s/w for HD audio info? was: Why OTA HD... "gone"

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by willbill, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. willbill

    willbill Guest

    Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

    > See this editorial:
    >
    > http://www.audioholics.com/news/editorials/DumbingDownAudio.php



    nice ref, thank you. :)
    (i mean, the www.audioholics.com part)

    this is a very long post, so my main
    question is: do you, or anyone else, know of any
    pc s/w (freeware or commercial) that gives detailed
    info on the 5.1 DD and/or DTS audio encoding on
    recent DVD movies?

    i'll repeat this question way below

    fwiw, i did read the editorial (above) but think
    that you are misrepresenting it

    at the moment, my interest is the 5.1 sound (Dolby
    and DTS) that is on DVD movies, which is a related
    subject (to your thread title), so i changed the title. :)

    i have two decent DVD units on my TV system;
    a Panasonic DMR-ES10 DVD recorder ($180/Costco), and
    a Toshiba SD-K760 player ($50/Costco)

    within www.audioholics.com the ref that is
    most useful to me is:
    www.audioholics.com/techtips/specsformats/dolbydigitaldts.php
    which has the title of:
    "Dolby Digital vs. DTS: A Guide to the Strengths of the Formats,
    dated: Tuesday, August 31 2004; Original Publish Date: August 6, 1999"

    "With the birth of Dolby Surround in movie theaters, it was only
    a matter of time... Enter Dolby's newest creation, Dolby Digital (DD).
    For the first time, a fully discrete digital 5.1 channel surround
    format was created for both the theaters and home audio marketplace.
    When... DVD Working Group (DVDWG) sought the best audio coding
    technology for the new format back in 1995, Dolby Labs jumped at
    the opportunity. Dolby argued that its name recognition, familiarity
    with the movie industry, and the choice of its system for audio coding
    in the new DTV standard made it a logical choice for DVD as well.
    The DVDWG agreed, and DD was selected as 1 of 2 required soundtracks,
    the other being PCM, on all DVD releases in the USA. The DVDWG also
    allowed for DTS and SDDS as optional soundtracks. A year after this
    occurrence, Digital Theater Systems (DTS) joined... claiming its
    coding method sounded better due to higher bit rates and less
    compression. The DVDWG mandated that any DVD carrying a DTS
    soundtrack must also contain one of two of the previously
    mentioned required soundtracks."

    "...DD and DTS utilize lossy data reduction algorithms, which reduce
    the number of bits needed to encode an audio signal. DD compresses
    a 5.1 channel surround track to 384 kbps to 448 kbps

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    (DVD Standard limited, DD has the potential of up to
    640 kbps) while DTS uses much higher bit rates
    up to 1.4 Mbps for CD's / LD's and 1.5 Mbps for DVD.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    A higher bit rate must imply DTS will be superior sounding right?
    In theory, the less compression used in the encoding process,
    the more realistic the sound will be, as it will better represent
    the original source. DD tends to boast that its encoding method
    is more efficient than DTS and thus does not require the extra
    bit rates. However, even if DD is slightly more efficient, it is
    still not 1.5 / .448 = 3.35 times more efficient.. However, both
    DD & DTS will boast data rates, efficiency, etc, but what actually
    translates to better sound is a very ambiguous matter as there are
    more factors involved here that goes beyond the scope of this article."

    "Dolby Digital has "16-20 bit system; Limited to 48KHz sampling."
    while DTS has "16-24 bit system, 48/96 KHz sampling rate (scalable);
    limited 96/24 software available.""

    my Toshiba DVD player manual states on p.26 that
    "Signals of 96kHz from the COAXIAL DIGITAL AUDIO OUT
    jack are depressed to 48kHz by down sampling
    process when a copyright protected disc is played"

    my Panasonic DVD recorder manual states on p.33 that
    "PCM Down Conversion: ...signals are converted to 48/44.1...
    or the disc has copy protection"

    it says nothing about DTS audio possibly being downconverted

    do you, or anyone else, know of any pc s/w (freeware
    or commercial) that gives detailed info on the 5.1
    DD and/or DTS audio encoding on recent DVD movies?

    i.e. whether the sampling rate is 48, or 48/96 (scalable),
    or whatever

    TIA, bill


    > and understand that people want MORE, not better.
    >
    > OTA HD will go away, at least the free kind, and will be replaced by
    > MORE digital channels in the same bandwidth.
    >
    > HD will turn into a premium service, even OTA.
    >
    > Welcome to the digital world, where they CAN do these things.
    willbill, Mar 18, 2006
    #1
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  2. In article <>,
    willbill <> wrote:

    > fwiw, i did read the editorial (above) but think
    > that you are misrepresenting it


    no, I'm not.


    > at the moment, my interest is the 5.1 sound (Dolby
    > and DTS) that is on DVD movies, which is a related
    > subject (to your thread title),


    no, it's not.
    Elmo P. Shagnasty, Mar 19, 2006
    #2
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