sata hard drive.

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by F Murtz, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. F Murtz

    F Murtz Guest

    I have a drive. XP said it was RAW I formatted it with xp .The format
    went to 90% or so then xp said it can not complete format. Now the drive
    is not recognised. it does not exist. How can I find it again?
     
    F Murtz, Jan 6, 2009
    #1
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  2. F Murtz

    Paul Guest

    F Murtz wrote:
    > I have a drive. XP said it was RAW I formatted it with xp .The format
    > went to 90% or so then xp said it can not complete format. Now the drive
    > is not recognised. it does not exist. How can I find it again?


    Many manufacturers offer a diagnostic program on their web site,
    available for download. Run the diagnostic and see if the drive
    reports an error. You would use a Seagate diagnostic for a
    Seagate drive. The diagnostic is mainly to determine whether
    a warranty repair is required for the drive, so the diagnostic
    may not give a lot of useful info about the actual problem.
    Still, the diagnostic is free.

    Everyone has their own favorite way to erase a drive and start
    again. dban.sourceforge.net would be an example of a program
    used to erase drives (select the erasure method carefully, as
    the multipass ones take forever). Spinrite is an example of a
    commercial program, which attempts to repair bad sectors (for
    them to be reallocated or whatever). You could use a Linux LiveCD,
    boot it, and use fdisk to partition the disk, and another tool
    to format a partition.

    So there are a few toys like that you can try out.

    If you simply want to write zeros over the entire surface of
    the drive, in Linux you'd do something like this as root

    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda

    where hda happens to be the name of the drive to be erased.
    Setting a block size on that command, may make it run faster.
    The last time I did one of those, it ran at 13MB/sec.

    There is a port of "dd" available for Windows as well. You
    have to be very careful with tools like this, because you
    could easily wipe out the boot drive by accident. I've even
    used "dd" to "clone" one drive to another (do a sector
    by sector copy, so that the file systems used are irrelevant).
    It is amazing what you can find for free.

    http://www.chrysocome.net/dd

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 6, 2009
    #2
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  3. F Murtz

    F Murtz Guest

    Paul wrote:
    > F Murtz wrote:
    >> I have a drive. XP said it was RAW I formatted it with xp .The format
    >> went to 90% or so then xp said it can not complete format. Now the
    >> drive is not recognised. it does not exist. How can I find it again?

    >
    > Many manufacturers offer a diagnostic program on their web site,
    > available for download. Run the diagnostic and see if the drive
    > reports an error. You would use a Seagate diagnostic for a
    > Seagate drive. The diagnostic is mainly to determine whether
    > a warranty repair is required for the drive, so the diagnostic
    > may not give a lot of useful info about the actual problem.
    > Still, the diagnostic is free.
    >
    > Everyone has their own favorite way to erase a drive and start
    > again. dban.sourceforge.net would be an example of a program
    > used to erase drives (select the erasure method carefully, as
    > the multipass ones take forever). Spinrite is an example of a
    > commercial program, which attempts to repair bad sectors (for
    > them to be reallocated or whatever). You could use a Linux LiveCD,
    > boot it, and use fdisk to partition the disk, and another tool
    > to format a partition.
    >
    > So there are a few toys like that you can try out.
    >
    > If you simply want to write zeros over the entire surface of
    > the drive, in Linux you'd do something like this as root
    >
    > dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda
    >
    > where hda happens to be the name of the drive to be erased.
    > Setting a block size on that command, may make it run faster.
    > The last time I did one of those, it ran at 13MB/sec.
    >
    > There is a port of "dd" available for Windows as well. You
    > have to be very careful with tools like this, because you
    > could easily wipe out the boot drive by accident. I've even
    > used "dd" to "clone" one drive to another (do a sector
    > by sector copy, so that the file systems used are irrelevant).
    > It is amazing what you can find for free.
    >
    > http://www.chrysocome.net/dd
    >
    > Paul

    I tried seagate disk wizard And it does not acknowledge it,s existence.
     
    F Murtz, Jan 6, 2009
    #3
  4. F Murtz

    Paul Guest

    F Murtz wrote:
    > Paul wrote:
    >> F Murtz wrote:
    >>> I have a drive. XP said it was RAW I formatted it with xp .The format
    >>> went to 90% or so then xp said it can not complete format. Now the
    >>> drive is not recognised. it does not exist. How can I find it again?

    >>
    >> Many manufacturers offer a diagnostic program on their web site,
    >> available for download. Run the diagnostic and see if the drive
    >> reports an error. You would use a Seagate diagnostic for a
    >> Seagate drive. The diagnostic is mainly to determine whether
    >> a warranty repair is required for the drive, so the diagnostic
    >> may not give a lot of useful info about the actual problem.
    >> Still, the diagnostic is free.
    >>
    >> Everyone has their own favorite way to erase a drive and start
    >> again. dban.sourceforge.net would be an example of a program
    >> used to erase drives (select the erasure method carefully, as
    >> the multipass ones take forever). Spinrite is an example of a
    >> commercial program, which attempts to repair bad sectors (for
    >> them to be reallocated or whatever). You could use a Linux LiveCD,
    >> boot it, and use fdisk to partition the disk, and another tool
    >> to format a partition.
    >>
    >> So there are a few toys like that you can try out.
    >>
    >> If you simply want to write zeros over the entire surface of
    >> the drive, in Linux you'd do something like this as root
    >>
    >> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda
    >>
    >> where hda happens to be the name of the drive to be erased.
    >> Setting a block size on that command, may make it run faster.
    >> The last time I did one of those, it ran at 13MB/sec.
    >>
    >> There is a port of "dd" available for Windows as well. You
    >> have to be very careful with tools like this, because you
    >> could easily wipe out the boot drive by accident. I've even
    >> used "dd" to "clone" one drive to another (do a sector
    >> by sector copy, so that the file systems used are irrelevant).
    >> It is amazing what you can find for free.
    >>
    >> http://www.chrysocome.net/dd
    >>
    >> Paul

    > I tried seagate disk wizard And it does not acknowledge it,s existence.


    If you cannot see it, even in the BIOS, then it has gone to "drive heaven".
    If the BIOS cannot see it, it isn't likely to work in the OS either.
    (The name should show up in the BIOS page for drives. Getting
    the name right, involves the transfer of only a tiny amount of
    info, so is the easiest test a drive can pass.)

    You should power everything down, and check the cables, before
    continuing. First generation SATA connector design wasn't the best. If
    it is a temporary problem, power cycling might fix it. I had my
    SATA disk "disappear" in Linux yesterday, and pressing reset
    did not recover it - I had to power cycle before everything
    returned to normal.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 6, 2009
    #4
  5. F Murtz

    F Murtz Guest

    Paul wrote:
    > F Murtz wrote:
    >> Paul wrote:
    >>> F Murtz wrote:
    >>>> I have a drive. XP said it was RAW I formatted it with xp .The
    >>>> format went to 90% or so then xp said it can not complete format.
    >>>> Now the drive is not recognised. it does not exist. How can I find
    >>>> it again?
    >>>
    >>> Many manufacturers offer a diagnostic program on their web site,
    >>> available for download. Run the diagnostic and see if the drive
    >>> reports an error. You would use a Seagate diagnostic for a
    >>> Seagate drive. The diagnostic is mainly to determine whether
    >>> a warranty repair is required for the drive, so the diagnostic
    >>> may not give a lot of useful info about the actual problem.
    >>> Still, the diagnostic is free.
    >>>
    >>> Everyone has their own favorite way to erase a drive and start
    >>> again. dban.sourceforge.net would be an example of a program
    >>> used to erase drives (select the erasure method carefully, as
    >>> the multipass ones take forever). Spinrite is an example of a
    >>> commercial program, which attempts to repair bad sectors (for
    >>> them to be reallocated or whatever). You could use a Linux LiveCD,
    >>> boot it, and use fdisk to partition the disk, and another tool
    >>> to format a partition.
    >>>
    >>> So there are a few toys like that you can try out.
    >>>
    >>> If you simply want to write zeros over the entire surface of
    >>> the drive, in Linux you'd do something like this as root
    >>>
    >>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda
    >>>
    >>> where hda happens to be the name of the drive to be erased.
    >>> Setting a block size on that command, may make it run faster.
    >>> The last time I did one of those, it ran at 13MB/sec.
    >>>
    >>> There is a port of "dd" available for Windows as well. You
    >>> have to be very careful with tools like this, because you
    >>> could easily wipe out the boot drive by accident. I've even
    >>> used "dd" to "clone" one drive to another (do a sector
    >>> by sector copy, so that the file systems used are irrelevant).
    >>> It is amazing what you can find for free.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.chrysocome.net/dd
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >> I tried seagate disk wizard And it does not acknowledge it,s existence.

    >
    > If you cannot see it, even in the BIOS, then it has gone to "drive heaven".
    > If the BIOS cannot see it, it isn't likely to work in the OS either.
    > (The name should show up in the BIOS page for drives. Getting
    > the name right, involves the transfer of only a tiny amount of
    > info, so is the easiest test a drive can pass.)
    >
    > You should power everything down, and check the cables, before
    > continuing. First generation SATA connector design wasn't the best. If
    > it is a temporary problem, power cycling might fix it. I had my
    > SATA disk "disappear" in Linux yesterday, and pressing reset
    > did not recover it - I had to power cycle before everything
    > returned to normal.
    >
    > Paul

    Thanks I will try again to night
     
    F Murtz, Jan 6, 2009
    #5
  6. F Murtz

    F Murtz Guest

    Paul wrote:
    > F Murtz wrote:
    >> Paul wrote:
    >>> F Murtz wrote:
    >>>> I have a drive. XP said it was RAW I formatted it with xp .The
    >>>> format went to 90% or so then xp said it can not complete format.
    >>>> Now the drive is not recognised. it does not exist. How can I find
    >>>> it again?
    >>>
    >>> Many manufacturers offer a diagnostic program on their web site,
    >>> available for download. Run the diagnostic and see if the drive
    >>> reports an error. You would use a Seagate diagnostic for a
    >>> Seagate drive. The diagnostic is mainly to determine whether
    >>> a warranty repair is required for the drive, so the diagnostic
    >>> may not give a lot of useful info about the actual problem.
    >>> Still, the diagnostic is free.
    >>>
    >>> Everyone has their own favorite way to erase a drive and start
    >>> again. dban.sourceforge.net would be an example of a program
    >>> used to erase drives (select the erasure method carefully, as
    >>> the multipass ones take forever). Spinrite is an example of a
    >>> commercial program, which attempts to repair bad sectors (for
    >>> them to be reallocated or whatever). You could use a Linux LiveCD,
    >>> boot it, and use fdisk to partition the disk, and another tool
    >>> to format a partition.
    >>>
    >>> So there are a few toys like that you can try out.
    >>>
    >>> If you simply want to write zeros over the entire surface of
    >>> the drive, in Linux you'd do something like this as root
    >>>
    >>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda
    >>>
    >>> where hda happens to be the name of the drive to be erased.
    >>> Setting a block size on that command, may make it run faster.
    >>> The last time I did one of those, it ran at 13MB/sec.
    >>>
    >>> There is a port of "dd" available for Windows as well. You
    >>> have to be very careful with tools like this, because you
    >>> could easily wipe out the boot drive by accident. I've even
    >>> used "dd" to "clone" one drive to another (do a sector
    >>> by sector copy, so that the file systems used are irrelevant).
    >>> It is amazing what you can find for free.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.chrysocome.net/dd
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >> I tried seagate disk wizard And it does not acknowledge it,s existence.

    >
    > If you cannot see it, even in the BIOS, then it has gone to "drive heaven".
    > If the BIOS cannot see it, it isn't likely to work in the OS either.
    > (The name should show up in the BIOS page for drives. Getting
    > the name right, involves the transfer of only a tiny amount of
    > info, so is the easiest test a drive can pass.)
    >
    > You should power everything down, and check the cables, before
    > continuing. First generation SATA connector design wasn't the best. If
    > it is a temporary problem, power cycling might fix it. I had my
    > SATA disk "disappear" in Linux yesterday, and pressing reset
    > did not recover it - I had to power cycle before everything
    > returned to normal.
    >
    > Paul

    It is back xp would not see it but I got it back with some dos seagate
    software
     
    F Murtz, Jan 6, 2009
    #6
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