Russian School Principal and Microsoft

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by peterwn, Feb 9, 2007.

  1. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    See:
    http://www.ospint.com/text/d/3935414/

    This is a fairly significant backtrack by Microsoft.

    However MS said: "In this particular case, it's important to point out
    that Microsoft did not instigate the prosecution against Mr. Ponosov".

    However, Microsoft earlier seemed to have no 'problem' with a "A man
    who has devoted his life to teaching and bringing up children [being]
    sentenced to imprisonment in one of the Siberian jails". In other
    words, Microsoft threw its full weight behind the actions of the
    Russian police (regardless of who or what triggered the investigation)
    until it started to feel a public backlash and the school system in
    quetion resolved to promote Linux.

    On a simlar note, an article appeared in the "Boston Globe" last year
    questioning the expenses claims of a public IT official just at the
    time he was promoting open office formats, something that was very
    worrying to Microsoft. He was totally exonerated but still chose to
    resign - who could blame him? A bit much of a coincidence considering
    that Microsoft was actively lobbying state politicians concerning file
    formats.

    Normally, any police service (even one as convoluted as the Russian
    one) would aim its investigation at the suppliers of dubious goods &
    services rather than a consumer. Perhaps the principal got up
    someone's nose. It could not be the education authority, judging by
    its response to go Linux. Perhaps there was another problem, like the
    education authority refusing to buy a flat rate Windows / Office
    licence as some school systems buy (like the New Zealand Eduction
    Ministry at about $US1 per head of population), and an example needed
    to be made of someone to coerce the authority to fall into line.

    Teachers around the globe must surely be concerned when one of their
    innocent colleagues risks being dispatched to the Gualg, and Microsoft
    happily condones such action at least initially.


    Who knows?
     
    peterwn, Feb 9, 2007
    #1
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  2. __/ [ peterwn ] on Friday 09 February 2007 23:05 \__

    > See:
    > http://www.ospint.com/text/d/3935414/
    >
    > This is a fairly significant backtrack by Microsoft.
    >
    > However MS said: "In this particular case, it's important to point out
    > that Microsoft did not instigate the prosecution against Mr. Ponosov".
    >
    > However, Microsoft earlier seemed to have no 'problem' with a "A man
    > who has devoted his life to teaching and bringing up children [being]
    > sentenced to imprisonment in one of the Siberian jails". In other
    > words, Microsoft threw its full weight behind the actions of the
    > Russian police (regardless of who or what triggered the investigation)
    > until it started to feel a public backlash and the school system in
    > quetion resolved to promote Linux.
    >
    > On a simlar note, an article appeared in the "Boston Globe" last year
    > questioning the expenses claims of a public IT official just at the
    > time he was promoting open office formats, something that was very
    > worrying to Microsoft. He was totally exonerated but still chose to
    > resign - who could blame him? A bit much of a coincidence considering
    > that Microsoft was actively lobbying state politicians concerning file
    > formats.
    >
    > Normally, any police service (even one as convoluted as the Russian
    > one) would aim its investigation at the suppliers of dubious goods &
    > services rather than a consumer. Perhaps the principal got up
    > someone's nose. It could not be the education authority, judging by
    > its response to go Linux. Perhaps there was another problem, like the
    > education authority refusing to buy a flat rate Windows / Office
    > licence as some school systems buy (like the New Zealand Eduction
    > Ministry at about $US1 per head of population), and an example needed
    > to be made of someone to coerce the authority to fall into line.
    >
    > Teachers around the globe must surely be concerned when one of their
    > innocent colleagues risks being dispatched to the Gualg, and Microsoft
    > happily condones such action at least initially.
    >
    >
    > Who knows?


    Something which I read yesterday briefly covered an interview with Microsoft
    on this issue. I think it was all in Russian, but the interesting part is
    that where Microsoft gets questioned about the move to Linux. Microsoft
    avoided the question and instead spoke about how great Windows is. Needless
    to mention, there's worry there.

    --
    ~~ Best wishes

    The Intel-Dell-MS oligopoly/treo can be weakened by competition (Freedom)
    http://Schestowitz.com | Open Prospects ¦ PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    Tasks: 129 total, 2 running, 123 sleeping, 0 stopped, 4 zombie
    http://iuron.com - knowledge engine, not a search engine
     
    Roy Schestowitz, Feb 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    On Feb 10, 12:05 pm, "peterwn" <> wrote:
    > See:http://www.ospint.com/text/d/3935414/
    >
    > This is a fairly significant backtrack by Microsoft.
    >
    > However MS said: "In this particular case, it's important to point out
    > that Microsoft did not instigate the prosecution against Mr. Ponosov".
    >

    See:
    http://eng.cnews.ru/reviews/indexEn.shtml?2007/02/08/234740

    So Microsoft's attempts to distance itself from this case are now
    falling apart. Looks like the school was investigated by the Russian
    version of BSA, and Microsoft is still trying to distance itself from
    the investigating organization, but it is well known that Microsoft
    has a major involvement (ay even the 'major shareholder') in
    organisations such as BSA (the one that busted Ernie Ball).

    Seems stange that a Micosoft accredited reseller releases second hand
    computers for sale which neitherhas a fresh licensed copy of Windows
    installed nor the HD erased. Wonder if these machines have usual OEM
    licences and stickers which means MS is asserting the finer points of
    EULA to say the licence has lapsed merely because the computers
    changed hands.

    It is interesting that Microsoft is able to take advantge of the
    situation in various second world countries that have harsh and
    arbitary penal regimes.

    No one would wish the Gulag on their worst enemies, but it seems that
    Bill and Steve would.
     
    peterwn, Feb 10, 2007
    #3
  4. peterwn

    Peter Guest

    peterwn wrote:
    > It is interesting that Microsoft is able to take advantge of the
    > situation in various second world countries that have harsh and
    > arbitary penal regimes.


    MS must really hate the one laptop per child project.
    http://www.laptop.org/
    Imagine, all those children learning without the constraints of closed
    software, and having the freedom to explore and innovate and the means to
    do so.



    Peter
     
    Peter, Feb 10, 2007
    #4
  5. __/ [ peterwn ] on Saturday 10 February 2007 04:23 \__

    > On Feb 10, 12:05 pm, "peterwn" <> wrote:
    >> See:http://www.ospint.com/text/d/3935414/
    >>
    >> This is a fairly significant backtrack by Microsoft.
    >>
    >> However MS said: "In this particular case, it's important to point out
    >> that Microsoft did not instigate the prosecution against Mr. Ponosov".
    >>

    > See:
    > http://eng.cnews.ru/reviews/indexEn.shtml?2007/02/08/234740
    >
    > So Microsoft's attempts to distance itself from this case are now
    > falling apart. Looks like the school was investigated by the Russian
    > version of BSA, and Microsoft is still trying to distance itself from
    > the investigating organization, but it is well known that Microsoft
    > has a major involvement (ay even the 'major shareholder') in
    > organisations such as BSA (the one that busted Ernie Ball).
    >
    > Seems stange that a Micosoft accredited reseller releases second hand
    > computers for sale which neitherhas a fresh licensed copy of Windows
    > installed nor the HD erased. Wonder if these machines have usual OEM
    > licences and stickers which means MS is asserting the finer points of
    > EULA to say the licence has lapsed merely because the computers
    > changed hands.
    >
    > It is interesting that Microsoft is able to take advantge of the
    > situation in various second world countries that have harsh and
    > arbitary penal regimes.
    >
    > No one would wish the Gulag on their worst enemies, but it seems that
    > Bill and Steve would.


    This is getting worse for Microsoft credibility /AND/ image. They sort of
    lied. Also compare this to the quiet lobbying at Europe.

    The following is a previous report. I spotted this on January 30th after
    earlier reports from the ISC, whose Web site revealed to me are funded by
    Microsoft.

    European Commission denies favouring open source

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | The Commission's statement comes just days after it was lobbied to
    | clarify its position on open source. The Initiative for Software
    | Choice (ISC) wrote to the Commission immediately after the
    | release of the report urging it to contact the "international
    | press" to "set the record straight" over its stance. The ISC's
    | external affairs are handled by CompTIA, which is funded by
    | several IT vendors including Microsoft.
    | ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    `----

    http://uk.news.yahoo.com/30012007/152/european-commission-denies-favouring-open-source.html

    Then came this:

    ,----[ Quote ]
    | "The European Commission has resisted efforts by Microsoft to make it
    | abandon its report into open source software, it was revealed this week
    |
    | [...]
    |
    | The software giant also commissioned a respected university
    | academic to back its case and enlisted the help of a trade
    | association, CompTIA."
    `----

    http://software.silicon.com/applications/0,39024653,39165722,00.htm

    Aha! So silicon.com cofirms this. Yet more lobbying through proxies. They do
    it /all/ the time. That's why they create bodies around the world, to serve
    as proxies. Although SCO was not created by Microsoft, it was used in a
    similar fashion.

    --
    ~~ Best wishes

    Roy S. Schestowitz | Useless fact: Every polar bear is left-handed
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT GNU/Linux ¦ PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    8:00am up 18 days 8:18, 6 users, load average: 0.29, 0.20, 0.23
    http://iuron.com - help build a non-profit search engine
     
    Roy Schestowitz, Feb 10, 2007
    #5
  6. peterwn

    Mutley Guest

    Peter <> wrote:

    >peterwn wrote:
    >> It is interesting that Microsoft is able to take advantge of the
    >> situation in various second world countries that have harsh and
    >> arbitary penal regimes.

    >
    >MS must really hate the one laptop per child project.
    >http://www.laptop.org/
    >Imagine, all those children learning without the constraints of closed
    >software, and having the freedom to explore and innovate and the means to
    >do so.
    >
    >
    >
    >Peter
    >

    I'm surprised that MS has not tried (thru congress) to get these
    things made illegal and the sale of them will promote terrorism..
     
    Mutley, Feb 10, 2007
    #6
  7. peterwn

    Peter Guest

    Mutley wrote:
    > I'm surprised that MS has not tried (thru congress) to get these
    > things made illegal and the sale of them will promote terrorism..


    shhhhhh ... don't give them ideas
     
    Peter, Feb 11, 2007
    #7
  8. peterwn

    Rafael Guest

    peterwn wrote:
    > On Feb 10, 12:05 pm, "peterwn" <> wrote:
    >> See:http://www.ospint.com/text/d/3935414/
    >>
    >> This is a fairly significant backtrack by Microsoft.
    >>
    >> However MS said: "In this particular case, it's important to point out
    >> that Microsoft did not instigate the prosecution against Mr. Ponosov".

    >
    > See:
    > http://eng.cnews.ru/reviews/indexEn.shtml?2007/02/08/234740
    >
    > So Microsoft's attempts to distance itself from this case are now
    > falling apart. Looks like the school was investigated by the Russian
    > version of BSA, and Microsoft is still trying to distance itself from
    > the investigating organization, but it is well known that Microsoft
    > has a major involvement (ay even the 'major shareholder') in
    > organisations such as BSA (the one that busted Ernie Ball).
    >
    > Seems stange that a Micosoft accredited reseller releases second hand
    > computers for sale which neitherhas a fresh licensed copy of Windows
    > installed nor the HD erased. Wonder if these machines have usual OEM
    > licences and stickers which means MS is asserting the finer points of
    > EULA to say the licence has lapsed merely because the computers
    > changed hands.
    >
    > It is interesting that Microsoft is able to take advantge of the
    > situation in various second world countries that have harsh and
    > arbitary penal regimes.
    >
    > No one would wish the Gulag on their worst enemies, but it seems that
    > Bill and Steve would.


    Comrade Peter, issue has been resolved, State IT news website had this
    to say:

    http://eng.cnews.ru/news/top/indexEn.shtml?2007/02/05/234178

    > Schools in the Perm region will soon quit buying software from
    > commercial companies, said the region’s Education Minister Nikolay
    > Karpushin. The announcement was made in line with the report on
    > ensuring “license purity” in the region’s schools.
    >
    > According to Nikolay Karpushin schools would start using freely
    > distributed software like the Linux OS, Russky office and Open office
    > desktop apps, Ekho Moskvi reports. “Buying business and commercial
    > programmes from producers is quite expensive”, the Minister said.


    Linux and FOSS will be installed to the glory of the motherland.

    --
    Cheers, Rafael

    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/linux/advocacy/faq-and-primer/
    http://www.hyphenologist.co.uk/killfile/anti_troll_faq.htm
     
    Rafael, Feb 12, 2007
    #8
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