router vs hub

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by claude nine, Jan 17, 2004.

  1. claude nine

    claude nine Guest

    I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    wrong?

    Thanks
     
    claude nine, Jan 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. claude nine

    claude nine Guest

    forgot to say that they are wired, not wireless.
     
    claude nine, Jan 17, 2004
    #2
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  3. claude nine

    Win Guest

    one copmputer is talking to the other computer when it should be talting to
    the router
    The documentation should explaine how to set up the router
    just do it on both P.C's

    "claude nine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    > internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    > but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    > no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    > and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    > wrong?
    >
    > Thanks
     
    Win, Jan 17, 2004
    #3
  4. claude nine

    claude nine Guest

    On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 10:24:03 +1300, "Win" <>
    wrote:

    >one copmputer is talking to the other computer when it should be talting to
    >the router
    >The documentation should explaine how to set up the router
    >just do it on both P.C's
    >
    >"claude nine" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >> internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >> but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >> no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >> and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >> wrong?
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >

    Thanks for that, Win. Just lazy, I guess.
     
    claude nine, Jan 17, 2004
    #4
  5. claude nine

    Harrison Guest

    According to the headers, you are on shaw.ca, a broadband provider.
    Most broadband providers issue one IP address per customer.
    The router needs to use that IP to establish communications with the
    external network. Therefore, the router must also be configured to
    issue internal IP addresses to the LAN clients.
    My guess would be that the router is not properly configured to
    administer DHCP to the internal network.

    You could also try plugging the Internet connection into one of the
    switched ports on the router instead of the one labeled "Internet or
    WAN". If it worked before through using a hub, it should work the same
    way through the router, which in this instance would be used as a
    switch.

    On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:06:55 GMT, claude nine
    <> wrote:

    >I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >wrong?
    >
    >Thanks
     
    Harrison, Jan 17, 2004
    #5
  6. claude nine

    claude nine Guest

    On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:42:28 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:

    >According to the headers, you are on shaw.ca, a broadband provider.
    >Most broadband providers issue one IP address per customer.
    >The router needs to use that IP to establish communications with the
    >external network. Therefore, the router must also be configured to
    >issue internal IP addresses to the LAN clients.
    >My guess would be that the router is not properly configured to
    >administer DHCP to the internal network.
    >
    >You could also try plugging the Internet connection into one of the
    >switched ports on the router instead of the one labeled "Internet or
    >WAN". If it worked before through using a hub, it should work the same
    >way through the router, which in this instance would be used as a
    >switch.
    >
    >On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:06:55 GMT, claude nine
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >>internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >>but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >>no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >>and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >>wrong?
    >>
    >>Thanks


    I connected a third computer to the hub, worked fine. Tried it on
    the router - also worked there. Does the type of cable used have
    any bearing on this action? The non-connect uses a crossover cable,
    the new connect uses cable of a different type.
     
    claude nine, Jan 18, 2004
    #6
  7. claude nine

    Harrison Guest

    On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 19:37:44 GMT, claude nine
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:42:28 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >
    >>According to the headers, you are on shaw.ca, a broadband provider.
    >>Most broadband providers issue one IP address per customer.
    >>The router needs to use that IP to establish communications with the
    >>external network. Therefore, the router must also be configured to
    >>issue internal IP addresses to the LAN clients.
    >>My guess would be that the router is not properly configured to
    >>administer DHCP to the internal network.
    >>
    >>You could also try plugging the Internet connection into one of the
    >>switched ports on the router instead of the one labeled "Internet or
    >>WAN". If it worked before through using a hub, it should work the same
    >>way through the router, which in this instance would be used as a
    >>switch.
    >>
    >>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:06:55 GMT, claude nine
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >>>internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >>>but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >>>no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >>>and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >>>wrong?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks

    >
    >I connected a third computer to the hub, worked fine. Tried it on
    >the router - also worked there. Does the type of cable used have
    >any bearing on this action? The non-connect uses a crossover cable,
    >the new connect uses cable of a different type.


    Yes, it has great bearing, unless you're using a Mac.
    Connecting a computer to a hub or switch requires a straight cable,
    not a crossover. Crossover cables are used to connect one pc to
    another, among other things.
     
    Harrison, Jan 18, 2004
    #7
  8. claude nine

    claude nine Guest

    On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 15:20:55 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:

    >On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 19:37:44 GMT, claude nine
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:42:28 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >>
    >>>According to the headers, you are on shaw.ca, a broadband provider.
    >>>Most broadband providers issue one IP address per customer.
    >>>The router needs to use that IP to establish communications with the
    >>>external network. Therefore, the router must also be configured to
    >>>issue internal IP addresses to the LAN clients.
    >>>My guess would be that the router is not properly configured to
    >>>administer DHCP to the internal network.
    >>>
    >>>You could also try plugging the Internet connection into one of the
    >>>switched ports on the router instead of the one labeled "Internet or
    >>>WAN". If it worked before through using a hub, it should work the same
    >>>way through the router, which in this instance would be used as a
    >>>switch.
    >>>
    >>>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:06:55 GMT, claude nine
    >>><> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >>>>internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >>>>but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >>>>no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >>>>and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >>>>wrong?
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks

    >>
    >>I connected a third computer to the hub, worked fine. Tried it on
    >>the router - also worked there. Does the type of cable used have
    >>any bearing on this action? The non-connect uses a crossover cable,
    >>the new connect uses cable of a different type.

    >
    >Yes, it has great bearing, unless you're using a Mac.
    >Connecting a computer to a hub or switch requires a straight cable,
    >not a crossover. Crossover cables are used to connect one pc to
    >another, among other things.


    This thing is strange. The two originally connected to the hub were
    both using crossover cables. When they connected to the router,
    both using crossover, only one would not connect. It has a longer
    run than the connected - would that account for the success of the
    connected one?
     
    claude nine, Jan 18, 2004
    #8
  9. claude nine

    Harrison Guest

    On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 20:43:25 GMT, claude nine
    <> wrote:

    >On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 15:20:55 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 19:37:44 GMT, claude nine
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:42:28 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>According to the headers, you are on shaw.ca, a broadband provider.
    >>>>Most broadband providers issue one IP address per customer.
    >>>>The router needs to use that IP to establish communications with the
    >>>>external network. Therefore, the router must also be configured to
    >>>>issue internal IP addresses to the LAN clients.
    >>>>My guess would be that the router is not properly configured to
    >>>>administer DHCP to the internal network.
    >>>>
    >>>>You could also try plugging the Internet connection into one of the
    >>>>switched ports on the router instead of the one labeled "Internet or
    >>>>WAN". If it worked before through using a hub, it should work the same
    >>>>way through the router, which in this instance would be used as a
    >>>>switch.
    >>>>
    >>>>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:06:55 GMT, claude nine
    >>>><> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >>>>>internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >>>>>but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >>>>>no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >>>>>and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >>>>>wrong?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Thanks
    >>>
    >>>I connected a third computer to the hub, worked fine. Tried it on
    >>>the router - also worked there. Does the type of cable used have
    >>>any bearing on this action? The non-connect uses a crossover cable,
    >>>the new connect uses cable of a different type.

    >>
    >>Yes, it has great bearing, unless you're using a Mac.
    >>Connecting a computer to a hub or switch requires a straight cable,
    >>not a crossover. Crossover cables are used to connect one pc to
    >>another, among other things.

    >
    >This thing is strange. The two originally connected to the hub were
    >both using crossover cables. When they connected to the router,
    >both using crossover, only one would not connect. It has a longer
    >run than the connected - would that account for the success of the
    >connected one?


    Not unless the run exceeds 100 meters (roughly 300 ft.).
    That is the distance limitation of Ethernet.
    Visit www.practicallynetworked.com to learn more about Ethernet
    networking, cabling, routers, switches, hubs, etc.
     
    Harrison, Jan 18, 2004
    #9
  10. claude nine

    claude nine Guest

    On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 16:03:55 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:

    >On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 20:43:25 GMT, claude nine
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 15:20:55 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 19:37:44 GMT, claude nine
    >>><> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:42:28 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>According to the headers, you are on shaw.ca, a broadband provider.
    >>>>>Most broadband providers issue one IP address per customer.
    >>>>>The router needs to use that IP to establish communications with the
    >>>>>external network. Therefore, the router must also be configured to
    >>>>>issue internal IP addresses to the LAN clients.
    >>>>>My guess would be that the router is not properly configured to
    >>>>>administer DHCP to the internal network.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>You could also try plugging the Internet connection into one of the
    >>>>>switched ports on the router instead of the one labeled "Internet or
    >>>>>WAN". If it worked before through using a hub, it should work the same
    >>>>>way through the router, which in this instance would be used as a
    >>>>>switch.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:06:55 GMT, claude nine
    >>>>><> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >>>>>>internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >>>>>>but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >>>>>>no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >>>>>>and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >>>>>>wrong?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Thanks
    >>>>
    >>>>I connected a third computer to the hub, worked fine. Tried it on
    >>>>the router - also worked there. Does the type of cable used have
    >>>>any bearing on this action? The non-connect uses a crossover cable,
    >>>>the new connect uses cable of a different type.
    >>>
    >>>Yes, it has great bearing, unless you're using a Mac.
    >>>Connecting a computer to a hub or switch requires a straight cable,
    >>>not a crossover. Crossover cables are used to connect one pc to
    >>>another, among other things.

    >>
    >>This thing is strange. The two originally connected to the hub were
    >>both using crossover cables. When they connected to the router,
    >>both using crossover, only one would not connect. It has a longer
    >>run than the connected - would that account for the success of the
    >>connected one?

    >
    >Not unless the run exceeds 100 meters (roughly 300 ft.).
    >That is the distance limitation of Ethernet.
    >Visit www.practicallynetworked.com to learn more about Ethernet
    >networking, cabling, routers, switches, hubs, etc.


    Thanks very much for your help - and thanks for that link.
    Gotta learn more, I guess.
     
    claude nine, Jan 18, 2004
    #10
  11. claude nine

    Harrison Guest

    On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 21:37:07 GMT, claude nine
    <> wrote:

    >On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 16:03:55 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 20:43:25 GMT, claude nine
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 15:20:55 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 19:37:44 GMT, claude nine
    >>>><> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:42:28 -0500, Harrison <Harrison> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>According to the headers, you are on shaw.ca, a broadband provider.
    >>>>>>Most broadband providers issue one IP address per customer.
    >>>>>>The router needs to use that IP to establish communications with the
    >>>>>>external network. Therefore, the router must also be configured to
    >>>>>>issue internal IP addresses to the LAN clients.
    >>>>>>My guess would be that the router is not properly configured to
    >>>>>>administer DHCP to the internal network.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>You could also try plugging the Internet connection into one of the
    >>>>>>switched ports on the router instead of the one labeled "Internet or
    >>>>>>WAN". If it worked before through using a hub, it should work the same
    >>>>>>way through the router, which in this instance would be used as a
    >>>>>>switch.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:06:55 GMT, claude nine
    >>>>>><> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I have two computers both running WinXP successfully hooked up to he
    >>>>>>>internet through a 10 port hub. I want to switch to a 4port router,
    >>>>>>>but one computer cannot access the net through the router. There is
    >>>>>>>no software on the reluctant computer that is not on the good guy,
    >>>>>>>and the computer internals are identical. Any ideas what I am doing
    >>>>>>>wrong?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Thanks
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I connected a third computer to the hub, worked fine. Tried it on
    >>>>>the router - also worked there. Does the type of cable used have
    >>>>>any bearing on this action? The non-connect uses a crossover cable,
    >>>>>the new connect uses cable of a different type.
    >>>>
    >>>>Yes, it has great bearing, unless you're using a Mac.
    >>>>Connecting a computer to a hub or switch requires a straight cable,
    >>>>not a crossover. Crossover cables are used to connect one pc to
    >>>>another, among other things.
    >>>
    >>>This thing is strange. The two originally connected to the hub were
    >>>both using crossover cables. When they connected to the router,
    >>>both using crossover, only one would not connect. It has a longer
    >>>run than the connected - would that account for the success of the
    >>>connected one?

    >>
    >>Not unless the run exceeds 100 meters (roughly 300 ft.).
    >>That is the distance limitation of Ethernet.
    >>Visit www.practicallynetworked.com to learn more about Ethernet
    >>networking, cabling, routers, switches, hubs, etc.

    >
    >Thanks very much for your help - and thanks for that link.
    >Gotta learn more, I guess.

    One day, it will just connect and work.
    And I'll be out of a job :)
     
    Harrison, Jan 18, 2004
    #11
  12. Howdy!

    "claude nine" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > This thing is strange. The two originally connected to the hub were
    > both using crossover cables. When they connected to the router,
    > both using crossover, only one would not connect. It has a longer
    > run than the connected - would that account for the success of the
    > connected one?


    Nope. ONE port on most hubs is built to have a cross over
    internally. So if you plug into that with a crossover, it's the same as
    using a straight through to a straight through port.

    Unless the wiring is crazy .. then, if it's negotiating 100/Full,
    and the hub was 10/half, that could do it.

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Jan 19, 2004
    #12
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