S.M.A.R.T. status? What's this?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Erskin, Jul 6, 2004.

  1. Erskin

    Erskin Guest

    The last few days I get a message on startup that says:

    S.M.A.R.T. status BAD. Backup and restore.


    What is that, and what do I do about it?

    Thanks!
    Erskin, Jul 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Erskin

    Thor Guest

    S.M.A.R.T monitoring is a feature of your BIOS, and your harddrive, that
    allows the system to monitor several parameters of harddrive operation. If
    some of those critical parameters go out of tolerance, then you will get a
    warning, such as the one you saw. The idea is to try and predict harddrive
    failure before actual and total failure and data loss occurs. When S.M.A.R.T
    is telling you to back up your data, it's because your drive may well be on
    the verge of failure. I would heed it's advice and back up your data.
    S.M.A.R.T isn't perfect, and can give you a warning that turns out to be
    wrong, but in my experience, it's correct more often than incorrect.



    "Erskin" <> wrote in message
    news:4QCGc.47$-kc.rr.com...
    > The last few days I get a message on startup that says:
    >
    > S.M.A.R.T. status BAD. Backup and restore.
    >
    >
    > What is that, and what do I do about it?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    >
    Thor, Jul 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. My experience is that S.M.A.R.T. failures are more often 'false
    negatives' than false positives. That is, it's more often that the drive
    will fail without a warning message than that you'll get a warning
    message that's incorrect.

    Thor wrote:
    > S.M.A.R.T monitoring is a feature of your BIOS, and your harddrive, that
    > allows the system to monitor several parameters of harddrive operation. If
    > some of those critical parameters go out of tolerance, then you will get a
    > warning, such as the one you saw. The idea is to try and predict harddrive
    > failure before actual and total failure and data loss occurs. When S.M.A.R.T
    > is telling you to back up your data, it's because your drive may well be on
    > the verge of failure. I would heed it's advice and back up your data.
    > S.M.A.R.T isn't perfect, and can give you a warning that turns out to be
    > wrong, but in my experience, it's correct more often than incorrect.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Erskin" <> wrote in message
    > news:4QCGc.47$-kc.rr.com...
    >
    >>The last few days I get a message on startup that says:
    >>
    >>S.M.A.R.T. status BAD. Backup and restore.
    >>
    >>
    >>What is that, and what do I do about it?
    >>
    >>Thanks!
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    Calvin Crumrine, Jul 6, 2004
    #3
  4. Erskin

    Thor Guest

    "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My experience is that S.M.A.R.T. failures are more often 'false
    > negatives' than false positives. That is, it's more often that the drive
    > will fail without a warning message than that you'll get a warning
    > message that's incorrect.


    S.M.A.R.T isn't capable of monitoring every type of harddrive failures, thus
    it is common to see a drive fail without warning. Sometimes, the failure is
    sudden and catastrophic, and even though it might monitor something involved
    in the failure, S.M.A.R.T doesn't necessarily always have an opportunity to
    warn the user before access to the drive is cut off.
    Thor, Jul 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Thor wrote:
    > "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>My experience is that S.M.A.R.T. failures are more often 'false
    >>negatives' than false positives. That is, it's more often that the drive
    >>will fail without a warning message than that you'll get a warning
    >>message that's incorrect.

    >
    >
    > S.M.A.R.T isn't capable of monitoring every type of harddrive failures, thus
    > it is common to see a drive fail without warning. Sometimes, the failure is
    > sudden and catastrophic, and even though it might monitor something involved
    > in the failure, S.M.A.R.T doesn't necessarily always have an opportunity to
    > warn the user before access to the drive is cut off.
    >
    >
    >

    You're right. I should have said 'S.M.A.R.T. drive failures' as the
    failure (probably) wasn't in S.M.A.R.T. itself. I guess what I was
    trying to say is that while you're right that one should pay attention
    to an S.M.A.R.T. warning of an impending drive failure, one should not
    rely on S.M.A.R.T. to provide that warning. As you point out, many
    failures are either of the type S.M.A.R.T. doesn't monitor or occur too
    quickly for the warning to be displayed (or acted upon).
    Calvin Crumrine, Jul 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Erskin

    Thor Guest

    "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thor wrote:
    > > "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >
    > >>My experience is that S.M.A.R.T. failures are more often 'false
    > >>negatives' than false positives. That is, it's more often that the drive
    > >>will fail without a warning message than that you'll get a warning
    > >>message that's incorrect.

    > >
    > >
    > > S.M.A.R.T isn't capable of monitoring every type of harddrive failures,

    thus
    > > it is common to see a drive fail without warning. Sometimes, the failure

    is
    > > sudden and catastrophic, and even though it might monitor something

    involved
    > > in the failure, S.M.A.R.T doesn't necessarily always have an opportunity

    to
    > > warn the user before access to the drive is cut off.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > You're right. I should have said 'S.M.A.R.T. drive failures' as the
    > failure (probably) wasn't in S.M.A.R.T. itself. I guess what I was
    > trying to say is that while you're right that one should pay attention
    > to an S.M.A.R.T. warning of an impending drive failure, one should not
    > rely on S.M.A.R.T. to provide that warning. As you point out, many
    > failures are either of the type S.M.A.R.T. doesn't monitor or occur too
    > quickly for the warning to be displayed (or acted upon).


    one feature of S.M.A.R.T that is worth checking from time to time is the
    reallocated sector count. Periodic checking with a windows-based S.M.A.R.T
    monitoring tool can reveal growing numbers of bad sectors long before they
    reach the point of initiating a warning via the BIOS.
    Thor, Jul 7, 2004
    #6
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