routers access

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Molecule, Nov 23, 2007.

  1. Molecule

    Molecule Guest

    I would like to access the setup page of a wired router and a wireless
    router from only my desktop. It seems I can only enter the setup page of the
    wired one.
    The system is as follow: modem>wired router to Desktop, one laptop, and
    wireless router ( 2 laptops connected wirelessly ), have RIP direction
    enabled and RIP version disabled. The wired router is a Netgear RP614 v4.
    Thanks
     
    Molecule, Nov 23, 2007
    #1
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  2. Molecule wrote:

    > I would like to access the setup page of a wired router and a wireless
    > router from only my desktop. It seems I can only enter the setup page of
    > the wired one.
    > The system is as follow: modem>wired router to Desktop, one laptop, and
    > wireless router ( 2 laptops connected wirelessly ), have RIP direction
    > enabled and RIP version disabled. The wired router is a Netgear RP614 v4.
    > Thanks


    The wireless router actually works as a access point only?
    It should get its IP address from the dhcp server in the wired router, with
    it's own shut off.
    So you first have to look up the connection data for your wireless AP on the
    config/status page of the wired router, then use the IP address you found
    there, for the wireless one.
     
    wisdomkiller & pain, Nov 23, 2007
    #2
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  3. Molecule

    Guest

    On Nov 22, 11:52 pm, wisdomkiller & pain <nomail.
    > wrote:
    > Molecule wrote:
    > > I would like to access the setup page of a wired router and a wireless
    > > router from only my desktop. It seems I can only enter the setup page of
    > > the wired one.
    > > The system is as follow: modem>wired router to Desktop, one laptop, and
    > > wireless router ( 2 laptops connected wirelessly ), have RIP direction
    > > enabled and RIP version disabled. The wired router is a Netgear RP614 v4.
    > > Thanks

    >
    > The wireless router actually works as a access point only?
    > It should get its IP address from the dhcp server in the wired router, with
    > it's own shut off.
    > So you first have to look up the connection data for your wireless AP on the
    > config/status page of the wired router, then use the IP address you found
    > there, for the wireless one.


    That should work, as long as the wireless router is pulling a DHCP
    address from the wired one. Otherwise, it may not show in the client
    table. The line from the wired router is plugged into the WAN/
    Internet port of the wireless one, right?

    What is the model of wireless router/access point?

    Are all of your computers on the same LAN? (i.e. you can ping the IPs
    of them all; to and from the wireless laptops and your desktop?)
    --If no to this, then grab all the IP's and subnet masks from the
    computers and check.
     
    , Nov 23, 2007
    #3
  4. Molecule

    Molecule Guest

    Well, to be honest all works fine but I am getting confused:
    I got both DHCP from the two routers enabled and at the same time I specify
    static addresses for the wired LAN addresses and the wireless LAN . Was told
    it is not the way to do it.
    The two routers addresses are 192.168.1.1 ( wired ) and 192.168.11.1
    (wireless -buffalo G54). The WAN address of the wireless will always be
    192.168.1.5
    How do I put all PC under the same LAN with my two routers?
    Why should I shut off the DHCP server of the wireless router if the routers
    have different addresses?
    Would like to read more about configuring, is there a book or a site I could
    go to?
    the wireless router works only as access point.
    Many thanks





    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Nov 22, 11:52 pm, wisdomkiller & pain <nomail.
    > > wrote:
    >> Molecule wrote:
    >> > I would like to access the setup page of a wired router and a wireless
    >> > router from only my desktop. It seems I can only enter the setup page
    >> > of
    >> > the wired one.
    >> > The system is as follow: modem>wired router to Desktop, one laptop, and
    >> > wireless router ( 2 laptops connected wirelessly ), have RIP direction
    >> > enabled and RIP version disabled. The wired router is a Netgear RP614
    >> > v4.
    >> > Thanks

    >>
    >> The wireless router actually works as a access point only?
    >> It should get its IP address from the dhcp server in the wired router,
    >> with
    >> it's own shut off.
    >> So you first have to look up the connection data for your wireless AP on
    >> the
    >> config/status page of the wired router, then use the IP address you found
    >> there, for the wireless one.

    >
    > That should work, as long as the wireless router is pulling a DHCP
    > address from the wired one. Otherwise, it may not show in the client
    > table. The line from the wired router is plugged into the WAN/
    > Internet port of the wireless one, right?
    >
    > What is the model of wireless router/access point?
    >
    > Are all of your computers on the same LAN? (i.e. you can ping the IPs
    > of them all; to and from the wireless laptops and your desktop?)
    > --If no to this, then grab all the IP's and subnet masks from the
    > computers and check.
     
    Molecule, Nov 23, 2007
    #4
  5. Molecule

    Guest

    On Nov 23, 7:02 am, "Molecule" <> wrote:
    > Well, to be honest all works fine but I am getting confused:
    > I got both DHCP from the two routers enabled and at the same time I specify
    > static addresses for the wired LAN addresses and the wireless LAN . Was told
    > it is not the way to do it.
    > The two routers addresses are 192.168.1.1 ( wired ) and 192.168.11.1
    > (wireless -buffalo G54). The WAN address of the wireless will always be
    > 192.168.1.5
    > How do I put all PC under the same LAN with my two routers?
    > Why should I shut off the DHCP server of the wireless router if the routers
    > have different addresses?
    > Would like to read more about configuring, is there a book or a site I could
    > go to?
    > the wireless router works only as access point.
    > Many thanks
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Nov 22, 11:52 pm, wisdomkiller & pain <nomail.
    > > > wrote:
    > >> Molecule wrote:
    > >> > I would like to access the setup page of a wired router and a wireless
    > >> > router from only my desktop. It seems I can only enter the setup page
    > >> > of
    > >> > the wired one.
    > >> > The system is as follow: modem>wired router to Desktop, one laptop, and
    > >> > wireless router ( 2 laptops connected wirelessly ), have RIP direction
    > >> > enabled and RIP version disabled. The wired router is a Netgear RP614
    > >> > v4.
    > >> > Thanks

    >
    > >> The wireless router actually works as a access point only?
    > >> It should get its IP address from the dhcp server in the wired router,
    > >> with
    > >> it's own shut off.
    > >> So you first have to look up the connection data for your wireless AP on
    > >> the
    > >> config/status page of the wired router, then use the IP address you found
    > >> there, for the wireless one.

    >
    > > That should work, as long as the wireless router is pulling a DHCP
    > > address from the wired one. Otherwise, it may not show in the client
    > > table. The line from the wired router is plugged into the WAN/
    > > Internet port of the wireless one, right?

    >
    > > What is the model of wireless router/access point?

    >
    > > Are all of your computers on the same LAN? (i.e. you can ping the IPs
    > > of them all; to and from the wireless laptops and your desktop?)
    > > --If no to this, then grab all the IP's and subnet masks from the
    > > computers and check.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Ok, let's start with this question. Why do you have 2 routers on your
    network at all? The Buffalo is a wireless router and 4 port wired
    switch (unless I am looking at the wrong one). If you only have a
    desktop and a laptop that need to be wired-in, along with 2 other
    wireless clients, why not just use the Buffalo to do it all? Plug it
    in to your modem directly (WAN/Internet port). You may want to reset
    the Buffalo beforehand to restore factory settings and clear anything
    that is in there now, which I recommend (start fresh).

    If you are setting static IP addresses, then there is no reason for
    you to have DHCP turned on in your network. DHCP is for assigning
    dynamic IP's to clients, and if you are setting them explicitly, you
    have no need to use DHCP (unless you want to assign an address to
    another pc, like maybe a friends when he/she comes over and you don't
    want to have to set a static IP on their machine. They'll just grab
    an address from DHCP.) You can set your machines up to use DHCP also,
    and then you wouldn't have to set each PCs IP address, subnet mask,
    and gateway. That's up to you.

    In order to put all the PC's under the same LAN, they need to be in
    the same network/subnet. I can give you the details on this, but
    first decide if you want to continue to use the 2 routers, or cut it
    back to one. If you cut it back to one, and then set all PC's to
    "obtain an IP address automatically", and also use DHCP, then that's
    it pretty much. The PC's will grab an IP from the router (also the
    DHCP server); these IPs will be on the same network.
    If you want to continue using static addressing just say so and I will
    try to provide you the information you need to know in order to put
    computers on the same network. You see, with static addressing, you
    must set each PC up with IP, subnet mask, and gateway. It's not hard
    though, don't get me wrong. It's just when using DHCP the computer
    grabs all that information from the DHCP server and you don't have to
    set it. You can see how in a very large network, well, you can see
    why something like DHCP was invented when you think about 300-400+
    PCs...

    There is a site that may help you. They have many FAQ sections and a
    very active forum section, which may get you more answers in a faster
    fashon. The site is: http://www.dslreports.com

    If you want to post over there, I am sure they will be glad to help.
    Let me know though if you do so I won't keep posting here.

    Hope that helps.
     
    , Nov 23, 2007
    #5
  6. Molecule

    Molecule Guest

    Wow, many thanks!
    I wanted to use 2 routers as my flatmate and I prefer wired and we don't
    want the wireless router in our rooms upstairs. Since the cable comes in my
    room ( upstairs ) I decided to keep the modem in there, put the wired router
    ( wanted also a phisical firewall ) and have a cable going to my flatmate
    and one downstairs to the wireless router where other people live and have
    wireless laptops. All is working fine now, but I was just wondering:
    if I turn off the wireless DHCP shouldn't a laptop connected wirelessly to
    it look for another DHCP ( which in this case would be my wired router ) and
    get an ip address?
    If I assign a static ip would it have to be given usingthe wireless or the
    wired router?
    People say don't have 2 DHCP running, but it is working fine, what problems
    could they create? IP cannot overlap as the routers have different
    addresses.
    Will read a bit more on the forum mentioned, thanks for your help






    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Nov 23, 7:02 am, "Molecule" <> wrote:
    >> Well, to be honest all works fine but I am getting confused:
    >> I got both DHCP from the two routers enabled and at the same time I
    >> specify
    >> static addresses for the wired LAN addresses and the wireless LAN . Was
    >> told
    >> it is not the way to do it.
    >> The two routers addresses are 192.168.1.1 ( wired ) and 192.168.11.1
    >> (wireless -buffalo G54). The WAN address of the wireless will always be
    >> 192.168.1.5
    >> How do I put all PC under the same LAN with my two routers?
    >> Why should I shut off the DHCP server of the wireless router if the
    >> routers
    >> have different addresses?
    >> Would like to read more about configuring, is there a book or a site I
    >> could
    >> go to?
    >> the wireless router works only as access point.
    >> Many thanks
    >>
    >> <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > On Nov 22, 11:52 pm, wisdomkiller & pain <nomail.
    >> > > wrote:
    >> >> Molecule wrote:
    >> >> > I would like to access the setup page of a wired router and a
    >> >> > wireless
    >> >> > router from only my desktop. It seems I can only enter the setup
    >> >> > page
    >> >> > of
    >> >> > the wired one.
    >> >> > The system is as follow: modem>wired router to Desktop, one laptop,
    >> >> > and
    >> >> > wireless router ( 2 laptops connected wirelessly ), have RIP
    >> >> > direction
    >> >> > enabled and RIP version disabled. The wired router is a Netgear
    >> >> > RP614
    >> >> > v4.
    >> >> > Thanks

    >>
    >> >> The wireless router actually works as a access point only?
    >> >> It should get its IP address from the dhcp server in the wired router,
    >> >> with
    >> >> it's own shut off.
    >> >> So you first have to look up the connection data for your wireless AP
    >> >> on
    >> >> the
    >> >> config/status page of the wired router, then use the IP address you
    >> >> found
    >> >> there, for the wireless one.

    >>
    >> > That should work, as long as the wireless router is pulling a DHCP
    >> > address from the wired one. Otherwise, it may not show in the client
    >> > table. The line from the wired router is plugged into the WAN/
    >> > Internet port of the wireless one, right?

    >>
    >> > What is the model of wireless router/access point?

    >>
    >> > Are all of your computers on the same LAN? (i.e. you can ping the IPs
    >> > of them all; to and from the wireless laptops and your desktop?)
    >> > --If no to this, then grab all the IP's and subnet masks from the
    >> > computers and check.- Hide quoted text -

    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Ok, let's start with this question. Why do you have 2 routers on your
    > network at all? The Buffalo is a wireless router and 4 port wired
    > switch (unless I am looking at the wrong one). If you only have a
    > desktop and a laptop that need to be wired-in, along with 2 other
    > wireless clients, why not just use the Buffalo to do it all? Plug it
    > in to your modem directly (WAN/Internet port). You may want to reset
    > the Buffalo beforehand to restore factory settings and clear anything
    > that is in there now, which I recommend (start fresh).
    >
    > If you are setting static IP addresses, then there is no reason for
    > you to have DHCP turned on in your network. DHCP is for assigning
    > dynamic IP's to clients, and if you are setting them explicitly, you
    > have no need to use DHCP (unless you want to assign an address to
    > another pc, like maybe a friends when he/she comes over and you don't
    > want to have to set a static IP on their machine. They'll just grab
    > an address from DHCP.) You can set your machines up to use DHCP also,
    > and then you wouldn't have to set each PCs IP address, subnet mask,
    > and gateway. That's up to you.
    >
    > In order to put all the PC's under the same LAN, they need to be in
    > the same network/subnet. I can give you the details on this, but
    > first decide if you want to continue to use the 2 routers, or cut it
    > back to one. If you cut it back to one, and then set all PC's to
    > "obtain an IP address automatically", and also use DHCP, then that's
    > it pretty much. The PC's will grab an IP from the router (also the
    > DHCP server); these IPs will be on the same network.
    > If you want to continue using static addressing just say so and I will
    > try to provide you the information you need to know in order to put
    > computers on the same network. You see, with static addressing, you
    > must set each PC up with IP, subnet mask, and gateway. It's not hard
    > though, don't get me wrong. It's just when using DHCP the computer
    > grabs all that information from the DHCP server and you don't have to
    > set it. You can see how in a very large network, well, you can see
    > why something like DHCP was invented when you think about 300-400+
    > PCs...
    >
    > There is a site that may help you. They have many FAQ sections and a
    > very active forum section, which may get you more answers in a faster
    > fashon. The site is: http://www.dslreports.com
    >
    > If you want to post over there, I am sure they will be glad to help.
    > Let me know though if you do so I won't keep posting here.
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
     
    Molecule, Nov 24, 2007
    #6
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