    >> LESSON 4: If you need to retrieve only some images from the iPod,
    >> they're hidden in the DCIM folder with the Rolls in numerical order
    >> but renamed "###APPLE". Ask iPhoto to import from there.
    >>
    >> LESSON 5: Be VERY careful when Browsing a Roll of images. You're
    >> only a tiny slip of the finger away from accidently Deleting that
    >> Roll. Now that I'm older and wiser I can recommend the iPod as a backup
    >> for
    >> serious holiday digital photography, although it did get a bit
    >> fraught for a while there.
    >>
    >> --
    >> ~IRO
    >> (enzed = nz)

    >
    > Hi again.
    >
    > Quite interesting responses. Well, some of them were.
    >
    > I am a "PC Moron" because I dared to criticise an Apple product.
    >
    > I did not criticise any-"thing". I criticised a poster who listed 5
    > major problems and then finished by doing an about turn and
    > recommending that product for Photo Storage.
    >
    > I have been told it was not designed as a Photo Storage Device, it is
    > a MP3 Player. That would seem to me to be yet another very good
    > reason why Photographers should not buy it for Photo Storage. It
    > certainly seems to be excellent for storing and playing music, but
    > that is not what this poster was advocating it should be used for.
    >
    > There do seem to be a certain group, who believe that all Apple
    > Products are wonderful, even when the particular product can only
    > just manage, (with considerable difficulty and workarounds), to do
    > what it was advertised and bought for.
    >
    > Hence my remark about the Blinkers.
    >
    > Roy G


    Hi

    Anyone had experience with loading 1Gb cards onto an i``Photo pod with a
    Belkin card reader?
    Just wondered if there were similar issues

    TIA

    Tim
     
    Tim, Jun 10, 2006
    #16
  17. IRO

    IRO Guest

    In article <I%vig.7148$>,
    "Roy G" <> wrote:

    > Quite interesting responses. Well, some of them were.
    >
    > I am a "PC Moron" because I dared to criticise an Apple product.


    No Roy, it was because you knee-jerked with emotive terms as "these
    badly designed things". When the sales of iPod accessories is greater
    than the combined sales of all other MP3 players, Apple must be doing
    something right.

    > I did not criticise any-"thing". I criticised a poster who listed 5 major
    > problems and then finished by doing an about turn and recommending that
    > product for Photo Storage.


    They weren't major things. If I had only been using my wife's Canon
    which has a 256MB card or had bought a high speed card for my Panasonic,
    I wouldn't have even been aware of the limitations of the iPod.

    > I have been told it was not designed as a Photo Storage Device, it is a MP3
    > Player. That would seem to me to be yet another very good reason why
    > Photographers should not buy it for Photo Storage. It certainly seems to be
    > excellent for storing and playing music, but that is not what this poster
    > was advocating it should be used for.


    As it turns out, subject to certain limitations, the iPod, combined with
    Apple's Camera Connect adaptor, is an excellent Photo storage. The
    images can be reviewed on a screen rather better than anything I've seen
    on a digital camera and they can be copied to a computer very easily for
    further processing & printing.

    > There do seem to be a certain group, who believe that all Apple Products are
    > wonderful, even when the particular product can only just manage, (with
    > considerable difficulty and workarounds), to do what it was advertised and
    > bought for.
    >
    > Hence my remark about the Blinkers.


    I bought the iPod for music and videos. I was delighted to find it could
    also back up photos (as well as conventional computer files*). Both my
    wife and daughter's Canon cameras worked seamlessly, only the Panasonic,
    with an unusually large & slow card ran into problems that were bypassed
    once I figured out what was happening.

    --
    ~IRO
    (enzed = nz)
    (*When we got back to my daughter's place in London, the same iPod was
    used to back up her iBook's hard drive before upgrading the OS to Tiger.
    And yes, we did use it for playing music while we were traveling. A very
    useful device.)
     
    IRO, Jun 10, 2006
    #17
  18. IRO

    cjcampbell Guest

    Roy G wrote:
    >
    > Quite interesting responses. Well, some of them were.
    >
    > I am a "PC Moron" because I dared to criticise an Apple product.
    >
    > I did not criticise any-"thing". I criticised a poster who listed 5 major
    > problems and then finished by doing an about turn and recommending that
    > product for Photo Storage.
    >


    Calling product very poorly designed sure sounds like criticism.
    Perhaps you have some new definition of criticism that excludes remarks
    like that.

    The iPod does not appear to me be particularly poorly designed. I think
    it is a case of someone trying to get a toy to do high capacity work.
    But the fact that it is only a toy does not mean that it is poorly
    designed. It works well as a toy. It does not work well for storing, at
    one bite, many gigabytes of photos.

    > I have been told it was not designed as a Photo Storage Device, it is a MP3
    > Player. That would seem to me to be yet another very good reason why
    > Photographers should not buy it for Photo Storage. It certainly seems to be
    > excellent for storing and playing music, but that is not what this poster
    > was advocating it should be used for.
    >
    > There do seem to be a certain group, who believe that all Apple Products are
    > wonderful, even when the particular product can only just manage, (with
    > considerable difficulty and workarounds), to do what it was advertised and
    > bought for.
    >
    > Hence my remark about the Blinkers.
    >


    I suspect the remark about the "PC morons" was because someone mistook
    you for being a member of that particular group who seems to believe
    that all Apple products are terrible, even when the product does
    precisely what it was designed to do.
     
    cjcampbell, Jun 12, 2006
    #18
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