Samsung DVD reader/CD Reader/writer SM-352

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Yeah Right, Feb 7, 2008.

  1. Yeah Right

    Yeah Right Guest

    I've got a Samsung SM-352 DVD reader on one of my computers that
    I find quite useful to watch my Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons
    DVD's on in my workshop. It used to play all zones but just
    recently refused to play anything apart from Zone 4.
    What can I do to set it to all zone?
     
    Yeah Right, Feb 7, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In article <>, Yeah Right did
    write:

    > It used to play all zones but just recently refused to play anything apart
    > from Zone 4. What can I do to set it to all zone?


    With officially-sanctioned players, this is not possible without
    unauthorized firmware hacks.

    Have you tried a different player, like VLC?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 7, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Yeah Right

    Richard Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In article <>, Yeah Right did
    > write:
    >
    >> It used to play all zones but just recently refused to play anything apart
    >> from Zone 4. What can I do to set it to all zone?

    >
    > With officially-sanctioned players, this is not possible without
    > unauthorized firmware hacks.
    >
    > Have you tried a different player, like VLC?


    Yeah, but remember the aussie competition watchdog ruled them as bad,
    what was the outcome of that with the protection on the hardware drives.

    It doesnt seem to bother dvdfab decrypter so I have never even set it on
    my drive here.
     
    Richard, Feb 7, 2008
    #3
  4. Yeah Right

    Yeah Right Guest

    On , , Thu, 07 Feb 2008 23:27:16 +1300, Re: Samsung DVD reader/CD
    Reader/writer SM-352, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >In article <>, Yeah Right did
    >write:
    >
    >> It used to play all zones but just recently refused to play anything apart
    >> from Zone 4. What can I do to set it to all zone?

    >
    >With officially-sanctioned players, this is not possible without
    >unauthorized firmware hacks.


    I found some firmware hacks but it does warn that they can go
    wrong and ruin your drive.
    It's just that my Captain Scarlet DVD's are region 2 and the damn
    player only plays region 4. I'm using Power DVD 5 if that makes
    any difference. I had a damn good look at the program but
    couldn't see anything obvious. It must be of a lower level than
    that.

    >Have you tried a different player, like VLC?


    No, I'll look for it.
     
    Yeah Right, Feb 7, 2008
    #4
  5. Yeah Right

    SlowLearner Guest

    On Feb 8, 12:35 am, Yeah Right <>
    wrote:
    > On , , Thu, 07 Feb 2008 23:27:16 +1300, Re: Samsung DVD reader/CD
    > Reader/writer SM-352, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    >
    > <_zealand> wrote:
    > >In article <>, Yeah Right did
    > >write:

    >
    > >> It used to play all zones but just recently refused to play anything apart
    > >> from Zone 4. What can I do to set it to all zone?

    >
    > >With officially-sanctioned players, this is not possible without
    > >unauthorized firmware hacks.

    >
    > I found some firmware hacks but it does warn that they can go
    > wrong and ruin your drive.
    > It's just that my Captain Scarlet DVD's are region 2 and the damn
    > player only plays region 4. I'm using Power DVD 5 if that makes
    > any difference. I had a damn good look at the program but
    > couldn't see anything obvious. It must be of a lower level than
    > that.
    >
    > >Have you tried a different player, like VLC?

    >
    > No, I'll look for it.


    I hope I can help since I have been royally screwed over in a similar
    manner. What is below is my laymans understanding of the situation
    which boils down to the fact that the various copyright consortiums
    actaully want to increase the level of piracy of DVDs.

    WHAT HAPPENED TO ME
    My DVD drive in my HP/Compaq laptop somehow got set to zone 2. I am
    sure I didn't do it (It happened about the same time I used the
    restore DVDs I created and I think *it* did it). Previous to that it
    would play almost any DVD I owned (I have zone 4 and a pile of zone 1s
    from when I spent some time in the US) or at least let me rip them to
    the drive to watch from there.

    Now that it is set to zone 2 I can't watch any of my DVDs until I set
    it to either 1 or 4. Having had a long conversation with HP, now that
    it is set to a zone I am ker-fecked. It will now forever be 'zoned'.

    BUT YOU CAN CHANGE THE ZONE YOU SAY?
    Yes, you can. 5 times. After that its locked to the last option,
    permenantly (some drives have a "tech" setting that allows one or two
    more changes before FINAL lock in). So the drive manufacturer will
    kindly allow me to watch each half of my DVD collection 5 times before
    making me chose one half to live with.

    BUT WHAT ABOUT <insert FAVOURED SOFTWARE CIRUMVENTION HERE>?
    I am still fecked. In the past region code was enforced by the
    software. The drive simply trusted the software to inhbit the viewing
    of legally purchased copies of DVDs when thet were played on a legally
    purchased DVD drive that happened to have the wrong zone. These happy
    days were called "RPC-1". Now the various mentally retarded copyright
    consortiums decided to heavy in on the manufactures of DVD drives.
    Technically, to use the DVD technology you now need to implement RPC2.
    RPC2 enforces the zone at the drive level and only allows a certain
    number of changes to the zone in the firmware of the drive. Wrong
    zone, DVD no play.

    BUT WHAT ABOUT FIRMWARE HACKS?
    Good question. RPC2 also mandates some kind of encryption on the
    firmware. This means that until the firmware is broken the kind and
    talented people on the internet who can write/edit the firmware to
    make it RPC1 again are stuck. For some people (possibly yourself
    included) this is doable as not every company *exactly* follows the
    RPC2 spec. As a result once one firmware from a manufacturer has been
    cracked it it easy to crack others or they just don't bother
    encrypting it in the first place. I am however still fecked. The
    manufacturer of my DVD is Matsushita (aka MatsuSHITa), utimately owned
    by Panasonic. They have apparently used a seperate encryption key on
    each drive model. This means it is not really worth anyones time
    cracking it as it will only apply to a limited number of drives. The
    effort:payoff is not worth it.

    WHAT CAN I DO?
    Well, stuff all really. I emailed the Ministry of Consumer Affairs
    last year and have had no reply. My only suggestion is to only buy
    pirated DVDs or download movies from the internet. The pirated movies
    contain no zoning so will be compatible with any DVD player and as an
    extra bonus FBI warnings, adverts and "splash" screen you can't FF
    through are not included, all for a lower price. I used to buy about a
    DVD a month but since I hit this problem last year I have bought zero
    DVDs, it's not going to bring down the industry but f*ked if I am
    lining the pockets of people who think I am a criminal because I, god
    forbid, purchased DVDs while overseas.

    Interestingly the ACCC (Australian Commerce ... something else with
    C ... Commission ... ) took a case a while ago against the media
    people becasue they believed that DVD zoning was really just a price
    fixing mechanism. No idea how that turned out as I can find references
    but nothing that catergorically states what the result was.

    For DVD firmware you can have a look at www.rpc1.org it might fix your
    problem. Until then, all you can do is check the model of the DVD
    drive in your new purchase before buying it. I had no idea about RPC2
    and the problems it would cause.

    HP have washed thier hands of the problem, apparently great "features"
    like this are what great companies are built on. Bond and Bond (the
    retailer where we bought the laptop) similarily believe that this is a
    manufacting "feature" and therefore not thier problem either.

    I contacted Citizens Advice but they had no idea what I am talking
    about. I emailed the Consumers Institute and said I would happily join
    if they could help me and I was basically told that I would need to
    join to ask questions and as noted previously I have contacted the
    Ministry of Consumer Affairs and obviously as a simple taxpayer I am
    not important enough.

    Not sure what I am going to do to fix my dud drive. But when I get the
    enthusiam again I'll go at least one more round with the powers that
    be and see if I can get it resolved.

    So to summarise:
    1. have a look at www.RPC1.org, they might be able to help.
    2. Never buy from Bond and Bond
    3. Never buy HP products
    4. Don't bother contacting anyone because no one either understands or
    cares.
    4a. Pay as little tax as possible, it really is just wasted.
    5. Support your local movie pirates, better quality products at
    knockdown prices.
     
    SlowLearner, Feb 8, 2008
    #5
  6. Yeah Right

    Richard Guest

    SlowLearner wrote:
    > So to summarise:
    > 1. have a look at www.RPC1.org, they might be able to help.
    > 2. Never buy from Bond and Bond
    > 3. Never buy HP products
    > 4. Don't bother contacting anyone because no one either understands or
    > cares.
    > 4a. Pay as little tax as possible, it really is just wasted.
    > 5. Support your local movie pirates, better quality products at
    > knockdown prices.


    What about if you install software like dvd region-x or rip the movies
    with dvdfab decrypter?
     
    Richard, Feb 8, 2008
    #6
  7. In article <1202442016.451438@ftpsrv1>, Richard did write:

    > What about if you install software like dvd region-x or rip the movies
    > with dvdfab decrypter?


    Violates laws against circumventing copy-protection mechanisms.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 8, 2008
    #7
  8. Yeah Right

    Richard Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In article <1202442016.451438@ftpsrv1>, Richard did write:
    >
    >> What about if you install software like dvd region-x or rip the movies
    >> with dvdfab decrypter?

    >
    > Violates laws against circumventing copy-protection mechanisms.


    So what? Has anyone being charged with using these products despite
    their use being well known?
     
    Richard, Feb 8, 2008
    #8
  9. In article <1202447713.921612@ftpsrv1>, Richard did write:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> In article <1202442016.451438@ftpsrv1>, Richard did write:
    >>
    >>> What about if you install software like dvd region-x or rip the movies
    >>> with dvdfab decrypter?

    >>
    >> Violates laws against circumventing copy-protection mechanisms.

    >
    > So what? Has anyone being charged with using these products despite
    > their use being well known?


    <http://dvd-copy.blogspot.com/2005/08/brief-history-of-dvd-copying-part-3.html>
    <http://www.wired.com/entertainment/music/news/2004/08/64453>
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 8, 2008
    #9
  10. Yeah Right

    Guest

    On Thu, 07 Feb 2008 21:33:22 +1300, Yeah Right <> wrote:

    >I've got a Samsung SM-352 DVD reader on one of my computers that
    >I find quite useful to watch my Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons
    >DVD's on in my workshop. It used to play all zones but just
    >recently refused to play anything apart from Zone 4.
    >What can I do to set it to all zone?




    Find a Firmware Patch for it..
     
    , Feb 8, 2008
    #10
  11. Yeah Right

    Lodi Guest

    On Thu, 07 Feb 2008 16:13:40 -0800, SlowLearner wrote:
    >
    > I hope I can help since I have been royally screwed over in a similar
    > manner. What is below is my laymans understanding of the situation which
    > boils down to the fact that the various copyright consortiums actaully
    > want to increase the level of piracy of DVDs.
    >
    > WHAT HAPPENED TO ME
    > My DVD drive in my HP/Compaq laptop somehow got set to zone 2. I am sure
    > I didn't do it (It happened about the same time I used the restore DVDs
    > I created and I think *it* did it). Previous to that it would play
    > almost any DVD I owned (I have zone 4 and a pile of zone 1s from when I
    > spent some time in the US) or at least let me rip them to the drive to
    > watch from there.
    >
    > Now that it is set to zone 2 I can't watch any of my DVDs until I set it
    > to either 1 or 4. Having had a long conversation with HP, now that it is
    > set to a zone I am ker-fecked. It will now forever be 'zoned'.
    >
    > BUT YOU CAN CHANGE THE ZONE YOU SAY?
    > Yes, you can. 5 times. After that its locked to the last option,
    > permenantly (some drives have a "tech" setting that allows one or two
    > more changes before FINAL lock in). So the drive manufacturer will
    > kindly allow me to watch each half of my DVD collection 5 times before
    > making me chose one half to live with.
    >
    > BUT WHAT ABOUT <insert FAVOURED SOFTWARE CIRUMVENTION HERE>? I am still
    > fecked. In the past region code was enforced by the software. The drive
    > simply trusted the software to inhbit the viewing of legally purchased
    > copies of DVDs when thet were played on a legally purchased DVD drive
    > that happened to have the wrong zone. These happy days were called
    > "RPC-1". Now the various mentally retarded copyright consortiums decided
    > to heavy in on the manufactures of DVD drives. Technically, to use the
    > DVD technology you now need to implement RPC2. RPC2 enforces the zone at
    > the drive level and only allows a certain number of changes to the zone
    > in the firmware of the drive. Wrong zone, DVD no play.
    >
    > BUT WHAT ABOUT FIRMWARE HACKS?
    > Good question. RPC2 also mandates some kind of encryption on the
    > firmware. This means that until the firmware is broken the kind and
    > talented people on the internet who can write/edit the firmware to make
    > it RPC1 again are stuck. For some people (possibly yourself included)
    > this is doable as not every company *exactly* follows the RPC2 spec. As
    > a result once one firmware from a manufacturer has been cracked it it
    > easy to crack others or they just don't bother encrypting it in the
    > first place. I am however still fecked. The manufacturer of my DVD is
    > Matsushita (aka MatsuSHITa), utimately owned by Panasonic. They have
    > apparently used a seperate encryption key on each drive model. This
    > means it is not really worth anyones time cracking it as it will only
    > apply to a limited number of drives. The effort:payoff is not worth it.
    >
    > WHAT CAN I DO?
    > Well, stuff all really. I emailed the Ministry of Consumer Affairs last
    > year and have had no reply. My only suggestion is to only buy pirated
    > DVDs or download movies from the internet. The pirated movies contain no
    > zoning so will be compatible with any DVD player and as an extra bonus
    > FBI warnings, adverts and "splash" screen you can't FF through are not
    > included, all for a lower price. I used to buy about a DVD a month but
    > since I hit this problem last year I have bought zero DVDs, it's not
    > going to bring down the industry but f*ked if I am lining the pockets of
    > people who think I am a criminal because I, god forbid, purchased DVDs
    > while overseas.
    >
    > Interestingly the ACCC (Australian Commerce ... something else with C
    > ... Commission ... ) took a case a while ago against the media people
    > becasue they believed that DVD zoning was really just a price fixing
    > mechanism. No idea how that turned out as I can find references but
    > nothing that catergorically states what the result was.
    >
    > For DVD firmware you can have a look at www.rpc1.org it might fix your
    > problem. Until then, all you can do is check the model of the DVD drive
    > in your new purchase before buying it. I had no idea about RPC2 and the
    > problems it would cause.
    >
    > HP have washed thier hands of the problem, apparently great "features"
    > like this are what great companies are built on. Bond and Bond (the
    > retailer where we bought the laptop) similarily believe that this is a
    > manufacting "feature" and therefore not thier problem either.
    >
    > I contacted Citizens Advice but they had no idea what I am talking
    > about. I emailed the Consumers Institute and said I would happily join
    > if they could help me and I was basically told that I would need to join
    > to ask questions and as noted previously I have contacted the Ministry
    > of Consumer Affairs and obviously as a simple taxpayer I am not
    > important enough.
    >
    > Not sure what I am going to do to fix my dud drive. But when I get the
    > enthusiam again I'll go at least one more round with the powers that be
    > and see if I can get it resolved.
    >
    > So to summarise:
    > 1. have a look at www.RPC1.org, they might be able to help. 2. Never buy
    > from Bond and Bond
    > 3. Never buy HP products
    > 4. Don't bother contacting anyone because no one either understands or
    > cares.
    > 4a. Pay as little tax as possible, it really is just wasted. 5. Support
    > your local movie pirates, better quality products at knockdown prices.


    Excellent post SL. I had the same rude introduction to Matsushita DVD
    units last year-ish when asked to do a region re-set for a friends
    laptop. There is no work-around, hardware or software.

    I eventually ended up swapping the Matsushita DVD player with the DVD
    player in my own laptop (can't remember the make/model). Fortunately for
    my friend I never watch DVD's on my laptop so it was no loss to me.

    I'm currently looking for a new laptop for another friend and knowing the
    make/model of the DVD unit is a priority. No rpc2 firmware fix = no
    purchase. Once bitten twice shy.

    Regards
    Lodi
     
    Lodi, Feb 8, 2008
    #11
  12. In article <foh2d8$a4c$>, Lodi did write:

    > I'm currently looking for a new laptop for another friend and knowing the
    > make/model of the DVD unit is a priority. No rpc2 firmware fix = no
    > purchase.


    Unfortunately the DVD drive makers are contractually bound not to offer that
    kind of thing.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 8, 2008
    #12
  13. Yeah Right

    Lodi Guest

    On Fri, 08 Feb 2008 21:06:23 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > In article <foh2d8$a4c$>, Lodi did write:
    >
    >> I'm currently looking for a new laptop for another friend and knowing
    >> the make/model of the DVD unit is a priority. No rpc2 firmware fix = no
    >> purchase.

    >
    > Unfortunately the DVD drive makers are contractually bound not to offer
    > that kind of thing.


    Perhaps I should have said

    "No rpc2 firmware fix at....

    http://forum.rpc1.org/index.php

    ..... = no purchase"

    Lodi
     
    Lodi, Feb 8, 2008
    #13
  14. Yeah Right

    Richard Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > <http://dvd-copy.blogspot.com/2005/08/brief-history-of-dvd-copying-part-3.html>
    > <http://www.wired.com/entertainment/music/news/2004/08/64453>


    yes, so making and distributing the code is illegal in the united states.

    Can you find any cases where anything has happened to an individual who
    has used it for personal use?
     
    Richard, Feb 8, 2008
    #14
  15. Yeah Right

    Richard Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In article <foh2d8$a4c$>, Lodi did write:
    >
    >> I'm currently looking for a new laptop for another friend and knowing the
    >> make/model of the DVD unit is a priority. No rpc2 firmware fix = no
    >> purchase.

    >
    > Unfortunately the DVD drive makers are contractually bound not to offer that
    > kind of thing.


    Yes, but they are also bound by NZ law which has fit for purpose clauses
    in the consumers guarantees act.

    If I actually cared enough about region protected movies I would look
    into it, but thankfully its not an issue where I watch my movies ;)
     
    Richard, Feb 8, 2008
    #15
  16. Yeah Right

    SlowLearner Guest

    On Feb 8, 9:29 pm, Richard <> wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > > In article <foh2d8$>, Lodi did write:

    >
    > >> I'm currently looking for a new laptop for another friend and knowing the
    > >> make/model of the DVD unit is a priority. No rpc2 firmware fix = no
    > >> purchase.

    >
    > > Unfortunately the DVD drive makers are contractually bound not to offer that
    > > kind of thing.

    >
    > Yes, but they are also bound by NZ law which has fit for purpose clauses
    > in the consumers guarantees act.
    >
    > If I actually cared enough about region protected movies I would look
    > into it, but thankfully its not an issue where I watch my movies ;)


    Hi Richard, the whole "fit for a purpose" thing is what I was going to
    base "round 2" on. But before I did that I wanted to check where I
    stood, IANAL etc. Sadly, I have not had much luck (as per my post).
    Once I find a little free time I am going to join Consumer for three
    months and see what they say about it then have another go. As far as
    I am concerned this drive is defective as it is unable to play DVDs
    with the "DVD" logo on it.

    With respect to the software, I have tried a number of them. DVD
    Decryptors website even has a specific note that Matsushita drives
    can't be circumvented (its on a footnote).

    Lodi, funnily enough since I have been ranting about this with various
    people I know I have heard of a few stories about people who made all
    the changes, got locked out and ended up buying new drives, nice
    little money spinner for the drive makers. The problem is that I
    guess, like myself, not many people are aware that this new RPC2
    exists. I was under the impression that DVD drives could all be
    multizoned.

    At the end of the day, like all DRM, the ONLY people this hurts are
    legitimate purchasers. If I was a DVD pirate what would I care? I'd
    have a 20 DVD burner rack anyway, I can just set each drive to a new
    zone, rip a copy and away I go.

    I am thinking that I need to get a bigger HD and rip ALL my Zone 1
    DVDs to the HD while I can because lets face it, this situation is
    only going to get worse and I'd hate to get a new computer a few years
    down the track which is locked to zone4 only and can never be changed
    or won't play my old DVDs because it can't find some magic DRM marker
    on it.
     
    SlowLearner, Feb 8, 2008
    #16
  17. In article <1202458983.491388@ftpsrv1>, Richard did write:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In article <foh2d8$a4c$>, Lodi did write:
    >>
    >>> I'm currently looking for a new laptop for another friend and knowing
    >>> the make/model of the DVD unit is a priority. No rpc2 firmware fix = no
    >>> purchase.

    >>
    >> Unfortunately the DVD drive makers are contractually bound not to offer
    >> that kind of thing.

    >
    > Yes, but they are also bound by NZ law which has fit for purpose clauses
    > in the consumers guarantees act.


    Caught between US patent and DMCA law on one side, and NZ consumer law on
    the other.

    Very hard to decide which one will prevail, isn't it...
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 8, 2008
    #17
  18. In article <1202458831.493081@ftpsrv1>, Richard did write:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >>

    <http://dvd-copy.blogspot.com/2005/08/brief-history-of-dvd-copying-part-3.html>
    >> <http://www.wired.com/entertainment/music/news/2004/08/64453>

    >
    > yes, so making and distributing the code is illegal in the united states.
    >
    > Can you find any cases where anything has happened to an individual who
    > has used it for personal use?


    <http://www.eff.org/wp/unintended-consequences-seven-years-under-dmca>
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 8, 2008
    #18
  19. Yeah Right

    Richard Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    >> Can you find any cases where anything has happened to an individual who
    >> has used it for personal use?

    >
    > <http://www.eff.org/wp/unintended-consequences-seven-years-under-dmca>


    How is a page on EFF's complaints about the DMCA relevent to the topic
    at hand, which is an NZ resident wanting to play legally imported
    foreign DVD's on a locally purchased computer that claims it will play
    DVD's. US-DMCA isn't relevent, NZ law is.

    Its the norm that hardware players are region free in NZ and Australia.
    If the PC makers are going to deviate from the norm they need to
    properly inform customers pre-purchase that the DVD drive in the
    computer is not fit for use in NZ where the norm is to have no such
     
    Richard, Feb 8, 2008
    #19
  20. Yeah Right

    Nighthawk Guest

    On Fri, 08 Feb 2008 18:19:09 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >In article <1202442016.451438@ftpsrv1>, Richard did write:
    >
    >> What about if you install software like dvd region-x or rip the movies
    >> with dvdfab decrypter?

    >
    >Violates laws against circumventing copy-protection mechanisms.


    I don't think I have ever come across anyone so strongly on the side
    of the 'law', acting like a watchdog for the authorities, (though I
    don't believe there is actually a connection) even when it screws us
    over, whether it be improving/tweaking Windows or trying to get around
    the ridiculous region system for DVDs that does us in Region 4 NO
    FAVOURS.

    Amongst my DVD collection, all bought locally, apart from Region 4, I
    also have Region 1 & 2 DVDs.

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro must have a serious problem with all the
    region-free DVD players one can buy in any appliance shop.
     
    Nighthawk, Feb 8, 2008
    #20
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